Short Nonfiction Collection, Vol. 064 - jo

Short Poetry Collections, Short Story Collections, and our Weekly Poetry Project
soupy
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Post by soupy » March 13th, 2019, 2:00 pm

Thanks Bob :D

Good advice for everyone.

the night cometh when no man can work
Jonh 9.4

PLOK

Craig
“Drink waters from thine own well.” Proverbs 5:15
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Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » March 14th, 2019, 1:41 pm

Hi, here is one from me:
William Kilburn (1745-1818) and Copyright for Artists' Original Designs
from Gentleman's Magazine, London, 1832

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf064_kilburn_anonymous_sa_128kb.mp3
9:15

https://books.google.com/books?id=x_lfAAAAcAAJ&pg=PA222&dq=william+kilburn&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiwiYLBmoLhAhUGM6wKHbuGAJMQ6AEIWjAJ#v=onepage&q=william%20kilburn&f=false

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Kilburn

William Kilburn was a watercolor artist, engraver, and textile designer. His sumptuous floral designs can be viewed on-line courtesy of the V & A museum: https://collections.vam.ac.uk/search/?listing_type=&offset=0&limit=15&narrow=&extrasearch=&q=william+kilburn&commit=Search&quality=1&objectnamesearch=&placesearch=&after=&before=&namesearch=&materialsearch=&mnsearch=&locationsearch=

Kilburn was one of the first artists to fight for copyright for his original designs, which were being knocked-off in rival textile factories in as little as 10-days! Kilburn's 1797 testimony before the House of Commons led to the passage, in 1798, of one of the earliest copyright acts for printed cotton designs: https://www.jstor.org/stable/871159?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents.

soupy
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Post by soupy » March 14th, 2019, 2:39 pm

Thanks for the information about William Kilburn his copyright problems. A nice piece of history.

PLOK :thumbs:

Craig
“Drink waters from thine own well.” Proverbs 5:15
Such books are mirrors: when an ape peers into them, no apostle can be looking out. Lichtenberg
My Website
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lurcherlover
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Post by lurcherlover » March 16th, 2019, 5:51 am

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf064_conclusion_paine_pt_128kb.mp3

The Age of Reason - Chapter 3 - Conclusion - by Thomas Paine (1737-1809)
Duration:33:23
32.05MB

Source: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/31270/31270-h/31270-h.htm#Elink2HCH0021

Not quite what I expected for various reasons. Interesting, although he is making assumptions as in "the universe as well as the Almighty."

He certainly has a go at organised religion and "revelation" and considers the Christian Bible as rubbish and lies, and in that I can agree.

He never really comes out and admits his own beliefs or lack of beliefs - maybe because he would expose himself to danger? So maybe his book in four parts should be called "The Age of some reason." But there are many ways of exposing oneself to danger, and religion and politics are the most obvious.

Just my thoughts on this - people will probably disagree.
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Post by Sue Anderson » March 16th, 2019, 6:52 am

lurcherlover wrote:
March 16th, 2019, 5:51 am
https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf064_conclusion_paine_pt_128kb.mp3

The Age of Reason - Chapter 3 - Conclusion - by Thomas Paine (1737-1809)

Not quite what I expected for various reasons. Interesting, although he is making assumptions as in "the universe as well as the Almighty."

He certainly has a go at organised religion and "revelation" and considers the Christian Bible as rubbish and lies, and in that I can agree.

He never really comes out and admits his own beliefs or lack of beliefs - maybe because he would expose himself to danger? So maybe his book in four parts should be called "The Age of some reason." But there are many ways of exposing oneself to danger, and religion and politics are the most obvious.

Just my thoughts on this - people will probably disagree.
Thank you for your contribution to vol. 64, lurcherlover! :) The search for answers is never ending; I think many listeners will tune in to find out what Thomas Paine had to say.

soupy
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Post by soupy » March 16th, 2019, 2:14 pm

A very modern argument from Mr Paine. Thanks lurchlover :D

Reading is Ok. However you misprounced Longinus

28:08 Longinus calls this expression the sublime; and by the same rule the conjurer is sublime too; for the manner of speaking is expressively and grammatically the same.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Longinus
[lon-jahy-nuh s]

Craig
“Drink waters from thine own well.” Proverbs 5:15
Such books are mirrors: when an ape peers into them, no apostle can be looking out. Lichtenberg
My Website
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Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » March 16th, 2019, 3:26 pm

soupy wrote:
March 16th, 2019, 2:14 pm
A very modern argument from Mr Paine. Thanks lurchlover :D

Reading is Ok. However you misprounced Longinus

28:08 Longinus calls this expression the sublime; and by the same rule the conjurer is sublime too; for the manner of speaking is expressively and grammatically the same.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Longinus
[lon-jahy-nuh s]

Craig
I'd say more a regional variation pronunciation on Longinus. Let's call it PL Ok.

soupy
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Post by soupy » March 16th, 2019, 4:39 pm

ok
“Drink waters from thine own well.” Proverbs 5:15
Such books are mirrors: when an ape peers into them, no apostle can be looking out. Lichtenberg
My Website
Kierkegaards Challenge

lurcherlover
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Post by lurcherlover » Yesterday, 1:05 am

Many thanks - I had never heard of "Longinus" before. I suppose I should have looked him up first! Ignorance is bliss.

I see now that he was an Italian soldier with a lance, although can't see why he's so admired if he killed JC? I must be missing something. "Longinus calls this expression the sublime." I don't really understand that in the context of Moses and conjurer's rods etc. A lot of this is way above my head!
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Lady Astor to Churchill "If I were married to you I would probably put poison in your tea."
Churchill to Lady Astor "And if I were married to you I would probably drink it."

soupy
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Post by soupy » Yesterday, 4:06 am

It seems I sent you to the wrong link. Too many Longinus' :)

Longinus or Pseudo-Longinus (c. 1st century), conventional names for the author of On the Sublime

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/On_the_Sublime

The treatise highlights examples of good and bad writing from the previous millennium, focusing particularly on what may lead to the sublime.

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/17957

Earth rent from its foundations! Tartarus itself laid bare! The whole world torn asunder and turned upside down! Why, my dear friend, this is a perfect hurly-burly, in which the whole universe, heaven and hell, mortals and immortals, share the conflict and the peril.

It looks like a good read for librivox.

Craig
“Drink waters from thine own well.” Proverbs 5:15
Such books are mirrors: when an ape peers into them, no apostle can be looking out. Lichtenberg
My Website
Kierkegaards Challenge

lurcherlover
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Post by lurcherlover » Yesterday, 4:49 am

soupy wrote:
Yesterday, 4:06 am

Earth rent from its foundations! Tartarus itself laid bare! The whole world torn asunder and turned upside down! Why, my dear friend, this is a perfect hurly-burly, in which the whole universe, heaven and hell, mortals and immortals, share the conflict and the peril.

It looks like a good read for librivox.

Craig
Not for me! Far too obscure and above my head, and it's full of Greek letters. I may have a close friend who is Greek but I wouldn't ask her for help, it's all too complicated and time consuming. I should really stick to short stories which I can (usually) just about understand.

Peter
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Lady Astor to Churchill "If I were married to you I would probably put poison in your tea."
Churchill to Lady Astor "And if I were married to you I would probably drink it."

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » Yesterday, 5:38 am

The introduction to Longinus' On the Sublime is an accessible and interesting read (said having just read it!).

[Longinus] must have come into the world about 213 A.D. He travelled much, studied in many cities, and was the friend of the mystic Neoplatonists, Plotinus and Ammonius. The former called him “a philologist, not a philosopher.” Porphyry shows us Longinus at a supper where the plagiarisms of Greek writers are discussed—a topic dear to trivial or spiteful mediocrity. He is best known by his death. As the Greek secretary of Zenobia he inspired a haughty answer from the queen to Aurelian, who therefore put him to death.

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/17957/17957-h/17957-h.htm

soupy
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Post by soupy » Yesterday, 1:37 pm

“Drink waters from thine own well.” Proverbs 5:15
Such books are mirrors: when an ape peers into them, no apostle can be looking out. Lichtenberg
My Website
Kierkegaards Challenge

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » Yesterday, 4:24 pm

soupy wrote:
Yesterday, 1:37 pm
On The Social Element in Religion 1799
Friedrich Schleiermacher 1768-1834 Translated by George Ripley

Craig
Hi Craig, Thank you for this contribution to vol 64. It looks as if this will be the first selection in English from Schleiermacher's theology in the catalog.

There are only two places that need correction. Since Gutenberg doesn't have page numbers accompanying the text, I'll give you the first sentence of the paragraphs.

22:53: First sentence: "How then could the Spirit of discord and division..." In sentence: "for the degrees of this affinity imperceptibly diminish and increase..." Text reads "affinity;" it sounded to me as if you said "infinity."


26:56: First sentence: "If unbounded universality of insight be the first and original supposition of religion..." Last sentence of paragraph: "outlines that become more and more indistinct." Text reads "indistinct;" you said "distinct."

Otherwise ok.

soupy
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Post by soupy » Yesterday, 6:17 pm

“Drink waters from thine own well.” Proverbs 5:15
Such books are mirrors: when an ape peers into them, no apostle can be looking out. Lichtenberg
My Website
Kierkegaards Challenge

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