What if there is a really nasty word in a recording?

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russiandoll
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Post by russiandoll » April 29th, 2010, 6:31 am

jedopi wrote:I just wanted to let any "sensitive" readers out there know that I don't approve of the word, but that's the way it was back then and I can't change that.

As was mentioned above, you can include a note in the catalogue summary warning listeners of potentially offensive language content if you feel it appropriate.

And if you meant other LVers, well, they usually have their own projects to concern themselves with and aren't going to be looking over your shoulder scrutinising your choice of texts and making judgements on you! We pretty much all know that old books have old language and old opinions in them, and that a voice is not the same as an endorsement.
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Samanem
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Post by Samanem » May 14th, 2010, 7:50 am

What if the text says "d--n"? Should I read that as "damn"?

TriciaG
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Post by TriciaG » May 14th, 2010, 8:00 am

Samanem wrote:What if the text says "d--n"? Should I read that as "damn"?
I say a kind of swallowed "dn". 8-)
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chocoholic
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Post by chocoholic » May 14th, 2010, 9:08 am

Samanem wrote:What if the text says "d--n"? Should I read that as "damn"?
I had that once and just read it as "damn." Though it was a Western, so I could just as well have said "durn," I guess. (It is so obvious it is supposed to be "damn" though...) Anyway, attempts of mine to convey "d--n" any other way than just saying the word did not work at all. Tricia is more talented than I am. :D
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Post by KiltedDragon » May 14th, 2010, 11:41 am

I've had readers read exactly what is there, "d blank n".
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MARTIN GEESON
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Post by MARTIN GEESON » May 14th, 2010, 11:55 am

Hi

In rumbustious 18th century texts, full of flamboyant oaths (at which I am becoming a veteran), I find that anything less than the full damn makes for a damp squib effect and spoils the passage.

After all, the ----s and ****s are meant to be suggestive for the eye. They implicitly mock the censorship that they are observing. You can't do that in audio. When I come to read (in some days' time) Sterne's sentence: "The old mule let a f..." I shall certainly be translating the dots aurally.

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Samanem
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Post by Samanem » May 14th, 2010, 12:10 pm

D**n it all, it's the full d**n "d**n" for me then!

I appreciate the quick help!
Last edited by Samanem on May 31st, 2010, 7:56 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Samanem
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Post by Samanem » May 14th, 2010, 12:11 pm

Sorry, that should have been "...the d**n quick help!" of course.

(note - as per the post below, I changed my posts here - I couldn't stomach using that word all those times and it was nagging at me! :roll: )
Last edited by Samanem on May 31st, 2010, 7:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.

catchpenny
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Post by catchpenny » May 14th, 2010, 9:04 pm

Samanem wrote:Sorry, that should have been "...the damn quick help!" of course.
No, it should have been: "d--n quick help!" :P
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