Food, Cookery and Recipes

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kri
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Post by kri » March 26th, 2006, 1:28 pm

Well whatever it is, it sounds great to me!

Kristen
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Post by Kristen » March 26th, 2006, 4:21 pm

Our barbeque (scheduled for tomorrow as it turns out) will be a western style one. The beef is a big chunk that I will cut into steaks. I don't think I have the knife skills to slice paper-thin pieces for yakiniku.
Kristen
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Gesine
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Post by Gesine » March 26th, 2006, 5:08 pm

Yes, I always admire people who can make anything paper-thin... can't do it at all myself - at least not quickly, and I lack the patience to spend hours on cutting things.

Have fun at your BBQ!
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vee
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Post by vee » March 27th, 2006, 9:48 am

Paper thin slices of beef are a lot easier if you use a standard deli slicer. Just freeze the meet ahead of time and it works wonders. Watch your fingers though.

Actually you can slice meat thin using just a standard chef's knife too. Don't completely freeze the meat, just enough to make it a bit stiff. I par-freeze all just about everything I need to cut up.
Chris Vee
"You never truly understand something until you can explain it to your grandmother." - Albert Einstein

Kristen
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Post by Kristen » March 27th, 2006, 6:22 pm

Good idea to chill the meat before slicing. I haven't a deli slicer at hand, but I do have a mandoline that I find very handy for vegetables. Won't work on meat - too small.

Luckily the majority of beef in Japan is sliced wafer-thin for yakiniku, shabu-shabu and other dishes.
Kristen
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Peter Why
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Post by Peter Why » May 23rd, 2006, 2:54 am

Kara, Gesine,

Now Spring is well under way, did either of you try that Caponata recipe? It's starting to get warm enough here for me to start making it, and I wondered whether either of you had.

Peter
"I think, therefore I am, I think." Solomon Cohen, in Terry Pratchett's Dodger

Gesine
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Post by Gesine » May 24th, 2006, 3:39 pm

No, haven't - but good idea. Should try it soon. The tomatoes are getting seriously good here.
"Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination circles the world." Albert Einstein

Kristen
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Post by Kristen » May 28th, 2006, 4:21 pm

I made the caponata (with a few variations to account for local produce) for a party of fifteen last night and it got raves. It really was the best I've ever made and perhaps the best I've ever eaten.

Thanks for sharing your recipe. I'll post my version on mediatinker.com on Thursday, in case you care to see how I adjusted it.
Kristen
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Peter Why
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Post by Peter Why » May 28th, 2006, 5:20 pm

That's great! I loved it, too, when I made it ... such a powerful mixture of flavours and textures.

I'll have a look at what you've done to the recipe, at the end of the week.

Peter
"I think, therefore I am, I think." Solomon Cohen, in Terry Pratchett's Dodger

Peter Why
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Post by Peter Why » June 4th, 2006, 2:51 am

Kristen,

Nice site; it'll be interesting to see whether you get any comments .. and any other experimenters trying the recipe. Why did you use anchovies rather than garlic? Antisociability of garlic? (I've never cooked with anchovies ... partly because I use fish so little anyway, partly because I've spent much of my life cooking for vegetarians.)

Peter
"I think, therefore I am, I think." Solomon Cohen, in Terry Pratchett's Dodger

thistlechick
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Post by thistlechick » June 4th, 2006, 10:24 am

We have another Cookbook in the works if any of you feel like reading a bit on the topic: Good Things to Eat as Suggested by Rufus http://librivox.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=2440

=)
~ Betsie
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DSayers
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Post by DSayers » June 4th, 2006, 5:19 pm

thistlechick wrote:We have another Cookbook in the works if any of you feel like reading a bit on the topic: Good Things to Eat as Suggested by Rufus http://librivox.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=2440

=)
Thanks, Betsie! Rufus Este's cookbook is busily accepting subscriptions from readers ...

-denny
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Kristen
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Post by Kristen » June 23rd, 2006, 3:57 pm

Peter Why wrote:Why did you use anchovies rather than garlic? Antisociability of garlic? (I've never cooked with anchovies ... partly because I use fish so little anyway, partly because I've spent much of my life cooking for vegetarians.)
Some of the other dishes in my menu that night were garlic-heavy and I wanted to give the guests a break. I find that anchovies make a surprisingly good substitute for garlic - they add a certain depth and mouth feel to a dish that garlic also produces.

My favorite ever pasta sauce is putanesca: garlic, anchovies, capers, olives (green and black), crushed tomatoes - and spicy red pepper if desired. Takes about 5 minutes to make and never fails to please even those who don't like anchovies. The recipe, such as it is, is here:

http://www.mediatinker.com/blog/archives/007386.html
Kristen
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Peter Why
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Post by Peter Why » August 5th, 2006, 1:36 pm

While I'm typing this, my room is full of the smell of vegetarian Worcestershire sauce simmering (vegetarian, because it doesn't include anchovies). It should be ready to bottle in a month's time. Lovely rich smell, eye prickling ... and, the way I'm making this batch, a fine way of using up the vinegar left from home-made pickled shallots. Anyone want the recipe?

Peter
"I think, therefore I am, I think." Solomon Cohen, in Terry Pratchett's Dodger

Kristen
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Post by Kristen » August 5th, 2006, 5:39 pm

Peter Why wrote:vegetarian Worcestershire sauce ...Anyone want the recipe?
Yes! That sounds wonderful.
Kristen
http://www.mediatinker.com
[url=http://librivox.org/wiki/moin.cgi/KristenMcQuillin/]My recordings & claimed chapters[/url]

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