[FULL] Tales of 1927: A Selection of Folktales, Fables, and Legends from Books Published in 1927 - rap

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Post by laurakgibbs »

TALES OF 1927: A Selection of Folktales, Fables, and Legends from Books Published in 1927, by various authors

Volunteers outside the USA: Blaise Cendrars died in 1961. This person's work may still be protected by copyright in countries where copyright duration is determined by the author's death date. In Europe this is 70 years; in Canada it is 70 years for authors who died after 1971; and in Australia it is 70 years for authors who died after 1955.

Volunteers outside the USA: Arthur Huff Fauset died in 1983. This person's work may still be protected by copyright in countries where copyright duration is determined by the author's death date. In Europe this is 70 years; in Canada it is 70 years for authors who died after 1971; and in Australia it is 70 years for authors who died after 1955.

Volunteers outside the USA: Karl Felix Wolff died in 1966. This person's work may still be protected by copyright in countries where copyright duration is determined by the author's death date. In Europe this is 70 years; in Canada it is 70 years for authors who died after 1971; and in Australia it is 70 years for authors who died after 1955.

Volunteers outside the USA: James Cloyd Bowman died in 1961. This person's work may still be protected by copyright in countries where copyright duration is determined by the author's death date. In Europe this is 70 years; in Canada it is 70 years for authors who died after 1971; and in Australia it is 70 years for authors who died after 1955.

Volunteers outside the USA: Winona Blanche Allanson died in 1981. This person's work may still be protected by copyright in countries where copyright duration is determined by the author's death date. In Europe this is 70 years; in Canada it is 70 years for authors who died after 1971; and in Australia it is 70 years for authors who died after 1955.

Volunteers outside the USA: Clement Doke died in 1980. This person's work may still be protected by copyright in countries where copyright duration is determined by the author's death date. In Europe this is 70 years; in Canada it is 70 years for authors who died after 1971; and in Australia it is 70 years for authors who died after 1955.

Volunteers outside the USA: Marguerite Aspinwall died in 1982. This person's work may still be protected by copyright in countries where copyright duration is determined by the author's death date. In Europe this is 70 years; in Canada it is 70 years for authors who died after 1971; and in Australia it is 70 years for authors who died after 1955.

Volunteers outside the USA: Cheridah de Beauvoir Stocks died in 1971. This person's work may still be protected by copyright in countries where copyright duration is determined by the author's death date. In Europe this is 70 years; in Canada it is 70 years for authors who died after 1971; and in Australia it is 70 years for authors who died after 1955.
This anthology of folktales, fables, and legends has been selected from twenty different books published (or re-published) in 1927, covering a range of European stories (ancient and modern) along with stories from the Americas, Africa, South Asia, and East Asia. Many, but not all, of the stories are for young readers.

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

Ancient Greece: "Ulysses and the Bag of Winds" by William H. Elson [1854-1935] published in The Elson Readers: Three.
Ancient Rome: "The Wanderings of Aeneas" by H. L. Havell [1863-1913] published in Stories from the Aeneid.
Ancient Rome: "The Frogs Ask for a King" by Bernard Pares [1867-1949] published in Krylov's Fables.
Medieval Europe: "Herod and the Bubbles" by F.J.H. Darton [1878-1936] published in A Wonder Book of Old Romance.
Ladin (northern Italy): "King Laurin's Rose Garden" by Karl Felix Wolff [1879-1966] published in The Pale Mountains: Folk Tales From the Dolomites.
Ireland: "Princess Fior Usga" by Thomas Crofton Croker [1798-1854] published in A Book of Princess Stories.
U.S.A.: "The Growing Boy" by James Cloyd Bowman [1880-1961] published in The Adventures of Paul Bunyan.
Pueblo (Native American): "Coyote and Evening Star" by Ahlee James published in Tewa Firelight Tales.
Dakota (Native American): "The Story of White Dawn" by Winona Blanche Allanson [1897-1981] published in Indian Moons.
Tlingit (Native American): "Beaver and Porcupine" by Elizabeth Bishop Johnson published in Animal Stories the Indians Told.
African-American (southern U.S.): "Rabbit Tales" by Arthur Huff Fauset [1899-1983] published in "Negro Tales from the South," in Journal of American Folklore, v. 40.
Lamba (central Africa): "Mr. Warthog and Mr. Lion" by Clement Doke [1893-1980] published in Lamba Folk Lore.
Hausa (western Africa): "Cayman, Man, and Jackal" by Blaise Cendrars [1887-1961] published in The African Saga.
Swahili (eastern Africa): "The Man Befriended by Luck" by E. C. Baker published in "Swahili Tales," in Folklore, v. 38.
Morocco: "The Fatal House" by Edward Powys Mathers [1892-1939] published in Eastern Love: Tales of Fez.
Pashtun (South Asia): "How the Greedy Princess Was Tricked" by Lucas White King [1856-1925] published in "Shirani Folktales," in Folklore, v. 38.
Buddhist (India): "The Grateful Animals" by Marguerite Aspinwall [1888-1982] published in Jataka Tales Out of Old India.
Lepcha (South Asia): "A Fairy Disguised as a Puppy" by Cheridah de Beauvoir Stocks [1887–1971] published in Folklore and Customs of the Lap-chas of Sikhim.
East Asia: "Moko and the Twelve Little Earth Men" by Charles H. Meeker [1873-1950] published in Folk Tales from the Far East.
Japan: "The Weaver of the Frost" by Ken Nakazawa [1883-1953] published in The Weaver of the Frost. (Summary by Laura Gibbs)
Source text (please read only from this text!):
https://archive.org/details/tales-of-1927

Deadline: Please submit your recording within 2 months of placing your claim. If you cannot complete the recording within this time, please post in the thread to relinquish your claim or to ask the BC for an extension. If your recording is not completed by the deadline, your claim may be reassigned at the BC's discretion.

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Magic Window:



BC Admin
========================================
Genres for the project: Children's Fiction/Myths, Legends & Fairy Tales; Fantastic Fiction/Myths, Legends & Fairy Tales
Keywords that describe the book: fairy tales, folktales, myths, Legends
========================================

LibriVox recording settings: mono (1 channel), 44100 Hz sample rate, 128 kbps constant bit rate MP3. See the Tech Specs

Intro to recording:
Leave 0.5 to 1 second of silence at the beginning.

Say:
"Section # of TALES OF 1927. This is a LibriVox recording. All LibriVox recordings are in the public domain. For more information or to volunteer, please visit librivox.org." [Optional: "Read by your name."] Section Title."
IMPORTANT NOTE: For Section Title, please use the Section Title as supplied in the Magic Window above.

End of recording:
Say:
"End of section #." [Optional, and if not stated in the intro: "Read by your name, city, date."]
If you are recording the final section of the book, add:
"End of TALES OF 1927: A Selection of Folktales, Fables, and Legends from Books Published in 1927, by various authors"
Leave 5 seconds of silence at the end.

Filename: talesof1927_##_various_128kb.mp3 where ## is the section number. (e.g. talesof1927_01_various_128kb.mp3)

Upload to the LibriVox Uploader: https://librivox.org/login/uploader
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Copy and paste the file link generated by the uploader into a new post in this thread along with the file duration (mm:ss). Watch this thread for prooflistening notes.

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laurakgibbs
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Post by laurakgibbs »

Hello! I added -rap here to the subject line because I am hoping Rapunzelina will be able to MC this project... it has the same format as the Tales of 1928 that we just completed ... and THANK YOU for all your help figuring out the best way to do these, Rapunzelina! I will be able to set up the Magic Window quickly and get you the metadata you need right from the start based on how that worked last time. :D

I will DPL.
Rapunzelina
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Post by Rapunzelina »

We have a Magic Window!
Now that you're more familiar with the Magic Windows, you'll probably be able to enter the authors and sources yourself in the metadata (the magnifying glass icon)
I'll need to add any new authors to the database before you can do that, of course, unless all authors are already in the database. I'll have more time to check the authors tomorrow!
laurakgibbs
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Post by laurakgibbs »

Rapunzelina wrote: April 2nd, 2024, 1:56 pm We have a Magic Window!
Now that you're more familiar with the Magic Windows, you'll probably be able to enter the authors and sources yourself in the metadata (the magnifying glass icon)
I'll need to add any new authors to the database before you can do that, of course, unless all authors are already in the database. I'll have more time to check the authors tomorrow!
Oh, I am excited to learn how to do the metadata! I think most of the authors are new. I was able to choose Croker from the dropdown, and Havell I think... I didn't keep track, but if that popup comes from the database, then they are indeed mostly new. So, let me know when it's safe for me to give that a try.

In my spreadsheet, I have all the links to Hathi and Internet Archive for the metadata, and then I'll link to the pages in our specific PDF anthology at the Archive for the Magic Window like last time. That solution worked out so nicely! I will enter the stories in the magic window later today :D
silverquill
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Post by silverquill »

Could I read for this volume two African stories?

Lamba (central Africa): "Mr. Warthog and Mr. Lion" by Clement Doke [1893-1980] published in Lamba Folk Lore.
Hausa (western Africa): "Cayman, Man, and Jackal" by Blaise Cendrars [1887-1961] published in The African Saga.
On the road again, so delays are possible
~ Larry
laurakgibbs
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Post by laurakgibbs »

silverquill wrote: April 2nd, 2024, 2:35 pm Could I read for this volume two African stories?

Lamba (central Africa): "Mr. Warthog and Mr. Lion" by Clement Doke [1893-1980] published in Lamba Folk Lore.
Hausa (western Africa): "Cayman, Man, and Jackal" by Blaise Cendrars [1887-1961] published in The African Saga.
ABSOLUTELY, Larry! Those are both fabulous stories, and they are variants on the same type in fact!
And if I do another solo soon, I'm tempted to do that whole Cendrars book; it is full of brilliant stuff. I hope to get the magic window filled out later today and I'll mark those for you. Thank you for joining in again!!! :D
alanmapstone
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Post by alanmapstone »

May I read section 3?

I may ask for 1 or 2 others if that is OK!

EDIT: May I read section 1 as well
Alan
the sixth age shifts into the slippered pantaloon with spectacles on nose
laurakgibbs
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Post by laurakgibbs »

alanmapstone wrote: April 2nd, 2024, 3:39 pm May I read section 3?

I may ask for 1 or 2 others if that is OK!

EDIT: May I read section 1 as well
Yay, I'll put you down for Odysseus section 1 (it is a very charming retelling of that story about the winds!) and section 3 Frogs. :thumbs:
4324GF
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Post by 4324GF »

Hi

May I claim section 19: A Folktale from East Asia

section 10: Animal Stories the Indians Told, Beaver and Porcupine

and
Section 11: Rabbit Tales? this one has short stories with numbers at the beginning of each one, should I read these numbers?

Please let me know

Thank you
Gila
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Post by laurakgibbs »

4324GF wrote: April 2nd, 2024, 4:44 pm Hi

May I claim section 19: A Folktale from East Asia

section 10: Animal Stories the Indians Told, Beaver and Porcupine

and
Section 11: Rabbit Tales? this one has short stories with numbers at the beginning of each one, should I read these numbers?

Please let me know

Thank you
Gila
DONE! It is so nice to be working with you again, Gila!

About the Rabbit Tales: no need to read the numbers! As you can tell, I chose some stories from a big collection (it was so hard to choose just a few!); the numbers come from that original collection, but they are not relevant here. If you are curious, here's the whole collection:
https://archive.org/details/journalofamerica0040unse/page/213/mode/1up
The folklorist who collected all those stories, Arthur Fauset, is a hero of mine! There is a nice piece about his work here:
https://notablefolkloristsofcolor.org/portfolio/arthur-huff-fauset/
4324GF
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Post by 4324GF »

Thank you.

Very cool. I will definitely check him out!

Gila
alanmapstone
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Post by alanmapstone »

Section 1 - Ulysses

https://librivox.org/uploads/rapunzelina/talesof1927_01_various_128kb.mp3
5.21

I have always liked this story, I love the idea of a "Bag of Winds" What I like about the Greek Gods is that they show such human emotions like getting angry and annoyed with people. :lol:
Alan
the sixth age shifts into the slippered pantaloon with spectacles on nose
laurakgibbs
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Post by laurakgibbs »

alanmapstone wrote: April 6th, 2024, 3:04 am Section 1 - Ulysses

https://librivox.org/uploads/rapunzelina/talesof1927_01_various_128kb.mp3
5.21

I have always liked this story, I love the idea of a "Bag of Winds" What I like about the Greek Gods is that they show such human emotions like getting angry and annoyed with people. :lol:
Yay, Alan! I am so glad that you are our first storyteller! I've updated MW and will listen this afternoon (Saturday). Meanwhile, the winds are really blowing here this morning, ha ha. I guess we have Odysseus to thank/blame for that. :-)
BobbyBreadshower
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Post by BobbyBreadshower »

Hello,

May I read section 7, The Growing Boy? This would be the first recording I've done for Librivox.
I'm Afraid of Americans - David Bowie
laurakgibbs
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Post by laurakgibbs »

BobbyBreadshower wrote: April 6th, 2024, 9:11 am Hello,

May I read section 7, The Growing Boy? This would be the first recording I've done for Librivox.
Fantastic! I take it to be a sign of good luck when someone is doing their first recording for a group project like this. Yay!

I've put the section in my name for now so that no one else will claim it, and to transfer it to you, I'll need to enter you into the readers database... so, let me know:
1) the name you want to use for display in the LibriVox catalog (if different from your user name here)
2) if you have a webpage you want that display name to link to

When you do that, I'll assign the section to you, and then you can record. The Paul Bunyan stories are a hoot; I hope you will enjoy it! (you will learn how Babe the Blue Ox became blue!)
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