COMPLETE: Short Nonfiction Collection Vol. 31 - jo

Solo or group recordings that are finished and fully available for listeners
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HughGil
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Post by HughGil » August 27th, 2013, 7:39 pm

Sue Anderson wrote:Hi Hugh, thanks for PLing; yes, I intended to stop . . .

You are welcome :D
"the story seems to take forever to go anywhere - and I know where it is going." - m8b1 2012

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » August 30th, 2013, 4:06 pm

Action, intimacy, and splendor blend in every (moving picture) reel,” wrote American poet Vachel Lindsay in his The Art of the Movies (1916). http://archive.org/details/artofmovingpictu00lind. What the movies lacked back then was sound—something LibriVox readers know how to remedy! Lindsay makes an intelligent early attempt at film criticism. His chapter “The Picture of Crowd Splendor,” in which he discusses W. C. Griffith’s films, would be a particularly interesting read: “While the motion picture is shallow in showing private passion, it is powerful in conveying the passions of masses of men.”

How to Write for the Movies (1915), by Louella Parsons http://archive.org/details/howtowriteformo00parsgoog gives the aspiring screen writer a sample synopsis to examine: “One night in a moment of madness, he takes Adelaide in his arms . . .” Fun!

Musical Accompaniment of Moving Pictures—a Practical Guide for Pianists and Organists (1920) by Edith Lang and George West will fascinate anybody interested in the relationship between music and emotion. http://archive.org/details/musicalaccompani00languoft. The chapter, “The Feature Film,” would make a great read. It dissects the music for a single silent film, “The Rose of the World,” scene by scene. “Captain S. is married to a 16-year old girl named Rose, who is very beautiful, but as yet has not awakened to a realization of life and love. (Main love theme, intensely emotional.) etc. etc. There’s also a list of piano repertoire to evoke robbers, villains, and vampires!

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » September 3rd, 2013, 2:20 pm

Smoke signals, pigeons (the travel memoir I’m presently reading for LibriVox features a bird named Honest Tom, which, in 1599, flew a regular mail route between Aleppo and Scanderoon, Turkey)-- the telegraph, telephone, the internet, smart phones . . . faster communication . . . but better? Now with talk of cell phone “addiction,” here are some readings that explore the impact of the cell phone’s predecessors on human behavior.

If only I’d known, I would have acted differently . . . and I blame the telegraph company for late message delivery.” This line of thinking had the lawyers busy during the 19th century. Not arriving in time to attend a wife’s funeral; inability to prevent an underage daughter from running off to get married led to claims against telegraph companies for “mental anguish.” Failing to land a low bid for a furniture contract was cause to sue the telegraph company for the amount of the lost commission. There are many such citations in the law journals: http://archive.org/stream/jstor-1064247/1064247#page/n0/mode/1up; http://archive.org/stream/jstor-783042/783042#page/n0/mode/1up; http://archive.org/details/jstor-1275850. A sampling of these would be instructive.

Gushing about the impact of the telephone in 1910, Herbert Casson has this to say: “What we might call the telphonization of city life . . . has remarkably altered our manner of living. . . It has enabled us to be more social and cooperative. It has become so truly an organ of the social body that by telephone we now enter into contracts, give evidence, try lawsuits, make speeches, propose marriage, confer degrees, appeal to voters, and do almost everything else that is a matter of speech.” Sound familiar? Two chapters in Casson’s The History of the Telephone, plumb the psychology of “telphonization”--“Notable Users of the Telephone,” and “The Telephone and National Efficiency.” http://archive.org/details/historytelephon00cassgoog. Fascinating and insightful!

Veggrower
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Post by Veggrower » September 4th, 2013, 12:26 am

Hi Sue,

Following on from the piece about weathercocks in SNF029, here are two readings concerning sundials, also by Warrington Hogg, who died in 1893. These three articles, which all appeared in the Strand Magazine, seem to be the only things he published. I think they're interesting, not just for the facts about sundials, but also for the snippets of history and touches of humour.

Sundials, part one: http://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf031_sundialspartone_hogg_gb_128kb.mp3

Source: http://archive.org/stream/TheStrandMagazineAnIllustratedMonthly/TheStrandMagazine1892aVol.IiiJan-jun#page/n606/mode/1up

The length is 13:32

Sundials, part two: http://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf031_sundialsparttwo_hogg_gb_128kb.mp3

Source: http://archive.org/stream/TheStrandMagazineAnIllustratedMonthly/TheStrandMagazine1893bVol.ViJul-dec#page/n317/mode/1up

Length is 23:32. Thanks,

Garth

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » September 4th, 2013, 3:37 am

Veggrower wrote:Hi Sue,

Following on from the piece about weathercocks in SNF029, here are two readings concerning sundials, also by Warrington Hogg, who died in 1893. These three articles, which all appeared in the Strand Magazine, seem to be the only things he published. I think they're interesting, not just for the facts about sundials, but also for the snippets of history and touches of humour.


Thanks,

Garth
Hi there Garth, Thanks so much for your contributions to this volume! :) I'm looking forward to listening later today; I enjoyed Hogg's last piece about weathervanes very much. There must be a bit of telepathy at work too, because yesterday, in the travel memoir I'm reading from 1600, they went to gather samphire on the rocks near Scanderoon, supposedly at the very spot where Jonah was swallowed by the whale (!), and I immediately thought of your reading in volume 28, The Samphire Gatherer, by W. H. Hudson. http://librivox.org/short-nonfiction-collection-vol-028-by-various/. That was the first time I had ever heard of samphire! So, I thank you for all your interesting readings.
Last edited by Sue Anderson on September 4th, 2013, 4:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » September 4th, 2013, 4:31 pm

Veggrower wrote:Hi Sue,

Following on from the piece about weathercocks in SNF029, here are two readings concerning sundials, also by Warrington Hogg, who died in 1893.

Garth
Garth, Fascinating topic! :) I sure hope that your listeners are inspired to take a look at Warrington Hogg's illustrations after hearing your reading, because the sundials are beautifully rendered. I was doing a little sleuthing to find his birth date for the catalog (1862); he died at 31, what a pity. He was also, I find, a noted book plate designer.

Hugh will be along shortly to do the formal PLing. I enjoyed listening!
Regards,

Veggrower
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Post by Veggrower » September 5th, 2013, 11:33 am

Hi Sue,

Thanks for the information about Warrington Hogg. I'd previously done some research on him as well, and did find references to his designs for book-plates, but couldn't find his date of birth or any other definite details about him. I'd no idea he was so young when he died; he probably would have gone on to write many other interesting pieces. As you say, a pity. I agree, his illustrations are great, and he was obviously a very talented artist.

Garth

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » September 5th, 2013, 1:31 pm

Hi Garth,
The reference I found with Warrington Hogg's dates was on p. 113 in a book about bookplates-- Dated Book-plates (Ex-libris), With a Treatise on Their Origin and Development , which actually looks like an interesting read in and of itself!

Veggrower
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Post by Veggrower » September 5th, 2013, 11:14 pm

Thanks for that reference, Sue - I'll have a look at that book.
I forgot to mention before that apparently his full name was Herbert Warrington Hogg, as per this book,
http://books.google.co.uk/books/about/Sundials.html?id=Zo7HQAAACAAJ&redir_esc=y
which I think is just the two sundials articles combined.

Garth

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » September 6th, 2013, 7:26 am

Herbert Hogg . . . no wonder he wrote under his middle name.

HughGil
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Post by HughGil » September 6th, 2013, 3:12 pm

Veggrower wrote:Hi Sue,

Following on from the piece about weathercocks in SNF029, here are two readings concerning sundials, also by Warrington Hogg, who died in 1893. These three articles, which all appeared in the Strand Magazine, seem to be the only things he published. I think they're interesting, not just for the facts about sundials, but also for the snippets of history and touches of humour.

Sundials, part one: http://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf031_sundialspartone_hogg_gb_128kb.mp3

Source: http://archive.org/stream/TheStrandMagazineAnIllustratedMonthly/TheStrandMagazine1892aVol.IiiJan-jun#page/n606/mode/1up

The length is 13:32

Sundials, part two: http://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf031_sundialsparttwo_hogg_gb_128kb.mp3

Source: http://archive.org/stream/TheStrandMagazineAnIllustratedMonthly/TheStrandMagazine1893bVol.ViJul-dec#page/n317/mode/1up

Length is 23:32. Thanks,

Garth
Hi Garth and Sue,

Part 1 is PL okay. :D

Unfortunately, when I download part 2, it comes up as an empty file. :shock:

Hugh
"the story seems to take forever to go anywhere - and I know where it is going." - m8b1 2012

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » September 6th, 2013, 7:33 pm

Hi Garth and Sue,

Part 1 is PL okay. :D

Unfortunately, when I download part 2, it comes up as an empty file. :shock:

Hugh
Hi Hugh and Garth--Hugh, thanks for PLing (or trying!) :) ; part 2 was there when I listened to it. I'm guessing this has to do with the troubles they are having going over to the new system; when things calm down, I'll let Jo know and see if it can be fixed without Garth having to upload again. For now, lets all just let things ride. It was PL OK, by the way, but now we need the file!!
Cheers,

HughGil
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Location: California

Post by HughGil » September 7th, 2013, 6:42 am

Morning Sue,

Well, this is strange. I was able to download part 2, partially.
The first time it was 14:14 minutes in length...
the second time it was 13:00 minutes in length...
the third time it was 11:00 minutes in length...

I'm going to stop downloading it fearing that it might just disappear all together. :lol:

Hugh
"the story seems to take forever to go anywhere - and I know where it is going." - m8b1 2012

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » September 7th, 2013, 8:12 am

Hi Hugh, well, sundials record fleeting moments in time . . . seriously, I think the admin's were moving files that were uploaded to "dev.librivox" to just "librivox," at least that's the way the files are reading in the MW now. I just tried downloading part 2 just now, and it came through fine.
Cheers,

knotyouraveragejo
LibriVox Admin Team
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Post by knotyouraveragejo » September 7th, 2013, 8:21 am

That's correct, Sue. All the file links should be working again. The files themselves have always been safe and sound on the server. It's just the links have changed. If anything still has dev. in the link, that needs to be removed. This should have happened sometime in the last 24 h for all the links in the Listen URL columns in all the magic windows.

If you run across any links that are still not working, let me know and we'll get them fixed. :)
Jo
My Librivox Solos
Books are the carriers of civilization. Without books, history is silent, literature dumb, science crippled, thought and speculation at a standstill. - Barbara Tuchman

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