Short Nonfiction Collection, Vol. 104 - jo

Short Poetry Collections, Short Story Collections, and our Weekly Poetry Project
Sue Anderson
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Joined: July 24th, 2008, 11:48 am
Location: Midwest, USA

Post by Sue Anderson »

Note: knotyouraveragejo is Metacoordinator (MC); Sue Anderson is Book Coordinator and Dedicated Proof Listener (BC, DPL).

Short Nonfiction Collection, Vol. 104

This is an ongoing collection of short nonfiction works in English, chosen by the readers, which are in the Public Domain (generally meaning that they were published prior to 1929). Nonfiction includes essays and speeches; letters and diaries; biography and history; film, book and music reviews; descriptions of travel; politics and sports; instructional manuals; even a favorite recipe from a Public Domain cookbook! Your recording can be on any topic. Some suggestions for source material can be found here.

For clarification of what "in the Public Domain" means read this. Try to stay with works that run less than 60 minutes [74 minutes is the absolute max]. You may read a maximum of 2 selections per volume. There is no need to sign-up before recording, as long as the work is clearly in the Public Domain. But please note: Transcriptions of public domain texts published on the web by sites other than Gutenberg.org CAN NOT be used as sources! Specifically, Wikisource CAN NOT be used as a source. See "Our policy on text sources."

After 20 recordings are submitted, we will prooflisten, catalog and make them available to the public.

Basic Recording Guide: http://wiki.librivox.org/index.php/Newbie_Guide_to_Recording

1. RECORD:
  • Be sure to set your recording software to: 44100Hz, 32-bit.
  • At the BEGINNING say: "[Title of Work], by [Author Name]" "This is a Librivox recording. All Librivox recordings are in the public domain. For more information or to volunteer, please visit Librivox.org"
  • At the END, say: "End of [Title], by [Author Name]"
  • If you wish, you may also say: "Read by...your name."
  • Please leave no more than 1 second of silence at the beginning of your recording. Add about 5 seconds of silence at the end of your recording.
2. EDIT and SAVE your file:
  • Need noise-cleaning? See this LibriVox wiki page for a complete guide.
  • Save or export your recording to an mp3 file at 128kbs constant bit rate. The uploader will add the .mp3 to the end of your file name when it uploads. Please use the format shown. Your file name should have this format before you upload it:

    snf104_titleofwork_authorlastname_yourinitials_128kb
  • After it is uploaded, it should have this format:
    https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf104_titleofwork_authorlastname_yourinitials_128kb.mp3
  • FILE NAMES HAVE RULES!
    Just a word or two to identify the title. Omit "a," "the," etc. Author's LAST NAME only. Everything lower case, including author's last name & your initials!
3. UPLOAD your recording:
  • Upload your finished recording using the LibriVox uploader: http://librivox.org/login/uploader. When your upload is complete, you will receive a link - copy and post it to the current nonfiction thread. If you don't post that you've uploaded your recording, the nonfiction book coordinator won't know that you did it!
    Image
  • If you have trouble reading the image above, please send a private message to any admin.
  • To upload, you'll need to select the MC, which for the Short Nonfiction Collection is: knotyouraveragejo
  • If this doesn't work, or you have questions, please check our How To Send Your Recording wiki page
4. POST the following information in this thread:
  • Title of the work.
  • Author of the work.
  • The link to your file you copied from the uploader.
  • A URL link to the source from which you read (etext URL). If posting from Gutenberg, please provide the link to the download page, e.g. http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/# (where # is the Gutenberg project number for the book). Note: WikiSource is not accepted as a source for a recording.
  • Length in minutes.
  • If this is your first Librivox recording, we will also need your name as you would like it to appear in the LibriVox catalog, and, if you have a web page and want it linked to your name in the catalog, the URL of the web page.
5. PROOF LISTENING AND DEADLINE FOR EDITS on recordings you have submitted:
  • The SNF Collection has SPECIAL STANDARDS for PLing, which reflect our concern for accuracy in reading nonfiction material.
  • We proof listen for the following:
    • Has the recording passed "Checker?" [set on "Gentle Validation," to check File Names and Technical Specifications only]. This LibriVox app looks for common problems associated with LibriVox recordings. https://wiki.librivox.org/index.php/Checker
    • Does the recording have errors that change the meaning of the text? This includes words accidentally added, omitted, mispronounced, or misread!
    • Does the recording have the LibriVox intro? Are there any long silences or pauses, stumbles or repeats that need to be edited out? Are there 5 seconds of silence at the end of the recording?
  • We ask that you complete any editing requested by the Dedicated Proof Listener within two weeks of the request, or, if you need more time, that you post in this thread to request an extension. There’s no shame in this; we’re all volunteers and things happen. Extensions are, however, at the discretion of the Book Coordinator. To be fair to the other readers, sections which cannot be edited in a timely manner will be deleted from the current volume of the Nonfiction Collection, but they can always be included in a future volume when the edits are complete.

Magic Window:



BC Admin
Sue Anderson
Posts: 5242
Joined: July 24th, 2008, 11:48 am
Location: Midwest, USA

Post by Sue Anderson »

Welcome to Volume 104 of the Short Nonfiction Collection. This is a place to share a special interest by recording a short work of public domain nonfiction. If you haven't something already in mind that you'd like to record, there are many bookshelves at Gutenberg.org to explore http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/bookshelf/. The bookshelves for Countries, Education, Fine Arts, History, Music, Periodicals, and Technology are some places to start.

Hathi Trust and Archive.org are good resources:

https://archive.org/
https://www.hathitrust.org/

The Online Books Page has over 2 million PD listings! It was suggested by LibriVoxer Soupy.
http://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/lists.html

The Congressional Research Service publishes articles on recent events, U.S. law, U.S. policy, the economy, international politics, etc. here: https://crsreports.congress.gov/search/#/?termsToSearch=&orderBy=Date.
If you narrow by "Resources" and/or "Posts", you will get a lot of short articles that would be well-suited for this Short Nonfiction Collection.
This suggestion came from LibriVoxer elsieselwyn.

The Biodiversity Heritage Library is a great source for natural history. It was suggested by LibriVoxer MillionMoments. http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/

Please note: Transcriptions of public domain texts published on the web by sites other than Gutenberg.org CAN NOT be used as sources! Specifically, Wikisource CAN NOT be used as a source. See "Our policy on text sources." If you are interested in reading a text you have found on Wikisource, I will be happy to help you locate an alternative reading source. Just post me a query on the thread.

If you have any doubts about the public domain status of anything you want to read for the collection, please feel free to post the source along with your query in the thread, and I will be glad to help you! Thanks!

Please note: There is a limit of two selections per reader for this volume of Short Nonfiction.

Please check the File Name and Technical Specifications of your recording with Checker https://wiki.librivox.org/index.php/Checker before sending it up to the Nonfiction Collection! :) Checker is an easy to use "open source tool that looks for common problems with recordings for LibriVox... Checker saves time by checking contributions for common issues before files are uploaded." Thanks! :) :)

Sue (Book Coordinator, Short Nonfiction Collection)
Steve
Posts: 718
Joined: April 29th, 2012, 8:54 am
Location: Norwich England

Post by Steve »

A short piece about an early British female freedom fighter, who is (to quote from numerous sources) 'considered to be a British national heroine and a symbol of the struggle for justice and independence.'

Boadicea – Queen of the Iceni

Anna Jameson (1794 – 1860)

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf104_boadicea_jameson_scc_128kb.mp3

16:17

Taken from the book: Lives of celebrated female sovereigns and illustrious women [1870]

https://archive.org/details/livesofcelebrate00jamerich/page/36/mode/2up

Cheers

Steve
Sue Anderson
Posts: 5242
Joined: July 24th, 2008, 11:48 am
Location: Midwest, USA

Post by Sue Anderson »

Steve wrote: June 2nd, 2024, 2:47 am A short piece about an early British female freedom fighter, who is (to quote from numerous sources) 'considered to be a British national heroine and a symbol of the struggle for justice and independence.'

Boadicea – Queen of the Iceni

Anna Jameson (1794 – 1860)

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf104_boadicea_jameson_scc_128kb.mp3

16:17

Taken from the book: Lives of celebrated female sovereigns and illustrious women [1870]

https://archive.org/details/livesofcelebrate00jamerich/page/36/mode/2up

Cheers

Steve
Hi Steve, Thanks for getting vol. 104 off to a great start! :D Boadicea is, I would gather, a "foundational female heroine," in British history. U.S. history has Pocahontas...

It's funny how things build on each other in the Short Nonfiction Collection. After listening intently to your recording, I went to Wikipedia to learn more about Boadicea. and what immediately caught my attention was a reproduction of John Opie's painting "Boadicea Haranguing the Britons." Rapunzelina had just read a bio of Opie for vol. 103! https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boudica

Your selection was well read and PL OK! :thumbs:
lightcrystal
Posts: 1308
Joined: October 22nd, 2021, 10:55 pm
Location: Melbourne with kangaroos

Post by lightcrystal »

I'd like to repeat a suggestion that I made a few weeks ago in the suggestions thread: The CHIPS Act. I am not allowed to do this. But as a geek I'd like someone American to do it through your Congressional library resources.

This is a hard one to find because there are many acts that have similar names. But I think that the act here is:

https://www.congress.gov/bill/117th-congress/house-bill/4346

It had different names. Earlier it was the chips for America act. Here it's the Chips and Science Act. Not sure how to find the reports that someone would read here; there would have been a report for this for sure. [by the way as a point of history there are similar acts going back to 1982 about the US manufacture of semi-conductor chips.]

TLDR: The CHIPS act aims to make the US self-reliant on semi-conductors/computer chips by 2030. Basically to prevent a "Red Dawn" scenario where another country has backdoored the chips, turns them off all over the US, and does whatever it likes while the US economy is wrecked. This is a race against time. It is extremely difficult to make semi-conductors.
What is a logging company run by cats? A catalog.
Sue Anderson
Posts: 5242
Joined: July 24th, 2008, 11:48 am
Location: Midwest, USA

Post by Sue Anderson »

lightcrystal wrote: June 3rd, 2024, 1:19 pm I'd like to repeat a suggestion that I made a few weeks ago in the suggestions thread: The CHIPS Act. I am not allowed to do this. But as a geek I'd like someone American to do it through your Congressional library resources.

This is a hard one to find because there are many acts that have similar names. But I think that the act here is:

https://www.congress.gov/bill/117th-congress/house-bill/4346

It had different names. Earlier it was the chips for America act. Here it's the Chips and Science Act. Not sure how to find the reports that someone would read here; there would have been a report for this for sure. [by the way as a point of history there are similar acts going back to 1982 about the US manufacture of semi-conductor chips.]

TLDR: The CHIPS act aims to make the US self-reliant on semi-conductors/computer chips by 2030. Basically to prevent a "Red Dawn" scenario where another country has backdoored the chips, turns them off all over the US, and does whatever it likes while the US economy is wrecked. This is a race against time. It is extremely difficult to make semi-conductors.
Hi lightcrystal,

The U.S. Congressional Report Service has some analyses of the Chips Act which are Public Domain for readers based in the United States: These include:

Frequently Asked Question: Chips Act of 2022 https://crsreports.congress.gov/product/pdf/R/R47523

Semiconductors and the CHIPS Act: The Global Context: https://crsreports.congress.gov/product/pdf/R/R47558
Steve
Posts: 718
Joined: April 29th, 2012, 8:54 am
Location: Norwich England

Post by Steve »

The Green Children of Woolpit provides the subject for another contribution from my part of the world. (Hope that you'll be able to use it).

Title of the work: Of The Green Children

Author & source of the work:

Original publication (c. 1189): Historia rerum Anglicarum by William of Newburgh

Publication Used: The history of William of Newburgh. The chronicles of Robert de Monte. Translated from the original Latin by the Rev. Joseph Stevenson (1856):

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=msu.31293107297198&seq=60

Link to file: https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf104_greenchildren_stevenson_scc_128kb.mp3

Duration: 6:41

Although over 870 years have elapsed since this event took place (if it did occur during the reign of King Stephen (d. 1154)) and given the rank & status of the gentry, church officials and chroniclers (particularly William of Newburgh & Ralph of Coggeshall) who investigated and independently documented this very unusual story at the time, I would tend to believe that there may be some truth rather than being a pure folktale about the event described.

You will see/hear that I blended in some of the footnotes where I felt it appropriate (& safe!) to do so. :) (Hope that's OK?)

Cheers

Steve
Sue Anderson
Posts: 5242
Joined: July 24th, 2008, 11:48 am
Location: Midwest, USA

Post by Sue Anderson »

Steve wrote: June 9th, 2024, 7:40 am The Green Children of Woolpit provides the subject for another contribution from my part of the world. (Hope that you'll be able to use it).

Title of the work: Of The Green Children

Author & source of the work:

Original publication (c. 1189): Historia rerum Anglicarum by William of Newburgh

Publication Used: The history of William of Newburgh. The chronicles of Robert de Monte. Translated from the original Latin by the Rev. Joseph Stevenson (1856):

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=msu.31293107297198&seq=60

Link to file: https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf104_greenchildren_stevenson_scc_128kb.mp3

Duration: 6:41

Although over 870 years have elapsed since this event took place (if it did occur during the reign of King Stephen (d. 1154)) and given the rank & status of the gentry, church officials and chroniclers (particularly William of Newburgh & Ralph of Coggeshall) who investigated and independently documented this very unusual story at the time, I would tend to believe that there may be some truth rather than being a pure folktale about the event described.

You will see/hear that I blended in some of the footnotes where I felt it appropriate (& safe!) to do so. :) (Hope that's OK?)

Cheers

Steve
Hi Steve, Thanks for this second contribution to vol. 104! :D I can see how someone with an interest in English history could easily become immersed in the details of this story. Per my quick dive into Stephen's rein (1134-1154) courtesy of Wikipedia, it sounds like there was a lot of social disruption in that period due to civil war, which might have accounted for the disorientated and stressed children who emerged from the wolf pit.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen,_King_of_England
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trapping_pit

What's your take on the story?

Your reading is PL OK! :thumbs:
Steve
Posts: 718
Joined: April 29th, 2012, 8:54 am
Location: Norwich England

Post by Steve »

Sue Anderson wrote: June 9th, 2024, 12:35 pm Hi Steve, Thanks for this second contribution to vol. 104! :D I can see how someone with an interest in English history could easily become immersed in the details of this story. Per my quick dive into Stephen's rein (1134-1154) courtesy of Wikipedia, it sounds like there was a lot of social disruption in that period due to civil war, which might have accounted for the disorientated and stressed children who emerged from the wolf pit.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen,_King_of_England
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trapping_pit

What's your take on the story?

Your reading is PL OK! :thumbs:
This period would have certainly been a time of prolonged social upheaval, due to the continuing fallout from the Norman Conquest of Britain in 1066 which saw the defeat of King Harold at the Battle of Hastings by William the Conqueror.

The local population would have been living in a time when the natural order of things was being radically changed as they were required to swear allegiance to newly appointed lords and to live under new laws and social hierarchy brought in by the Normans. Also, the fear engendered in the population by the compiling of the Domesday Book just a few decades before cannot be ignored.

(The English Civil War came along a bit later in around 1650ish and was another cause of social uncertainty & upheaval).

The best take on the story that I have ever come across was one that was expounded to me by an old boy that I got talking to one evening many years ago in a pub not too far from the village of Woolpit.

He was of the opinion that the children were of a Dutch family that had fled for some reason from Holland over to the coast of East Anglia. Maybe they feared for their lives because one of the parents had been accused of witchcraft or maybe one had committed a grave crime that would carry the death penalty. They could well have been given a lift across the North Sea and landed near the coastal town of Felixstowe and followed the River Orwell inland up to Ipswich (14 miles), then carried on and ended up near Woolpit (18 miles further on).

They could then have tucked themselves away knowing that they were unlikely to be disturbed since the indigenous population would tend to keep close to their own settlements for fear of the unknown outside their own boundaries. They could easily keep themselves going by growing their own vegetables and rustling the odd animal occasionally. He thought that since pottage was a staple meal of peasants in that era, the children would have identified beans as the only food source that they trusted and they probably had not had the experience of eating bread. The mention in the story of the clothing made of strange materials & design could also be explained if it had originated on the continent (of Europe).

(As an aside, many Dutch people and especially Flemish weavers fled from persecution to this part of East Anglia in the 15th & 16th centuries where they set up communities and developed businesses in many of the larger towns).

The children must have wandered off from their parents, got themselves lost and fell into one of the numerous wolf pits that surrounded the village. As for the green colour of the children’s skin, my drinking companion speculated that it was probably due to some medical condition rather than being a dye, since the pigmentation apparently did gradually diminish over time, probably through the children having a better diet than they had been used to.

(And yet another aside, a quick Google revealed a number of conditions that could lead to a green pigmentation of the skin - chloro-anaemia being one in particular that I came across).

(And one final aside since I’ve been following a number of internet ‘rabbit holes’ related to this story all morning! It is recorded that the children spoke of ‘St. Martin’ and again following various links on the web, there may be a connection with Sint Maarten who has been celebrated for hundreds of years in Holland with a festival annually on 11 November – but this is pure speculation on my part!).

So, I reckon I’ll buy into the old chap’s theory – it sounds far more plausible than the ‘little green men from Mars’ or the ‘subterranean dwellers’ alternatives! :)

Cheers

Steve
Sue Anderson
Posts: 5242
Joined: July 24th, 2008, 11:48 am
Location: Midwest, USA

Post by Sue Anderson »

Steve, Wow... thanks for your elaboration on the green children! :D It seems to me that one thing the old chap in the pub missed adding to his story was a "Romulus and Remus" angle--foundlings nurtured by a she wolf... :lol:

Cheers!
DrSpoke
Posts: 1173
Joined: January 12th, 2022, 9:56 am

Post by DrSpoke »

Hello there, here comes my contribution:

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf104_ourpresentfuturepolicyholyland_graves_cc_128kb.mp3
31:42

Source: https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015048491156&seq=301
by Philip Graves (Philip Perceval Graves), 1876-1953
Published 1924

I haven't done much recording lately and felt out of practice when reading this text. If you think my acquired blend of English possibly confusing now, maybe Alister might be willing to read this with his very elegant British English?
Sue Anderson
Posts: 5242
Joined: July 24th, 2008, 11:48 am
Location: Midwest, USA

Post by Sue Anderson »

DrSpoke wrote: June 12th, 2024, 4:47 am Hello there, here comes my contribution:

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf104_ourpresentfuturepolicyholyland_graves_cc_128kb.mp3
31:42

Source: https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015048491156&seq=301
by Philip Graves (Philip Perceval Graves), 1876-1953
Published 1924

I haven't done much recording lately and felt out of practice when reading this text. If you think my acquired blend of English possibly confusing now, maybe Alister might be willing to read this with his very elegant British English?
Hi DrSpoke, Thanks for reading Philip P. Graves' "Our Present and Future Policy in the Holy Land." :D Graves' exposition of core issues is an excellent addition to your "Colonization of Palestine--the Unit System" (SNF vol. 101) and Grothmann's "The Balfour Declaration" in vol. 102:

https://archive.org/details/snf101_2312_librivox/snf101_colonizationpalestine_kazmann_cc_128kb.mp3

https://archive.org/details/snf102_2403_librivox/snf102_balfourdeclaration_balfour_dg_128kb.mp3

I was amazed at Graves' prescience about what could go wrong in Palestine -- published "so early on" (1924). "...by the Balfour Declaration and the Mandate, Great Britain has committed herself to a very delicate and quite unprecedented political experiment -- viz., the partial colonization of conquered country with settlers belonging neither to the conquered nor to the conquering race, in such a manner as not to injure the political and other rights of the the native population..." (page 239).

Your "blended English" might make AI work a wee bit harder to hack your voice, and that's all to the better!

PL OK! :thumbs:
Veggrower
Posts: 709
Joined: February 25th, 2010, 9:12 am
Location: Devon, England

Post by Veggrower »

Hi,

An essay concerning a famous English outlaw, Robin Hood, which seems to give a pretty convincing case for the legend to have been based on the life of a real person.

"A Search for Robin Hood", by Anonymous.

MP3 link: https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf104_robinhood_anonymous_gln_128kb.mp3

Source: https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/22187

Length: 30:54

Thanks,
Garth
Sue Anderson
Posts: 5242
Joined: July 24th, 2008, 11:48 am
Location: Midwest, USA

Post by Sue Anderson »

Veggrower wrote: June 14th, 2024, 1:00 pm Hi,

An essay concerning a famous English outlaw, Robin Hood, which seems to give a pretty convincing case for the legend to have been based on the life of a real person.

"A Search for Robin Hood", by Anonymous.

MP3 link: https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf104_robinhood_anonymous_gln_128kb.mp3

Source: https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/22187

Length: 30:54

Thanks,
Garth
Hi Garth, Thanks for reading about antiquarian Reverend Joseph Hunter's attempt to discover the "real" Robin Hood! :D https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Hunter_(antiquarian)

According to Wikipedia, there are "at least eight plausible origins" to the Robin Hood story, so I suppose we can't say that Joseph Hunter's research was definitive. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robin_Hood. But I liked the way Hunter used his sources, how he started with clues found in the ballads, such as the mention of a King Edward, and worked out from there. All in all, his research was impressive!

According to the Rev. Hunter's bio in Wikipedia, he was awarded a coat of arms in 1843 and chose as his motto "Vita si Cervina" (avoid me if you are a deer). I imagine he was thinking of his hero, Robin Hood, when he did that...

Well read, and PL OK! :thumbs:
niobium
Posts: 701
Joined: August 15th, 2015, 9:49 pm

Post by niobium »

Some Practical Applications of Psychology in Government by Harold F. Gosnell.
Source: American Journal of Sociology , May, 1923, Vol. 28, No. 6 (May, 1923), pp. 735-743
Published by: The University of Chicago Press
Stable URL: https://www.jstor.org/stable/2764579
Time :19 minutes
https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf104_somepracticalapplicationsofpsychologyingovernment_gosnell_lhs_128kb.mp3
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