Short Nonfiction Collection, Vol. 103 - jo

Short Poetry Collections, Short Story Collections, and our Weekly Poetry Project
Sue Anderson
Posts: 5213
Joined: July 24th, 2008, 11:48 am
Location: Midwest, USA

Post by Sue Anderson »

Note: knotyouraveragejo is Metacoordinator (MC); Sue Anderson is Book Coordinator and Dedicated Proof Listener (BC, DPL).

Short Nonfiction Collection, Vol. 103

This is an ongoing collection of short nonfiction works in English, chosen by the readers, which are in the Public Domain (generally meaning that they were published prior to 1929). Nonfiction includes essays and speeches; letters and diaries; biography and history; film, book and music reviews; descriptions of travel; politics and sports; instructional manuals; even a favorite recipe from a Public Domain cookbook! Your recording can be on any topic. Some suggestions for source material can be found here.

For clarification of what "in the Public Domain" means read this. Try to stay with works that run less than 60 minutes [74 minutes is the absolute max]. You may read a maximum of 2 selections per volume. There is no need to sign-up before recording, as long as the work is clearly in the Public Domain. But please note: Transcriptions of public domain texts published on the web by sites other than Gutenberg.org CAN NOT be used as sources! Specifically, Wikisource CAN NOT be used as a source. See "Our policy on text sources."

After 20 recordings are submitted, we will prooflisten, catalog and make them available to the public.

Basic Recording Guide: http://wiki.librivox.org/index.php/Newbie_Guide_to_Recording

1. RECORD:
  • Be sure to set your recording software to: 44100Hz, 32-bit.
  • At the BEGINNING say: "[Title of Work], by [Author Name]" "This is a Librivox recording. All Librivox recordings are in the public domain. For more information or to volunteer, please visit Librivox.org"
  • At the END, say: "End of [Title], by [Author Name]"
  • If you wish, you may also say: "Read by...your name."
  • Please leave no more than 1 second of silence at the beginning of your recording. Add about 5 seconds of silence at the end of your recording.
2. EDIT and SAVE your file:
  • Need noise-cleaning? See this LibriVox wiki page for a complete guide.
  • Save or export your recording to an mp3 file at 128kbs constant bit rate. The uploader will add the .mp3 to the end of your file name when it uploads. Please use the format shown. Your file name should have this format before you upload it:

    snf103_titleofwork_authorlastname_yourinitials_128kb
  • After it is uploaded, it should have this format:
    https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf103_titleofwork_authorlastname_yourinitials_128kb.mp3
  • FILE NAMES HAVE RULES!
    Just a word or two to identify the title. Omit "a," "the," etc. Author's LAST NAME only. Everything lower case, including author's last name & your initials!
3. UPLOAD your recording:
  • Upload your finished recording using the LibriVox uploader: http://librivox.org/login/uploader. When your upload is complete, you will receive a link - copy and post it to the current nonfiction thread. If you don't post that you've uploaded your recording, the nonfiction book coordinator won't know that you did it!
    Image
  • If you have trouble reading the image above, please send a private message to any admin.
  • To upload, you'll need to select the MC, which for the Short Nonfiction Collection is: knotyouraveragejo
  • If this doesn't work, or you have questions, please check our How To Send Your Recording wiki page
4. POST the following information in this thread:
  • Title of the work.
  • Author of the work.
  • The link to your file you copied from the uploader.
  • A URL link to the source from which you read (etext URL). If posting from Gutenberg, please provide the link to the download page, e.g. http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/# (where # is the Gutenberg project number for the book). Note: WikiSource is not accepted as a source for a recording.
  • Length in minutes.
  • If this is your first Librivox recording, we will also need your name as you would like it to appear in the LibriVox catalog, and, if you have a web page and want it linked to your name in the catalog, the URL of the web page.
5. PROOF LISTENING AND DEADLINE FOR EDITS on recordings you have submitted:
  • The SNF Collection has SPECIAL STANDARDS for PLing, which reflect our concern for accuracy in reading nonfiction material.
  • We proof listen for the following:
    • Has the recording passed "Checker?" [set on "Gentle Validation," to check File Names and Technical Specifications only]. This LibriVox app looks for common problems associated with LibriVox recordings. https://wiki.librivox.org/index.php/Checker
    • Does the recording have errors that change the meaning of the text? This includes words accidentally added, omitted, mispronounced, or misread!
    • Does the recording have the LibriVox intro? Are there any long silences or pauses, stumbles or repeats that need to be edited out? Are there 5 seconds of silence at the end of the recording?
  • We ask that you complete any editing requested by the Dedicated Proof Listener within two weeks of the request, or, if you need more time, that you post in this thread to request an extension. There’s no shame in this; we’re all volunteers and things happen. Extensions are, however, at the discretion of the Book Coordinator. To be fair to the other readers, sections which cannot be edited in a timely manner will be deleted from the current volume of the Nonfiction Collection, but they can always be included in a future volume when the edits are complete.

Magic Window:



BC Admin
Sue Anderson
Posts: 5213
Joined: July 24th, 2008, 11:48 am
Location: Midwest, USA

Post by Sue Anderson »

Welcome to Volume 103 of the Short Nonfiction Collection. This is a place to share a special interest by recording a short work of public domain nonfiction. If you haven't something already in mind that you'd like to record, there are many bookshelves at Gutenberg.org to explore http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/bookshelf/. The bookshelves for Countries, Education, Fine Arts, History, Music, Periodicals, and Technology are some places to start.

Hathi Trust and Archive.org are good resources:

https://archive.org/
https://www.hathitrust.org/

The Online Books Page has over 2 million PD listings! It was suggested by LibriVoxer Soupy.
http://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/lists.html

The Congressional Research Service publishes a lot of articles on recent events, U.S. law, U.S. policy, the economy, international politics, etc. here: https://crsreports.congress.gov/search/#/?termsToSearch=&orderBy=Date.
If you narrow by "Resources" and/or "Posts", you will get a lot of short articles that would be well-suited for this Short Nonfiction Collection.
This suggestion came from LibriVoxer elsieselwyn.

The Biodiversity Heritage Library is a great source for natural history. It was suggested by LibriVoxer MillionMoments. http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/

Please note: Transcriptions of public domain texts published on the web by sites other than Gutenberg.org CAN NOT be used as sources! Specifically, Wikisource CAN NOT be used as a source. See "Our policy on text sources." If you are interested in reading a text you have found on Wikisource, I will be happy to help you locate an alternative reading source. Just post me a query on the thread.

If you have any doubts about the public domain status of anything you want to read for the collection, please feel free to post the source along with your query in the thread, and I will be glad to help you! Thanks!

Please note: There is a limit of two selections per reader for this volume of Short Nonfiction.

Please check the File Name and Technical Specifications of your recording with Checker https://wiki.librivox.org/index.php/Checker before sending it up to the Nonfiction Collection! :) Checker is an easy to use "open source tool that looks for common problems with recordings for LibriVox... Checker saves time by checking contributions for common issues before files are uploaded." Thanks! :) :)

Sue (Book Coordinator, Short Nonfiction Collection)
Last edited by Sue Anderson on March 11th, 2024, 3:16 pm, edited 2 times in total.
elsieselwyn
Posts: 3410
Joined: March 28th, 2019, 8:37 pm
Location: Ohio, USA

Post by elsieselwyn »

Hey Sue!

I haven't got any recordings for you (yet :lol: ), but I thought I would pop-in with a resource suggestion. The Congressional Research Service publishes a lot of articles on recent events, U.S. law, U.S. policy, the economy, international politics, etc. here: https://crsreports.congress.gov/search/#/?termsToSearch=&orderBy=Date.

They are in the public domain because they are published by the U.S. government and, as an added reassurance, at the bottom of each of their publications there is a disclaimer saying the document is in the public domain.

If you narrow by "Resources" and/or "Posts", you will get a lot of short articles that would be well-suited for this Short Nonfiction Collection.

Elsie :9:
Elsie :9:
Like Sweden and coming of age stories? Read for Pelle the Conqueror
Like travelogues and Anthony Trollope? Read for The West Indies and the Spanish Main
Shadowland: October, 1919: 4 roles left
Good Words: 1870: 7 roles left
Sue Anderson
Posts: 5213
Joined: July 24th, 2008, 11:48 am
Location: Midwest, USA

Post by Sue Anderson »

elsieselwyn wrote: March 11th, 2024, 12:30 pm Hey Sue!

I haven't got any recordings for you (yet :lol: ), but I thought I would pop-in with a resource suggestion. The Congressional Research Service publishes a lot of articles on recent events, U.S. law, U.S. policy, the economy, international politics, etc. here: https://crsreports.congress.gov/search/#/?termsToSearch=&orderBy=Date.

They are in the public domain because they are published by the U.S. government and, as an added reassurance, at the bottom of each of their publications there is a disclaimer saying the document is in the public domain.

If you narrow by "Resources" and/or "Posts", you will get a lot of short articles that would be well-suited for this Short Nonfiction Collection.

Elsie :9:
Hi Elsie, Many thanks for this great suggestion! :clap: I've given your idea a permanent quote in my general first post, above. I wasn't aware of the Congressional Research Service before you brought it to my attention, but I've long been a fan of readings from U.S. gov. sources. Because they are in the Public Domain, U.S. Gov. sources can add topics to the Short Nonfiction Collection that couldn't be approached any other way.

I took a look at the CSR Reports section and immediately found several reports that interested me, among them " Membership of the 118th Congress: A Profile" https://crsreports.congress.gov/product/details?prodcode=R47470

I see that many of these reports "informing the legislative debate since 1914" are really on the cutting edge of newsworthy, for instance this one, from March 4, 2024: Presidential Immunity, Criminal Liability, and the Impeachment Judgment Clause" https://crsreports.congress.gov/product/pdf/LSB/LSB11121

So, thanks again, Elsie, for this great suggestion! : :D :D
elsieselwyn
Posts: 3410
Joined: March 28th, 2019, 8:37 pm
Location: Ohio, USA

Post by elsieselwyn »

Sue Anderson wrote: March 11th, 2024, 3:15 pm Hi Elsie, Many thanks for this great suggestion! :clap: I've given your idea a permanent quote in my general first post, above. I wasn't aware of the Congressional Research Service before you brought it to my attention, but I've long been a fan of readings from U.S. gov. sources. Because they are in the Public Domain, U.S. Gov. sources can add topics to the Short Nonfiction Collection that couldn't be approached any other way.

I took a look at the CSR Reports section and immediately found several reports that interested me, among them " Membership of the 118th Congress: A Profile" https://crsreports.congress.gov/product/details?prodcode=R47470

I see that many of these reports "informing the legislative debate since 1914" are really on the cutting edge of newsworthy, for instance this one, from March 4, 2024: Presidential Immunity, Criminal Liability, and the Impeachment Judgment Clause" https://crsreports.congress.gov/product/pdf/LSB/LSB11121

So, thanks again, Elsie, for this great suggestion! : :D :D
Yay! I'm glad you like the suggestion! I was fiddling around surfing the web, found the website, and thought it was a goldmine! :D

There is a lot of interesting stuff in the Reports section too. Many of them are long enough (estimating over an hour of recording) that I think that they would have to be a solo project.
Elsie :9:
Like Sweden and coming of age stories? Read for Pelle the Conqueror
Like travelogues and Anthony Trollope? Read for The West Indies and the Spanish Main
Shadowland: October, 1919: 4 roles left
Good Words: 1870: 7 roles left
elsieselwyn
Posts: 3410
Joined: March 28th, 2019, 8:37 pm
Location: Ohio, USA

Post by elsieselwyn »

Here is one for you, Sue:

AT&T Network Outage: Impact on Public Safety Services by Jill C. Gallagher and Colby Leigh Rachfal (March 13, 2024)

file: https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf103_atandtnetworkoutage_gallagher_es_128kb.mp3 (13:44)
text: https://crsreports.congress.gov/product/pdf/IF/IF12613

Neither author is in our database and they do not have Wikipedia pages on them. However, I was able to find some information on them that might be useful in making their LibriVox author pages:

The report lists them both as "Specialists in Telecommunications Policy".

I also found their LinkedIn pages:
Jill C. Gallagher: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jill-gallagher-a663759
Colby Leigh Rachfal: https://www.linkedin.com/in/colby-rachfal-pechtol-j-d-a4419a80
Elsie :9:
Like Sweden and coming of age stories? Read for Pelle the Conqueror
Like travelogues and Anthony Trollope? Read for The West Indies and the Spanish Main
Shadowland: October, 1919: 4 roles left
Good Words: 1870: 7 roles left
Sue Anderson
Posts: 5213
Joined: July 24th, 2008, 11:48 am
Location: Midwest, USA

Post by Sue Anderson »

elsieselwyn wrote: March 16th, 2024, 2:42 pm Here is one for you, Sue:

AT&T Network Outage: Impact on Public Safety Services by Jill C. Gallagher and Colby Leigh Rachfal (March 13, 2024)

file: https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf103_atandtnetworkoutage_gallagher_es_128kb.mp3 (13:44)
text: https://crsreports.congress.gov/product/pdf/IF/IF12613

Neither author is in our database and they do not have Wikipedia pages on them. However, I was able to find some information on them that might be useful in making their LibriVox author pages:

The report lists them both as "Specialists in Telecommunications Policy".

I also found their LinkedIn pages:
Jill C. Gallagher: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jill-gallagher-a663759
Colby Leigh Rachfal: https://www.linkedin.com/in/colby-rachfal-pechtol-j-d-a4419a80
Hi Elsie, I see you are making good use of the Congressional Research Service Reports--and that "Israel and Hamas Conflict in Brief" is already cataloged. I'm sure it is a useful contribution to LibriVox. :D

Your current read, the ATT Network Outage, is PL OK! :thumbs:

As to my reaction to the contents of this report detailing what went wrong with 911 when ATT went down: what a mess... unbelievable... and no quick solution in sight!!! :evil:

I remember when 911 was inaugurated (1968) and how it was touted as simple to use, saving time, saving lives. Compare that to the descriptions of "workarounds" to 911 described in the report--try, for instance, the description of the "SOS feature" on an iPhone. "When calling 911 in SOS mode, an iPhone caller receives a text response with a short multiple-choice questionnaire about the emergency. If the 911 center cannot receive texts [currently 47% of U.S. centers cannot] an emergency services relay center interacts with the caller via text and calls [???] the 911 center to relay the information... users must have an unobstructed line-of-sight connection to a cell tower, which means foliage, buildings, or other obstructions could slow or prevent messages from being sent or received."

Thanks very much for including the links to the linked-in profiles of the report writers. In particular, I thought Jill Gallagher's job history would make good reading for a younger woman wondering "what was out there" in the way of work...

Many thanks for getting volume 103 off to a great start with the ATT outage story! :D
niobium
Posts: 674
Joined: August 15th, 2015, 9:49 pm

Post by niobium »

The Measurement of Musical Talent
Author(s): Carl E. Seashore
Source: The Musical Quarterly, Vol. 1, No. 1 (Jan., 1915), pp. 129-148
Published by: Oxford University Press
Stable URL: https://www.jstor.org/stable/738047

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf103_themeasurementofmusiclatalents_seashore_lh_128kb.mp3
00:44:23
Sue Anderson
Posts: 5213
Joined: July 24th, 2008, 11:48 am
Location: Midwest, USA

Post by Sue Anderson »

niobium wrote: March 19th, 2024, 2:30 am The Measurement of Musical Talent
Author(s): Carl E. Seashore
Source: The Musical Quarterly, Vol. 1, No. 1 (Jan., 1915), pp. 129-148
Published by: Oxford University Press
Stable URL: https://www.jstor.org/stable/738047

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf103_themeasurementofmusiclatalents_seashore_lh_128kb.mp3
00:44:23
Hi Niobium, Thank you for this monograph depicting the benefits of testing the individual's ability to perceive musical pitch, rhythm etc. and thus clarify their latent talent, or lack of it, for music. These tests "require a specialist trained in music and psychology and will tend to open a new profession--that of a consulting psychologist in music." I was particularly interested in Seashore's contention that no-one really has "absolute pitch."

As to your reading style, Niobium, it reminds me a little in this recording of improvisational jazz. The reading provides a "feeling for the subject matter," there's no doubt of that, but there are a great many deviations from the actual text. Many of these are misreads, where you mistake one word for another [for instance: "occasionally" for "conscious"] Some are pronunciation errors, which obfuscate the text [see list below]. Then there are times when you create new words, as interesting as they are frustrating to the proof listener. ["The next step is to co-liberate the results" for "collate the results."]

In 44 minutes of recording time, I would, as DPL, hope to encounter no more than one or at most two misreads per 10 minutes of recording time. You have substantially more than that. I think, as a general comment, that reading the text out loud to yourself before you record, marking the difficult passages, looking up the words you are not sure of, etc. would, over time, improve your recording skills.

What I am going to ask for in the way of making this text pl ok is a very short list of especially needed corrections. I am appending to this, for your future reference, a list of mispronounced words.

EDITS NEEDED ON THIS RECORDING:

Page 133

at 8:26, text reads "The standard fork, which is duplicated, has a pitch of 435 vibrations, a', international pitch." You said "has a pitch of 434 vibrations, a', internal pitch.

pages 134-5

Text reads "In pitch discrimination, stripped of all vagueness and confusion, we have a quantitative measure of the magnitude of this one factor, and can get a clear cut picture of the distribution of individual differences in this specific capacity."

You said, "...we have a qualitative measure ... get a clear cut picture of the discrimination of individual differences..."

page 144, at 35.37

Text reads "When the plan of these charts is once familiar and the measurements are known, these graphs form striking pictures which convey to us an immediate representation of the features of musical traits or capacities quite as naturally as a photograph conveys the type of physical features." You said "phonograph conveys..."

For Future Recordings, Please Check the Pronunciation of These Words: You don't need to correct them for this recording.

8:03:50, 14:35.5 "apparatus" https://translate.google.com/?sl=en&tl=fr&text=apparatus&op=translate
8:15.5 apparatus; 31.41; 41:22

14:11 "cognitive" https://translate.google.com/?sl=en&tl=fr&text=cognitive%0A&op=translate

18:25.60 "certainty" https://translate.google.com/?sl=en&tl=fr&text=certainty%0A&op=translate

18:35 "facetious" https://translate.google.com/?sl=en&tl=fr&text=facetious%0A&op=translate


25:23 "vary" https://translate.google.com/details?sl=en&tl=fr&text=vary%0A&op=translate

op. cit. (You say "open citation) https://translate.google.com/details?sl=en&tl=fr&text=op.%20cit.%0A&op=translate
in the work already cited.

"Monog." = "monograph"

Thanks again, for contributing to the SNF. Your contribution to vol. 103 will be pl ok. when you have completed the edits on the short list above. Thank you,
elsieselwyn
Posts: 3410
Joined: March 28th, 2019, 8:37 pm
Location: Ohio, USA

Post by elsieselwyn »

Here is my second contribution to the collection, in keeping with the theme of emergency response systems:

The American Fire-Alarm Telegraph by William F. Channing (1855)

file: https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf103_americanfirealarmtelegraph_channing_es_128kb.mp3 (28:33)
text: https://archive.org/details/americanfirealar00chan/mode/1up

Author information: https://www.nps.gov/people/william-f-channing.htm (b. 1820-d. 1901)
Elsie :9:
Like Sweden and coming of age stories? Read for Pelle the Conqueror
Like travelogues and Anthony Trollope? Read for The West Indies and the Spanish Main
Shadowland: October, 1919: 4 roles left
Good Words: 1870: 7 roles left
Sue Anderson
Posts: 5213
Joined: July 24th, 2008, 11:48 am
Location: Midwest, USA

Post by Sue Anderson »

elsieselwyn wrote: March 20th, 2024, 8:25 am Here is my second contribution to the collection, in keeping with the theme of emergency response systems:

The American Fire-Alarm Telegraph by William F. Channing (1855)

file: https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf103_americanfirealarmtelegraph_channing_es_128kb.mp3 (28:33)
text: https://archive.org/details/americanfirealar00chan/mode/1up

Author information: https://www.nps.gov/people/william-f-channing.htm (b. 1820-d. 1901)
Hi Elsie, Thanks for this description of an innovative centralized fire alarm system! :D Thanks also for the biographical information on William F. Channing! It was helpful to me in sorting out the members of this distinguished family. viewtopic.php?t=102138

PL OK! :thumbs:
Sue Anderson
Posts: 5213
Joined: July 24th, 2008, 11:48 am
Location: Midwest, USA

Post by Sue Anderson »

Hi, Here is one from me:

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf103_outdoorpainting_smith_sa_128kb.mp3

Outdoor Sketching, Four Talks Given Before the Art Institute of Chicago, the Scammon Lectures, 1914 [Excerpt]
by Francis Hopkinson Smith
26:19
https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/27340


Francis Hopkinson Smith (1838-1915) was a fantastic plein air painter! He claims in this talk, given at the Art Institute of Chicago, that almost all his watercolor views were done in one outdoor sitting, with nothing but a white umbrella and a 3-legged stool the "sum of his studio appointments."

His views of Venice, in particular, are marvelously atmospheric.
https://www.google.com/search?q=francis+Hopkinson+Smith+painter&rlz=1C1CHBF_enUS871US871&oq=francis+hopkins&gs_lcrp=EgZjaHJvbWUqBggAEEUYOzIGCAAQRRg7MgYIARBFGDkyBggCEEUYPDIGCAMQRRhBMgYIBBBFGEHSAQk1MzA2ajBqMTWoAgCwAgA&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8 Painting was Hopkinson Smith's vocation, but not his profession. His "day job" was as an engineer and contractor in New York City. Among his projects was the the foundation structure for the Statue of Liberty.

My recording is an excerpt from his talk. It includes the following paragraphs from Gutenberg: 3-5, 15, 18-35, and the exclamation from 36.

~~~~~~ I am looking for a volunteer to proof listen (PL) this for me, since as dedicated proof listener (DPL) of the Short Nonfiction Collection (SNF), I cannot very well PL my own work. My thanks in advance. :)
elsieselwyn
Posts: 3410
Joined: March 28th, 2019, 8:37 pm
Location: Ohio, USA

Post by elsieselwyn »

Sue Anderson wrote: March 20th, 2024, 5:11 pm Hi, Here is one from me:

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf103_outdoorpainting_smith_sa_128kb.mp3

Outdoor Sketching, Four Talks Given Before the Art Institute of Chicago, the Scammon Lectures, 1914 [Excerpt]
by Francis Hopkinson Smith
26:19
https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/27340


Francis Hopkinson Smith (1838-1915) was a fantastic plein air painter! He claims in this talk, given at the Art Institute of Chicago, that almost all his watercolor views were done in one outdoor sitting, with nothing but a white umbrella and a 3-legged stool the "sum of his studio appointments."

His views of Venice, in particular, are marvelously atmospheric.
https://www.google.com/search?q=francis+Hopkinson+Smith+painter&rlz=1C1CHBF_enUS871US871&oq=francis+hopkins&gs_lcrp=EgZjaHJvbWUqBggAEEUYOzIGCAAQRRg7MgYIARBFGDkyBggCEEUYPDIGCAMQRRhBMgYIBBBFGEHSAQk1MzA2ajBqMTWoAgCwAgA&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8 Painting was Hopkinson Smith's vocation, but not his profession. His "day job" was as an engineer and contractor in New York City. Among his projects was the the foundation structure for the Statue of Liberty.

My recording is an excerpt from his talk. It includes the following paragraphs from Gutenberg: 3-5, 15, 18-35, and the exclamation from 36.

~~~~~~ I am looking for a volunteer to proof listen (PL) this for me, since as dedicated proof listener (DPL) of the Short Nonfiction Collection (SNF), I cannot very well PL my own work. My thanks in advance. :)
I had time to PL it. It is PL OK :thumbs:
Elsie :9:
Like Sweden and coming of age stories? Read for Pelle the Conqueror
Like travelogues and Anthony Trollope? Read for The West Indies and the Spanish Main
Shadowland: October, 1919: 4 roles left
Good Words: 1870: 7 roles left
Sue Anderson
Posts: 5213
Joined: July 24th, 2008, 11:48 am
Location: Midwest, USA

Post by Sue Anderson »

Thanks for the listen, Elsie! Much appreciated! :D
niobium
Posts: 674
Joined: August 15th, 2015, 9:49 pm

Post by niobium »

A trial of mental and pedagogical tests in a civil service examination for policemen and firemen.

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf103_trialofmentalandpedagogicaltestsinacivilserviceexaminationforpoliceand_firemen_terman_lh_128kb.mp3

Journal of Applied Psychology, 1917. By Lewis Terman

Also updated the measurement of musical talents and ready for a spot check
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