COMPLETE: Short Nonfiction Collection, Vol. 060 - jo

Solo or group recordings that are finished and fully available for listeners
Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » September 15th, 2018, 2:20 pm

FULL: Short Nonfiction Collection Vol. 060

This project is now complete. All audio files can be found on the catalog page.

https://librivox.org/short-nonfiction-collection-vol-060-by-various/

This collection is dedicated to recordings of short nonfiction works in English which are in the Public Domain (generally meaning that they were published prior to 1923). Nonfiction includes essays and speeches; letters and diaries; biography and history; film, book and music reviews; descriptions of travel, politics and sports; instructional manuals, even a favorite recipe from a public domain cookbook! Your nonfiction recording can be on any topic. Some suggestions for source material can be found here.

Please select and record any short nonfiction piece in the public domain. For clarification of what it means for a work to be "in the public domain," please see this section of the LibriVox Wiki: http://wiki.librivox.org/index.php/Copyright_and_Public_Domain. Try to stay with works that run less than 60 minutes. You may read up to 3 selections per volume. There is no need to "sign-up" before recording; as long as the work is clearly in the public domain, just start recording. Multiple versions are always welcome, so don't worry whether someone else has recorded your selection already; we're happy to hear your version too. :)

After 15-20 recordings are submitted, we will prooflisten, catalog and make them available to the public.

Basic Recording Guide: http://wiki.librivox.org/index.php/Newbie_Guide_to_Recording

1. RECORD:
  • Be sure to set your recording software to: 44100Hz, 16 or 32-bit.
  • At the BEGINNING say: "[Title of Work], by [Author Name]" "This is a Librivox recording. All Librivox recordings are in the public domain. For more information or to volunteer, please visit Librivox.org"
  • At the END, say: "End of [Title], by [Author Name]"
  • If you wish, you may also say: "Read by...your name."

  • Please leave no more than 1 second of silence at the beginning of your recording. Add about 5 seconds of silence at the end of your recording.


2. EDIT and SAVE your file:
  • Need noise-cleaning? See this LibriVox wiki page for a complete guide.
  • Save or export your recording to an mp3 file at 128kbs using the following format for the file name:

    snf060_titleofwork_authorlastname_yourinitials_128kb.mp3
  • Please keep the file name short. It isn't necessary to put the whole title in the file name - just a word or two. Please omit "a," "the," etc. from the title. Do not put spaces between words. Keep everything lower case. Even your initials should be lower case. The only underscores should be the separations between the snf volume, title, author's name, and your initials. There are only 4 underscores in a title!


3. UPLOAD your recording:
  • Please upload your finished recording using the LibriVox uploader: http://librivox.org/login/uploader. When your upload is complete, you will receive a link - please copy and post to the current nonfiction thread. If you don't post the fact that you've uploaded your recording, the nonfiction book coordinator won't know that you did it!
    Image
  • If you have trouble reading the image above, please send a private message to any admin.
  • To upload, you'll need to select the MC, which for the Short Nonfiction Collection is: knotyouraveragejo
  • If this doesn't work, or you have questions, please check our How To Send Your Recording wiki page


4. POST the following information in this thread:

  • Title of the work.
  • Author of the work.
  • The link to your file you copied from the uploader.
  • A URL link to the source from which you read (etext URL). NOTE: If posting from Gutenberg, please provide the link to the download page, e.g. http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/# (where # is the Gutenberg project number for the book).
  • Length in minutes.
  • If this is your first Librivox recording, we will also need your name as you would like it to appear in the LibriVox catalog, and, if you have a web page and want it linked to your name in the catalog, the URL of the web page.


5. PROOF LISTENING AND DEADLINE FOR EDITS on recordings you have submitted:


  • We ask that you complete any editing requested by the Dedicated Proof Listener within two weeks of the request, or, if you need more time, that you post in this thread to request an extension. There’s no shame in this; we’re all volunteers and things happen. Extensions are, however, at the discretion of the Book Coordinator. To be fair to the other readers, sections which cannot be edited in a timely manner will be deleted from the current volume of the Nonfiction Collection, but they can always be included in a future volume when the edits are complete.

Magic Window:



BC Admin [/quote]
Last edited by Sue Anderson on October 25th, 2018, 3:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » September 15th, 2018, 2:21 pm

Welcome to the 60th volume of the Short Nonfiction Collection. This is a place to share a special interest by recording a short work of public domain nonfiction. If you haven't something already in mind that you'd like to record, there are many bookshelves at Gutenberg.org filled with public domain nonfiction to explore http://www.gutenberg.org/wiki/Category:Bookshelf. The bookshelves for Countries, Education, Fine Arts, History, Music, Periodicals, and Technology are some places to start.

Hathi Trust and Archive.org are good resources:

https://archive.org/
https://www.hathitrust.org/

The Online Books Page has over 2 million PD listings! It was suggested by Soupy (Craig), our Dedicated Proof Listener.
http://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/lists.html

The Biodiversity Heritage Library is a great source for natural history. It was suggested by LibriVoxer MillionMoments. http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/

One caveat: if you are considering material from Wikisource, please check with me first, because some of the material on Wikisource does not meet LibriVox criteria for public domain. If you have any doubts about the public domain status of anything you want to read for the collection, please feel free to post the source along with your query in the thread, and I will be glad to help you! Thanks!

Sue (Book Coordinator, Short Nonfiction Collection)

soupy
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Post by soupy » September 17th, 2018, 8:57 am

"He that maketh haste to be rich shall not be innocent." --PROVERBS 28:20.
Open Project

My Website
Kierkegaards Challenge

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » September 17th, 2018, 10:51 am

soupy wrote:
September 17th, 2018, 8:57 am
I guess I'll start off with a little psychology

Rational Psychology by Christian von Wolff 1679-1754

Craig
Hi Craig, Thanks for starting off vol. 60 with this selection by Christian von Wolff, who, according to Wikipedia, was "the most eminent German philosopher between Leibniz and Kant," and whose name we did not yet have in the LibriVox catalog! :)

Academic life in Wolff's time sounds a bit rough. According to Wikipedia, Wolff's enemies at the University of Halle, where he taught, convinced king Frederick William I that if "Wolff's determinism were recognized, no soldier who deserted could be punished, since he would only have acted as it was predetermined that he should." The king then "deprived Wolff of his office, and commanded him to leave Prussian territory within 48 hours or be hanged." Wolff took the threat seriously, and left the same day!

soupy
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Post by soupy » September 17th, 2018, 2:45 pm

It wasn't easy for academics in the 16 and 17 hundreds and probably before that time. Many were afraid of losing their jobs and maybe their life. Not much by Wolff in English.

Thanks for PLing Sue

Craig
"He that maketh haste to be rich shall not be innocent." --PROVERBS 28:20.
Open Project

My Website
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soupy
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Post by soupy » September 19th, 2018, 8:06 am

"He that maketh haste to be rich shall not be innocent." --PROVERBS 28:20.
Open Project

My Website
Kierkegaards Challenge

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » September 20th, 2018, 6:25 pm

soupy wrote:
September 19th, 2018, 8:06 am
I'll add another piece of psychology

The Contrite Consciousness
by Georg Hegel
Josiah Royce 1855-1916 translator

Craig
Hi Craig,

Thank you for your contribution to Vol. 60! :) Hegel is one of the hardest reads in Philosophy.

I am only going to point out those places where I thought Hegel's implied meaning might be impacted by the reading. You can make what changes you want.

There are two words I would ask you please to check for pronunciation. They are "stoicism" and "sepulchre" Stoicism is used twice, at 1:26 and 15:24. Sepulchre occurs 3 times in a paragraph on page 621 ( around 20:16). Here are the words as pronounced by Google translate:
https://translate.google.com/#en/fr/sepulchre
https://translate.google.com/#en/fr/stoicism

----------
page 620, 2nd paragraph, 17:19
Text: "the mere formless tinkling of an altar bell"
You: "formless thinking"
----------
page 621, middle of lst paragraph, 20:03, sentence beginning "To seek him in so far..."
Text: "as something that sense could touch unhindered"
You: "as something that sense could not touch unhindered"
---------
page 621, same paragraph as above, 20:11
Text: But as such an object the Ideal exists only as a lost object."
You: "loose object"
---------
page 621, last paragraph, 3rd sentence 21:25
Text: For although in feeling it is sundered from its Ideal
You: "surrounded from its Ideal"
---------
page 622, 2nd paragraph, 23:22
Text: "no longer an essentially vain world
You: "valid world"
---------
page 623, 2nd paragraph, 3rd sentence, 26:08
Text: "both however are also referred to the Changeless as their source, and have their being hidden therein."
You: "and have their hidden meaning therein"
---------
page 624, 28:20
Text: "For Consciousness only seems to resign selfish satisfaction."
You: " to satisfy selfish satisfaction."
----------
page 624, about 2/3 down the page, the sentence which begins "The entire process..." 29:35
Text: "an act that was to attain the opposite result."
You: "that has to attain the opposite result."
---------
page 626, first full paragraph 34:28
Text: This relation of dependence"
You "This relation of self dependence."

---------------------------------------

Regards,

soupy
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Post by soupy » September 20th, 2018, 6:38 pm

Thanks Sue

That's a lot of errors :shock:

Thanks for the good PL :D

I'll get to them tomorrow.

Craig
"He that maketh haste to be rich shall not be innocent." --PROVERBS 28:20.
Open Project

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soupy
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Post by soupy » September 21st, 2018, 5:10 am

"He that maketh haste to be rich shall not be innocent." --PROVERBS 28:20.
Open Project

My Website
Kierkegaards Challenge

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » September 21st, 2018, 6:20 am

Hi Craig, Sounds good now! :) PL OK.

Leni
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Post by Leni » September 26th, 2018, 5:15 am

Hello, Sue! It's been a while, I am very happy to see you again.

Here is my contribution to the collection. Any feedback, including pronunciation mistakes, is welcome.

• Title of the work: Brazilian Ants and Monkeys
• Author of the work: Henry W. Bates
• The link to your file you copied from the uploader.: https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf060_brazilianants_bates_lrl_128kb.mp3
• A URL link to the source from which you read (etext URL): http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/33472
• Length in minutes: 23:44
Leni
=================

Anyone care for a loaf of bread? :mrgreen:

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » September 26th, 2018, 8:32 am

Leni wrote:
September 26th, 2018, 5:15 am
Hello, Sue! It's been a while, I am very happy to see you again.

Here is my contribution to the collection. Any feedback, including pronunciation mistakes, is welcome.

• Title of the work: Brazilian Ants and Monkeys
• Author of the work: Henry W. Bates
Hi Leni, A most warm welcome back to LibriVox! :D Glad to see you!

For anybody reading this, Leni and I go way way back into the early days of LibriVox. We traded proof listening for each other's solos for a long time. Leni PL'd my very first LibriVox solo, Stickeen by John Muir, which was cataloged on September 30, 2008! That's a long time ago! And I think the first of Leni's Portuguese-language solos that I PL'd was the Sermões of Padre Antonio Vieira (1608-1697), which was cataloged on April 4, 2009. (PLing is a great way to revive those foreign languages you studied in high school or college, which was my case with the Portuguese.)

Leni, I've put your selection into the Magic Window. The Short Nonfiction Collection has another long-time LibriVoxer as our dedicated proof listener: Craig (Soupy), who will PL your selection for you.

My best,

msfry
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Post by msfry » September 26th, 2018, 10:20 am

Here is a classic little parable, The Broken Window, by Frederick Bastiat, taken from his Essays on Political Economy

https://www.gutenberg.org/files/15962/15962-h/15962-h.htm
https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf060_brokenwindow_bastiat_mtf_128kb.mp3 6:28
Michele Fry, CC
My Projects
"Knowing that a tomato is actually a fruit is Knowledge. Wisdom is not putting one in a fruit salad."
.

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » September 26th, 2018, 1:07 pm

msfry wrote:
September 26th, 2018, 10:20 am
Here is a classic little parable, The Broken Window, by Frederick Bastiat, taken from his Essays on Political Economy
Hi Michele, Thanks for contributing this pithy parable on economics! :)

"Bastiat (1801-1850) was the author of many works on economics and political economy, generally characterized by their clear organization, forceful argumentation and acerbic wit." (Wikipedia)

soupy
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Post by soupy » September 26th, 2018, 1:33 pm

Thanks Leni. You were MC for my first solo - Soren Kierkegaard Various Readings in 2010.

I found only one error in pronounciation.

8:34 where it is as broad as the Thames at London Bridge – The river in London is pronounced Tames - with a long a.

Craig
Last edited by soupy on September 26th, 2018, 8:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"He that maketh haste to be rich shall not be innocent." --PROVERBS 28:20.
Open Project

My Website
Kierkegaards Challenge

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