[GROUP] Selections from the Speeches and Writings of Edmund Burke-ag

Upcoming books fully-subscribed with readers. Check progress here, too
Post Reply
InTheDesert
Posts: 7202
Joined: August 20th, 2019, 8:25 pm

Post by InTheDesert »

Selections from the Speeches and Writings of Edmund Burke, by Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797)
There can be no hesitation in according to him a station among the most extraordinary men that ever appeared; and we think there is now but little diversity of opinion as to the kind of place which it is fit to assign him. He was a writer of the first class, and excelled in almost every kind of composition. Possessed of most extensive knowledge, and of the most various description; acquainted alike with what different classes of men knew, each in his own province, and with much that hardly any one ever thought of learning; he could either bring his masses of information to bear directly upon the subjects to which they severally belonged,—or he could avail himself of them generally to strengthen his faculties, and enlarge his views,—or he could turn any of them to account for the purpose of illustrating his theme, or enriching his diction. Hence, when he is handling any one matter, we perceive that we are conversing with a reasoner or a teacher, to whom almost every other branch of knowledge is familiar: his views range over all the cognate objects; his reasonings are derived from principles applicable to other themes, as well as the one in hand; arguments pour in from all sides, as well as those which start up under our feet,—the natural growth of the path he is leading us over; while to throw light round our steps, and either explore its darkest places, or serve for our recreation; illustrations are fetched from a thousand quarters, and an imagination marvellously quick to descry unthought of resemblances, points to our use the stores, which a love yet more marvellously has gathered from all ages and nations, and arts and tongues. (Summary by Sir James Mackintosh)
Source text (please read only from this text!): https://archive.org/details/selectionsfromsp00burkuoft

Deadline: Please submit your recording within 2 months of placing your claim. If you cannot complete the recording within this time, please post in the thread to relinquish your claim or to ask the BC for an extension. If your recording is not completed by the deadline, your claim may be reassigned at the BC's discretion.

Claiming sections: Look in the Magic Window below for the list of available sections. Post a reply in this thread asking for the section you would like to record.

New to recording? Please see our Newbie Guide to Recording for further instructions. A quick guide to our required technical settings can be found here. When you post your file, please tell the BC what name you would like to use in our catalog.

Prooflistening level: Standard
Prospective PLs, please see the Guide for Proof-listeners.

Please don't download or listen to files belonging to projects in process unless you are the BC or PL. Our servers are not set up to handle the greater volume of traffic. Please wait until the project has been completed. Thanks!

Magic Window:



BC Admin
========================================


Genres for the project: *Non-fiction/Political Science; *Non-fiction/Literary Collections/Short non-fiction

Keywords that describe the book: politics, philosophy, church, quotations

========================================

LibriVox recording settings: mono (1 channel), 44100 Hz sample rate, 128 kbps constant bit rate MP3. See the Tech Specs

Intro to recording:
Leave 0.5 to 1 second of silence at the beginning.

Say:
"Section # of Selections from the Speeches and Writings of Edmund Burke. This is a LibriVox recording. All LibriVox recordings are in the public domain. For more information or to volunteer, please visit librivox.org." [Optional: "Read by your name."] "Selections from the Speeches and Writings of Edmund Burke"

Special Notes:
  1. Please don't read the section titles in the Magic Window. Just read the headings when you reach them in the text.
End of recording:
Say:
"End of section #." [Optional, and if not stated in the intro: "Read by your name, city, date."]
If you are recording the final section of the book, add:
"End of Selections from the Speeches and Writings of Edmund Burke"
Leave 5 seconds of silence at the end.

Filename: selections_##_burke_128kb.mp3 where ## is the section number. (e.g. selections_01_burke_128kb.mp3)

Upload to the LibriVox Uploader: https://librivox.org/login/uploader
Image
(If you have trouble reading the image above, please contact an admin)

MC to select: alg1001

Copy and paste the file link generated by the uploader into a new post in this thread along with the file duration (mm:ss). Watch this thread for prooflistening notes.

If you have any questions, don't hesitate to ask! Just post in this thread.
Last edited by InTheDesert on November 3rd, 2023, 6:23 am, edited 2 times in total.
Show these slow-moving projects some love!
The Autobiography of Charles H. Spurgeon 1834-1854
DPL DPL 27 43
InTheDesert
Posts: 7202
Joined: August 20th, 2019, 8:25 pm

Post by InTheDesert »

I will DPL and take the first two sections.

A question for my friendly MC: I have dropped "by Edmund Burke" in the disclaimer because it's not very elegant. Any objections?

Sections:
  1. Introductory Essay
  2. Appendix
  3. Nature and Functions of the House of Commons — Retrospect and Resignation — Modesty of Mind — Newton and Nature — Theory and Practice (758 words)
  4. Induction and Comparison — Divine Power on the Human Idea — Union of Love and Dread in Religion — Office of Sympathy — Words (379 words)
  5. Nature Anticipates Man — Self — Inspection — Power of the Obscure — Female Beauty — Novelty and Curiosity (379 words)
  6. Pleasures of Analogy — Ambition — Extensions of Sympathy — Philosophy of Taste — Clearness and Strength in Style (379 words)
  7. Unity of Imagination — Effect of Words — Investigation — Sublime — Obscurity (379 words)
  8. Principles of Taste — the Beautiful — the Real and the Ideal — Judgment in Art — Moral Effects of Language (758 words)
  9. Security of Truth — Imitation an Instinctive Law — Standard of Reason and Taste — Use of Theory — Political Outcasts (379 words)
  10. Injustice to Our Own Age — False Coalitions — Political Empiricism — a Visionary — Party Divisions (379 words)
  11. Decorum in Party — not So Bad as We Seem — Politics Without Principle — Moral Debasement Progressive — Despotism (379 words)
  12. Judgment and Policy — Popular Discontent — the People and Their Rulers — Government Favouritism — Administration and Legislation (758 words)
  13. Influence of the Crown — Voice of the People — Fallacy of Extremes — Private Character a Basis for Public Confidence — Prevention (758 words)
  14. Confidence in the People — False Maxims Assumed as First Principles — Lord Chatham — Grenville — Charles Townshend (1895 words)
  15. Party and Place — Political Connections — Neutrality — Weakness in Government — American Progress (1137 words)
  16. Combination, not Faction — Great Men — Power of Constituents — Influence of Place in Government — Taxation Involves Principle (758 words)
  17. Good Member of Parliament — Fisheries of New England — Preparation for Parliament — Bathurst and America's Future — Candid Policy (1137 words)
  18. Wisdom of Concession — Magnanimity — Duty of Representatives — Prudential Silence — Colonial Ties (379 words)
  19. Government and Legislation — Parliament — Moral Levellers — Public Salary and Patriotic Service — Rational Liberty (758 words)
  20. Ireland and Magna Charta — Colonies and British Constitution — Reciprocal Confidence — Pensions and the Crown — Colonial Progress (1137 words)
  21. Feudal Principles and Modern Times — Restrictive Virtues — Libellers of Human Nature — Refusal a Revenue — a Party Man (1137 words)
  22. Patriotism and Public Income — American Protestantism — Right of Taxation — Contracted Views — Assimilating Power of Contact (1137 words)
  23. Prudence of Timely Reform — Difficulties of Reformers — Philosophy of Commerce — Theorizing Politicians — Economy and Public Spirit (758 words)
  24. Reform Ought to Be Progressive — Civil Freedom — Tendencies of Power — Individual Good and Public Benefit — Public Corruption (758 words)
  25. Cruelty and Cowardice — Bad Laws Produce Base Subserviency — False Regret — British Dominion in East India — Political Charity (1516 words)
  26. Evils of Distraction — Charles Fox — the Impracticable Undesirable — Constitution of the Commons — Emoluments of Office (1137 words)
  27. Moral Distinctions — Electors and Representatives — Popular Opinion a Fallacious Standard — English Reformation — Proscription (1137 words)
  28. Just Freedom — England's Embassy to America — Howard, the Philanthropist — Parliamentary Retrospect — People and Parliament (1137 words)
  29. Reformed Civil List — French and English Revolution — Armed Discipline — Gilded Despotism — Our French Dangers (1137 words)
  30. Sir George Saville — Corruption not Self — Reformed — the Bribed and the Bribers — Hyder Ali — Reformation and Anarchy Contrasted and Compared (1895 words)
  31. Confidence and Jealousy — Economy of Injustice — Subsistence and Revenue — Authority and Venality — Prerogative of the Crown and Privilege of Parliament (758 words)
  32. Burke and Fox — Peers and Commons — Natural Self — Destruction — the Carnatic — Abstract Theory of Human Liberty (1895 words)
  33. Politics and the Pulpit — Idea of French Revolution — Patriotic Distinction — Kingly Power not Based on Popular Choice — Preaching Democracy of Dissent (1516 words)
  34. Jargon of Republicanism — Conservative Progress of Inherited Freedom — Conservation and Correction — Hereditary Succession of English Crown — Limits of Legislative Capacity (1895 words)
  35. Our Constitution, not Fabricated, But Inherited — Low Aims and Low Instruments — House of Commons Contrasted with National Assembly — Property, More Than Ability, Represented in Parliament — Virtue and Wisdom Qualify for Government (2653 words)
  36. Natural and Civil Rights — Marie Antoinette — Spirit of a Gentleman and the Spirit of Religion — Power Survives Opinion — Chivalry a Moralizing Charm (3032 words)
  37. Sacredness of Moral Instincts — Parental Experience — Revolutionary Scene — Economy on State Principles — Philosophical Vanity; Its Maxims, and Effects (4927 words)
  38. Unity Between Church and State — Triple Basis of French Revolution — Correspondent System of Manners and Morals — Ferocity of Jacobinism — Voice of Oppression (3032 words)
  39. Britain Vindicated in Her War with France — Polish and French Revolution — Europe in 1789 — Atheism Cannot Repent — Outward Dignity of the Church Defended (2653 words)
  40. Danger of Abstract Views — Appeal to Impartiality — Historical Estimate of Louis Xvi — Negative Religion a Nullity — Antechamber of Regicide (1895 words)
  41. Tremendousness of War — English Officers — Diplomacy of Humiliation — Relation of Wealth to National Dignity — Ambassadors of Infamy (1516 words)
  42. Difficulty the Path to Glory — Robespierre and His Counterparts — Accumulation, a State Principle — Warning for a Nation — Santerre and Tallien (2274 words)
  43. Sir Sydney Smith — a Moral Distinction — Infidels and Their Policy — What a Minister Should Attempt — Law of Vicinity (2653 words)
  44. European Community — Perils of Jacobin Peace — Parliamentary and Regal Prerogative — Burke's Design in His Greatest Work — Lord Keppel (3411 words)
  45. "Labouring Poor" — State Consecrated by the Church — Fate of Louis XVIII — Nobility — Legislation and Republicans (2653 words)
  46. Principle of State-Consecration — British Stability — Literary Atheists — City of Paris — Principle of Church Property (3411 words)
  47. Parsimony not Economy — Majesty of the British Constitution — Duty not Based on Will — Ecclesiastical Confiscation — Moral of History (2274 words)
  48. Use of Defects in History — Social Contract — Prescriptive Rights — Madness of Innovation — the State, Its Own Revenue (1895 words)
  49. Metaphysical Depravity — Personal and Ancestral Claims — Monastic and Philosophic Superstition — Difficulty and Wisdom of Corporate Reform — Distinctive Character of English Protestantism (2274 words)
  50. Fictitious Liberty — French Ignorance of English Character — the "People," and "Omnipotence" of Parliament — Magnanimity of English People — True Basis of Civil Society (1895 words)
  51. Rousseau — Moral Heroes — Kingdom of France — Grievance and Opinion — Perplexity and Policy (1516 words)
  52. Historical Instruction — Montesquieu — Articles, and Scripture — Problem of Legislation — Order, Labour, and Property (1516 words)
  53. Regicidal Legislature — Government not to Be Rashly Censured — Etiquette — Ancient Establishments — Sentiment and Policy (758 words)
  54. Patriotism — Necessity, a Relative Term — King John and the Pope — Consumption and Produce — "Priests of the Rights of Man" (1516 words)
  55. "His Grace" — Speculation and History — Labour and Wages — a Complete Revolution — British Government in India (3790 words)
  56. Money and Science — Political Axioms — Disappointed Ambition — Difficulty an Instructor — Sovereign Jurisdictions (2274 words)
  57. Prudery of False Reform — Exaggeration — Tactics of Cabal — Government, Relative, not Absolute — General Views (2274 words)
  58. Magnitude in Building — Society and Solitude — East — India Bill and Company — Parliaments and Elections — Religion and Magistracy (3790 words)
  59. Persecution, False in Theory — Irish Legislation — Henry of Navarre — Test Acts — What Faction Ought to Teach (1137 words)
  60. Grievances by Law — Revolutionary Politics — Toleration Become Intolerant — Wilkes and Right of Election — Rockingham and Conway (4169 words)
  61. Politics in the Pulpit — William the Conqueror — King Alfred — Druids — Saxon Conquest and Conversion (4169 words)
  62. Ministerial Responsibility — Monastic Institutions and Their Results — Common Law and Magna Charta — Europe and the Norman Invasion — Ancient Inhabitants of Britain (7959 words)
  63. Public Prosecutions — True Nature of a Jacobin War — National Dignity — Principles of Government not Absolute, But Relative — Declaration of 1793 (3411 words)
  64. Moral Diet — King William's Policy — Distemper of Remedy — War and Will of the People — False Policy in Our French War (3032 words)
  65. Moral Essence Makes a Nation — Public Spirit — Progressive Growth of Christian States — Petty Interests — Pius Vii (1895 words)
  66. Extinction of Local Patriotism — Walpole and His Policy — Political Peace — Public Loans — Historical Strictures (4169 words)
  67. Constitution not the People's Slave — Modern "Lights" — Republics in the Abstract — an English Monarch — Physiognomy (1516 words)
  68. The Eye — Abolition and Use of Parliaments — Cromwell and His Contrasts — Delicacy — Confiscation and Currency (3032 words)
  69. "Omnipotence of Church Plunder" — Ugliness — Grace — Elegance and Speciousness — the Beautiful in Feeling (1137 words)
  70. The Beautiful in Sounds — British Church (1137 words)
Show these slow-moving projects some love!
The Autobiography of Charles H. Spurgeon 1834-1854
DPL DPL 27 43
alg1001
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 12812
Joined: January 23rd, 2010, 4:21 pm
Location: faraway

Post by alg1001 »

Hi,
I'll MC this for you. Your strategy for the opening script sounds fine.
Have a nice night!
-Amy
In the mind, or consciousness of the Earth this flower first lay latent as a dream. Perhaps, in her consciousness, it nested as that which in us corresponds to a little thought.--A.Blackwood
InTheDesert
Posts: 7202
Joined: August 20th, 2019, 8:25 pm

Post by InTheDesert »

alg1001 wrote: November 4th, 2023, 3:11 pm Hi,
I'll MC this for you. Your strategy for the opening script sounds fine.
Have a nice night!
-Amy
Thankyou, ready for readers!
Show these slow-moving projects some love!
The Autobiography of Charles H. Spurgeon 1834-1854
DPL DPL 27 43
alg1001
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 12812
Joined: January 23rd, 2010, 4:21 pm
Location: faraway

Post by alg1001 »

Great. Over to Readers Wanted Short Works. If you want it in Books instead, let me know. :)
In the mind, or consciousness of the Earth this flower first lay latent as a dream. Perhaps, in her consciousness, it nested as that which in us corresponds to a little thought.--A.Blackwood
InTheDesert
Posts: 7202
Joined: August 20th, 2019, 8:25 pm

Post by InTheDesert »

alg1001 wrote: November 5th, 2023, 4:19 am Great. Over to Readers Wanted Short Works. If you want it in Books instead, let me know. :)
Sounds good!
Show these slow-moving projects some love!
The Autobiography of Charles H. Spurgeon 1834-1854
DPL DPL 27 43
Steve
Posts: 666
Joined: April 29th, 2012, 8:54 am
Location: Norwich England

Post by Steve »

Could I please claim Section 20 - Ireland and Magna Charta... etc ?

Cheers

Steve
InTheDesert
Posts: 7202
Joined: August 20th, 2019, 8:25 pm

Post by InTheDesert »

Steve wrote: November 5th, 2023, 5:38 am Could I please claim Section 20 - Ireland and Magna Charta... etc ?

Cheers

Steve
All yours!
Show these slow-moving projects some love!
The Autobiography of Charles H. Spurgeon 1834-1854
DPL DPL 27 43
InTheDesert
Posts: 7202
Joined: August 20th, 2019, 8:25 pm

Post by InTheDesert »

Show these slow-moving projects some love!
The Autobiography of Charles H. Spurgeon 1834-1854
DPL DPL 27 43
Steve
Posts: 666
Joined: April 29th, 2012, 8:54 am
Location: Norwich England

Post by Steve »

Section 20 - Ireland and Magna Charta... etc uploaded:

https://librivox.org/uploads/alg1001/selections_20_burke_128kb.mp3

12:31

Steve
czandra
Posts: 3124
Joined: February 13th, 2021, 1:43 pm
Location: Quebec, Canada
Contact:

Post by czandra »

Section 2 is fine, but for one slip at the very end; about 4:29 text is possible cases, but I hear "possible causes."

Would that every good writer should hear such praise in his or her lifetime!

Czandra
I asked my librarian about the noise, and she said,
"no one would come here if they weren't allowed to talk out loud."
So I read out loud.
InTheDesert
Posts: 7202
Joined: August 20th, 2019, 8:25 pm

Post by InTheDesert »

czandra wrote: November 7th, 2023, 3:42 pm Section 2 is fine, but for one slip at the very end; about 4:29 text is possible cases, but I hear "possible causes."

Would that every good writer should hear such praise in his or her lifetime!

Czandra
Thankyou!
Show these slow-moving projects some love!
The Autobiography of Charles H. Spurgeon 1834-1854
DPL DPL 27 43
InTheDesert
Posts: 7202
Joined: August 20th, 2019, 8:25 pm

Post by InTheDesert »

Show these slow-moving projects some love!
The Autobiography of Charles H. Spurgeon 1834-1854
DPL DPL 27 43
Ariphron
Posts: 316
Joined: January 16th, 2019, 10:10 pm

Post by Ariphron »

I would like sections 6-8.
InTheDesert
Posts: 7202
Joined: August 20th, 2019, 8:25 pm

Post by InTheDesert »

Ariphron wrote: November 8th, 2023, 12:49 pm I would like sections 6-8.
Done!
Show these slow-moving projects some love!
The Autobiography of Charles H. Spurgeon 1834-1854
DPL DPL 27 43
Post Reply