[WANTED] Irish pronunciation help, please

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chocoholic
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Post by chocoholic » June 15th, 2012, 7:20 am

Kithogue
Poulaphouca

I am pretty sure about my guesses but... they are guesses. :) These are from Ulysses. Thanks!

edited to add: Guesses confirmed as correct, so all is well.
Laurie Anne

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Post by WFVoiceovers » July 10th, 2012, 8:45 pm

Forgive me! I only saw this post now. Maybe you already have read them into your recording?

Kithogue - is difficult to write and better to sound Kth-OH-G the 'th' is like monTH and the G is the same as in Gary
Poulaphouca - this is easier POO-LA-FOO-KAH Poo and Foo as in FOOD

WF

chocoholic
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Post by chocoholic » July 10th, 2012, 9:20 pm

Thank you! Yes, I've already sent in the recording, but I checked with one of our Irish volunteers by PM before I did. Always good to have confirmation, and now anyone else reading will know too.

I thought Kithogue was one of Joyce's hallucinatory made-up words until I looked it up. :)
Laurie Anne

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Post by RuthieG » October 31st, 2013, 5:21 am

Help please! George Borrow had no difficulty learning Irish, but I do not have his gifts.
A labhair Padruic n’insefail nan riogh
Thank you :)

Ruth
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wildlindajohnson
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Post by wildlindajohnson » September 23rd, 2018, 7:55 am

Hello friends, I hope someone can help me to correctly pronounce this phrase (and thank you in advance):

"Sethe wille wyrcan wastbaere lond ateo hin of tham acre aefest sona fearn and thornas and figrsas swasame weods"
Linda Johnson

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Post by neddieseagoon » September 28th, 2018, 11:26 am

wildlindajohnson wrote:
September 23rd, 2018, 7:55 am
"Sethe wille wyrcan wastbaere lond ateo hin of tham acre aefest sona fearn and thornas and figrsas swasame weods"
What you have here is not Irish but Old English (i.e., Anglo-Saxon). It was written by King Alfred the Great (849-899).
I'm not an expert, but I've studied a little OE and I'd probably pronounce the sentence as follows. Note that all words of more than one syllable are stressed on the first syllable.

Sethe - se as in "set"; th as in "that"; e as in "set"
wille - will as "will"; e as in "set"
wyrcan - w as in "wet"; y as French "u" or German "ü", r flipped, can as "Kahn"
wastbaere - wa as in "wash"; stb as in "fast break"; ae like the "a" in "cat"; r flipped, e as in "set"
lond - as the "laund" of "launder"
ateo - a as "ah"; t as "t"; eo as a diphthong of the "e" of "set" and "o"
hin - as the "hin" of "hinder"
of - as if spelled "off"
tham - th as in "think"; a as if spelled "ah"; m as in "ham"
acre - a as "ah"; cr as in "across"; e as in "set"
aefest - ae like the "a" in "cat"; fest as if spelled "vest"
sona - so as "so"; na as if spelled "nah"
fearn - f as in "fast"; ea as a diphthong of the "e" of "set" and the "a" of "father"; r flipped; n as in "horn"
and - a as in "father"; nd as in "and"
thornas - thorn as "thorn", with flipped r; as as in British "class"
and - a as in "father"; nd as in "and"
figrsas* - fig as in "fig"; r flipped, sas as "zahs"
swasame - swa as in "swallow"; sa with the "a" of "father"; me as in "met"
weods - like "wades", but with the diphthong of "e" and "o" described above for "ateo"

*figrsas - I'm not at all sure what to do with that consonant cluster in the middle. I'm guessing that the proximity of voiced g and r would voice the s, but I couldn't swear to it.

I hope this is helpful.

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Post by wildlindajohnson » September 28th, 2018, 3:52 pm

What a huge help; thank you so much for all this effort. Hope I can make you proud!
Linda Johnson

msfry
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Post by msfry » December 21st, 2020, 7:54 am

This thread seems inactive, but I'll post my call for help here, as well as in the general Pronunciation help forum:
What is keeping me from finishing The Crock of Gold, are these 3 paragraphs in the last chapter, a roundup of dozens of Irish gods whose names I cannot pronounce. If any authentic Irish speaker can help, I'd be so grateful.

"Of those who came were Aine Ni Rogail of Cnoc Aine and Ivil of Craglea, the queens of North and South Munster, and Una the queen of Ormond; these, with their hosts, sang upon the summit of the hill welcoming the god. There came the five guardians of Ulster, the fomentors of combat:—Brier Mac Belgan of Dromona Breg, Redg Rotbill from the slopes of Magh-Itar, Tinnel the son of Boclacthna of Slieve Edlicon, Grici of Cruachan-Aigle, a goodly name, and Gulban Glas Mac Grici, whose dun is in the Ben of Gulban. These five, matchless in combat, marched up the hill with their tribes, shouting as they went. From north and south they came, and from east and west, bright and happy beings, a multitude, without fear, without distraction, so that soon the hill was gay with their voices and their noble raiment.

Among them came the people of the Lupra, the ancient Leprecauns of the world, leaping like goats among the knees of the heroes. They were headed by their king Udan Mac Audain and Beg Mac Beg his tanist, and, following behind, was Glomhar O’Glomrach of the sea, the strongest man of their people, dressed in the skin of a weasel; and there were also the chief men of that clan, well known of old, Conan Mac Rihid, Gaerku Mac Gairid, Mether Mac Mintan and Esirt Mac Beg, the son of Bueyen, born in a victory. This king was that same Udan the chief of the Lupra who had been placed under bonds to taste the porridge in the great cauldron of Emania, into which pot he fell, and was taken captive with his wife, and held for five weary years, until he surrendered that which he most valued in the world, even his boots: the people of the hills laugh still at the story, and the Leprecauns may still be mortified by it.

There came Bove Derg, the Fiery, seldom seen, and his harper the son of Trogain, whose music heals the sick and makes the sad heart merry; Rochy Mac Elathan, Dagda Mor, the Father of Stars, and his daughter from the Cave of Cruachan; Credh Mac Aedh of Raghery and Cas Corach son of the great Ollav; Mananaan Mac Lir came from his wide waters shouting louder than the wind, with his daughters Cliona and Aoife and Etain Fair-Hair; and Coll and Cecht and Mac Greina, the Plough, the Hazel, and the Sun came with their wives, whose names are not forgotten, even Banba and Fodla and Eire, names of glory. Lugh of the Long-Hand, filled with mysterious wisdom, was not absent, whose father was sadly avenged on the sons of Turann—these with their hosts."

Aine Ni Rogail of Cnoc Aine
Ivil of Craglea
Brier Mac Belgan of Dromona Breg
Redg Rotbill from the slopes of Magh-Itar
Tinnel the son of Boclacthna of Slieve Edlicon
Grici of Cruachan-Aigle
Gulban Glas Mac Grici
Udan Mac Audain
Glomhar O’Glomrach
Conan Mac Rihid
Gaerku Mac Gairid
Mether Mac Mintan
Esirt Mac Beg, the son of Bueyen
cauldron of Emania
Bove Derg, the Fiery
Trogain
Rochy Mac Elathan
Dagda Mor, the Father of Stars
Cave of Cruachan
Credh Mac Aedh of Raghery
Cas Corach son of the great Ollav
Mananaan Mac Lir
Cliona and Aoife and Etain Fair-Hair
Coll and Cecht and Mac Greina
Banba and Fodla and Eire
Lugh of the Long-Hand
sons of Turann
Michele Fry, CC
"There is no frigate like a book to take us lands away, Nor any coursers like a page of prancing poetry." ~ Emily Dickinson

Love Stories #4
Coffee Break Collection #30 - Mythical Creatures

msfry
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Post by msfry » December 21st, 2020, 7:55 am

This thread seems inactive, but I'll post my call for help here, as well as in the general Pronunciation help forum:
What is keeping me from finishing The Crock of Gold, are these 3 paragraphs in the last chapter, a roundup of dozens of Irish gods whose names I cannot pronounce. If any authentic Irish speaker can help, I'd be so grateful.

"Of those who came were Aine Ni Rogail of Cnoc Aine and Ivil of Craglea, the queens of North and South Munster, and Una the queen of Ormond; these, with their hosts, sang upon the summit of the hill welcoming the god. There came the five guardians of Ulster, the fomentors of combat:—Brier Mac Belgan of Dromona Breg, Redg Rotbill from the slopes of Magh-Itar, Tinnel the son of Boclacthna of Slieve Edlicon, Grici of Cruachan-Aigle, a goodly name, and Gulban Glas Mac Grici, whose dun is in the Ben of Gulban. These five, matchless in combat, marched up the hill with their tribes, shouting as they went. From north and south they came, and from east and west, bright and happy beings, a multitude, without fear, without distraction, so that soon the hill was gay with their voices and their noble raiment.

Among them came the people of the Lupra, the ancient Leprecauns of the world, leaping like goats among the knees of the heroes. They were headed by their king Udan Mac Audain and Beg Mac Beg his tanist, and, following behind, was Glomhar O’Glomrach of the sea, the strongest man of their people, dressed in the skin of a weasel; and there were also the chief men of that clan, well known of old, Conan Mac Rihid, Gaerku Mac Gairid, Mether Mac Mintan and Esirt Mac Beg, the son of Bueyen, born in a victory. This king was that same Udan the chief of the Lupra who had been placed under bonds to taste the porridge in the great cauldron of Emania, into which pot he fell, and was taken captive with his wife, and held for five weary years, until he surrendered that which he most valued in the world, even his boots: the people of the hills laugh still at the story, and the Leprecauns may still be mortified by it.

There came Bove Derg, the Fiery, seldom seen, and his harper the son of Trogain, whose music heals the sick and makes the sad heart merry; Rochy Mac Elathan, Dagda Mor, the Father of Stars, and his daughter from the Cave of Cruachan; Credh Mac Aedh of Raghery and Cas Corach son of the great Ollav; Mananaan Mac Lir came from his wide waters shouting louder than the wind, with his daughters Cliona and Aoife and Etain Fair-Hair; and Coll and Cecht and Mac Greina, the Plough, the Hazel, and the Sun came with their wives, whose names are not forgotten, even Banba and Fodla and Eire, names of glory. Lugh of the Long-Hand, filled with mysterious wisdom, was not absent, whose father was sadly avenged on the sons of Turann—these with their hosts."

Aine Ni Rogail of Cnoc Aine
Ivil of Craglea
Brier Mac Belgan of Dromona Breg
Redg Rotbill from the slopes of Magh-Itar
Tinnel the son of Boclacthna of Slieve Edlicon
Grici of Cruachan-Aigle
Gulban Glas Mac Grici
Udan Mac Audain
Glomhar O’Glomrach
Conan Mac Rihid
Gaerku Mac Gairid
Mether Mac Mintan
Esirt Mac Beg, the son of Bueyen
cauldron of Emania
Bove Derg, the Fiery
Trogain
Rochy Mac Elathan
Dagda Mor, the Father of Stars
Cave of Cruachan
Credh Mac Aedh of Raghery
Cas Corach son of the great Ollav
Mananaan Mac Lir
Cliona and Aoife and Etain Fair-Hair
Coll and Cecht and Mac Greina
Banba and Fodla and Eire
Lugh of the Long-Hand
sons of Turann
Michele Fry, CC
"There is no frigate like a book to take us lands away, Nor any coursers like a page of prancing poetry." ~ Emily Dickinson

Love Stories #4
Coffee Break Collection #30 - Mythical Creatures

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