Pronunciation help: all languages

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clionawoodbyrne
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Post by clionawoodbyrne » October 3rd, 2020, 4:34 am

mightyfelix wrote:
October 2nd, 2020, 9:52 pm
clionawoodbyrne wrote:
September 30th, 2020, 3:25 am
clionawoodbyrne wrote:
September 27th, 2020, 3:52 am

Hi
Here is phonetic pronouncation.
1. Till un cruh, a Ghunna-cha.
(NB: The 'Gh' sound there is like the hard G in the word Gun, but not as hard. More like an infant gurgling.
And the 'ch' sound is like the 'ch' in Loch Ness or the 'ch' sound in "Och, aye!" Not the 'ch' sound in "church".
If that's too tricky, you could go for
Till un cruh, a Gunna-ka (inaccurate, but close).
2. Coo-wa un ir vo-ir.
3. A chonga, a dee-yul vo-ir. Thaw too egg daynuv brayag

I am trying to get a recording of the above for you from my Irish speaking brother in law. I will upload it if possible. In the meantime see how you get on.
Cheers
Cliona.
Hi Devorah

Here is the sound bite of how to say the words. I am not sure of the sound quality but give it a go.

https://librivox.org/uploads/tests/pronouncation_1.mp3

Cheers
Cliona
I went ahead and recorded my chapters, giving it my best go. But if you have the time and the inclination to double check my attempts, I have uploaded them here (with a bit of context around them from the chapters).

https://librivox.org/uploads/xx-nonproject/malcolm_gaelicsample.mp3
Hi Devorah

Well done, great job. You must have Irish genes in you as you sound like a native 👍
Cliona

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Post by mightyfelix » October 3rd, 2020, 8:16 am

Aww, thanks, Cliona! I believe I do have some Irish, but it's a few hundred years back, so I don't know how much it counts for! :lol:

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Post by ezwa » October 10th, 2020, 11:04 pm

Hello,

I need help for three languages. If someone could record the sentences at normal speed and syllable by syllable (I'm no good at reading phonetic spelling) and post it here...
One is German: "es ist mir Wurst" - "Ia wohl"

The second is Italian (or Spanish?): "Lasciate ogni speranza"

The last is romanized Japanese: "Nanzo amochiroi chimboun wa gozarimasenou Ka?" - "Sakoudjitsou yori Konnitchi wa tenki ga yorochi."
Ezwa

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schrm
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Post by schrm » October 11th, 2020, 1:48 am

ezwa wrote:
October 10th, 2020, 11:04 pm
Hello,

I need help for three languages. If someone could record the sentences at normal speed and syllable by syllable (I'm no good at reading phonetic spelling) and post it here...
One is German: "es ist mir Wurst" - "Ia wohl"

The second is Italian (or Spanish?): "Lasciate ogni speranza"

The last is romanized Japanese: "Nanzo amochiroi chimboun wa gozarimasenou Ka?" - "Sakoudjitsou yori Konnitchi wa tenki ga yorochi."
german: is it bajuvaria-german? i know this as sayings from the south of germany, only. and the spoken words may differ drastically. meaning is "i don't care"
the second word is "jawohl"? (it is a sort of military-yes, old fashioned maybe, taking a command or order)

the third is italian, a famous quote from the divina comedia. meaning is something like "forget all hope" "give away all hope"

i recorded italian and german for you:

https://librivox.org/uploads/tests/pronunciation.mp3

hope this helps
cheers
wolfi

edit: sonia helped me with the source and translation of the italian sentence! Divina Comedia by Dante: "Abandon hope all ye who enter"
...it was in the morning and i didn't drink my first coffee..
Last edited by schrm on October 11th, 2020, 5:56 am, edited 1 time in total.
en: lay down your arms, essays on art by goethe
de: sammlung prosa, hoffmann*2: sommerfrische, tante fritzchen
dpl: hoffmann*2

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ezwa
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Post by ezwa » October 11th, 2020, 2:23 am

schrm wrote:
October 11th, 2020, 1:48 am
[...] i recorded italian and german for you [...]

Thanks a lot, wolfi, it helps!

So, now, I only need the romanized Japanese: "Nanzo amochiroi chimboun wa gozarimasenou Ka?" - "Sakoudjitsou yori Konnitchi wa tenki ga yorochi."
Ezwa

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Post by Kazbek » October 11th, 2020, 6:53 am

ezwa wrote:
October 11th, 2020, 2:23 am
So, now, I only need the romanized Japanese: "Nanzo amochiroi chimboun wa gozarimasenou Ka?" - "Sakoudjitsou yori Konnitchi wa tenki ga yorochi."
My Japanese is very limited, but I'll give it a crack. I believe these are transcriptions of the following Japanese phrases, which you can paste into Google Translate to hear their text-to-speech synthesis (clicking the icon a second time gives a slower reading):

何ぞ面白い新聞わございませんか?
さくじつよりこんにちわ天気がよろし

I'm pretty sure the first one means "what interesting newspapers do you have?", but I'm puzzled by the response. If I had to make a guess, it sounds like someone who doesn't speak Japanese well is trying to read the phrase "the weather today is better than yesterday," but they use incorrect alternate pronunciations of the kanji for comic effect ("sakujitstu" instead of "kino" and "konnichi" instead of "kyo")... how's that for going out on a limb? Shouldn't affect the pronunciation, though.

Michael

ezwa
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Post by ezwa » October 11th, 2020, 9:22 am

Merci beaucoup, Michael ! I hadn't realised that google translate could render a reading. That's handy!

L'auteur explique ces phrases de cette manière :
Quoi de nouveau ? Littéralement : N'avez-vous pas quelque nouvelle intéressante ?
et
Le temps est plus beau aujourd'hui qu'hier. Dans le cas actuel, cette phrase signifie : Il y a du mieux.


For those who want to know, I just quoted what the author said about the meaning of the Japanese sentences.
Ezwa

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Post by ezwa » October 13th, 2020, 6:12 am

Hello,

I'm back for some German (just to make sure) and some Gascon.
For the former, I'd like to know if in "Galeeren Sclave" the "s" and "a" in "sclave" are pronounced the same way as in "slave." (I would have thought the "s" was like a French "ch" and the "a" like in "are" but google translate sees otherwise.

For the latter, would anyone know how to pronounce* this (Gascon)?
LOU MARIDATJE DOU PINSAN
La cardino e lou pinsan,
S’en bolen marida douman ;
Qu’en bolen he no béro hesto ;
Mes de pan n’an brico de resto.
Lan liro,

If not, does anyone know if I could err on the side of Spanish pronunciation for it?
Not that I speak Spanish, hehehe, but at least I could work something out other than a French pronunciation.

*again, I'm no good with written pronunciation. So, if you know, a recording would be very kind. It could be uploaded onto the server, "ez-ezwa" MC folder and posted either here or in the project's thread.
Ezwa

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Post by Kitty » October 13th, 2020, 6:17 am

ezwa wrote:
October 13th, 2020, 6:12 am
For the former, I'd like to know if in "Galeeren Sclave" the "s" and "a" in "sclave" are pronounced the same way as in "slave." (I would have thought the "s" was like a French "ch" and the "a" like in "are" but google translate sees otherwise.
this is probably because you mis-spelled it. In German it's spelled "Sklave" and you pronounce it exactly like the French "esclave" without the first 'e' of course, and you have to pronounce the last 'e', not make it half-mute like in French. With the right spelling I guess you can listen to it in google.

For Gascon I cannot help unfortunately. Maybe we have a Southern French reader in our group. :hmm:

Sonia
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Post by ezwa » October 13th, 2020, 6:26 am

Thanks, Sonia! I think google was pronouncing it the way you say without the last "e." It's now clear to me.

For Gascon, we'll see.
Ezwa

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Post by Kitty » October 13th, 2020, 6:32 am

ezwa wrote:
October 13th, 2020, 6:26 am
I think google was pronouncing it the way you say without the last "e." It's now clear to me.
I checked google now... "sclave" they said almost the English way, which was wrong. (wrong 'a') but "Sklave" they say correctly, with an 'a' like in "are" as you said.

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Post by ezwa » October 13th, 2020, 9:09 am

OK. Thanks, Sonia!
Ezwa

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Post by maxgal » October 14th, 2020, 5:50 pm

Peter Why wrote:
October 2nd, 2020, 6:26 pm
The difficulty with the Welsh accent is not in the pronunciation of the individual words but with the overall variation in tone through each sentence. It's been called "musical". There are some quite a good videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cq-mEejECcU and here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gb8Bps3bG84 The last one has different Welsh speakers giving examples of vowel sounds.

It's worth waiting for a Librivox helper who has more experience, though.

Peter
Thanks to you too, Peter! :D
After my usual procrastination, I finally finished off this section today, mangled Welsh accent & all.
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Post by msfry » December 21st, 2020, 7:56 am

What is keeping me from finishing The Crock of Gold, are these 3 paragraphs in the last chapter, a roundup of dozens of Irish gods whose names I cannot pronounce. If any authentic Irish speaker can help, I'd be so grateful. A list of the names is provided under the paragraphs.

"Of those who came were Aine Ni Rogail of Cnoc Aine and Ivil of Craglea, the queens of North and South Munster, and Una the queen of Ormond; these, with their hosts, sang upon the summit of the hill welcoming the god. There came the five guardians of Ulster, the fomentors of combat:—Brier Mac Belgan of Dromona Breg, Redg Rotbill from the slopes of Magh-Itar, Tinnel the son of Boclacthna of Slieve Edlicon, Grici of Cruachan-Aigle, a goodly name, and Gulban Glas Mac Grici, whose dun is in the Ben of Gulban. These five, matchless in combat, marched up the hill with their tribes, shouting as they went. From north and south they came, and from east and west, bright and happy beings, a multitude, without fear, without distraction, so that soon the hill was gay with their voices and their noble raiment.

Among them came the people of the Lupra, the ancient Leprecauns of the world, leaping like goats among the knees of the heroes. They were headed by their king Udan Mac Audain and Beg Mac Beg his tanist, and, following behind, was Glomhar O’Glomrach of the sea, the strongest man of their people, dressed in the skin of a weasel; and there were also the chief men of that clan, well known of old, Conan Mac Rihid, Gaerku Mac Gairid, Mether Mac Mintan and Esirt Mac Beg, the son of Bueyen, born in a victory. This king was that same Udan the chief of the Lupra who had been placed under bonds to taste the porridge in the great cauldron of Emania, into which pot he fell, and was taken captive with his wife, and held for five weary years, until he surrendered that which he most valued in the world, even his boots: the people of the hills laugh still at the story, and the Leprecauns may still be mortified by it.

There came Bove Derg, the Fiery, seldom seen, and his harper the son of Trogain, whose music heals the sick and makes the sad heart merry; Rochy Mac Elathan, Dagda Mor, the Father of Stars, and his daughter from the Cave of Cruachan; Credh Mac Aedh of Raghery and Cas Corach son of the great Ollav; Mananaan Mac Lir came from his wide waters shouting louder than the wind, with his daughters Cliona and Aoife and Etain Fair-Hair; and Coll and Cecht and Mac Greina, the Plough, the Hazel, and the Sun came with their wives, whose names are not forgotten, even Banba and Fodla and Eire, names of glory. Lugh of the Long-Hand, filled with mysterious wisdom, was not absent, whose father was sadly avenged on the sons of Turann—these with their hosts."

Aine Ni Rogail of Cnoc Aine
Ivil of Craglea
Brier Mac Belgan of Dromona Breg
Redg Rotbill from the slopes of Magh-Itar
Tinnel the son of Boclacthna of Slieve Edlicon
Grici of Cruachan-Aigle
Gulban Glas Mac Grici
Udan Mac Audain
Glomhar O’Glomrach
Conan Mac Rihid
Gaerku Mac Gairid
Mether Mac Mintan
Esirt Mac Beg, the son of Bueyen
cauldron of Emania
Bove Derg, the Fiery
Trogain
Rochy Mac Elathan
Dagda Mor, the Father of Stars
Cave of Cruachan
Credh Mac Aedh of Raghery
Cas Corach son of the great Ollav
Mananaan Mac Lir
Cliona and Aoife and Etain Fair-Hair
Coll and Cecht and Mac Greina
Banba and Fodla and Eire
Lugh of the Long-Hand
sons of Turann
Michele Fry, CC
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Post by JoannaHoyt » January 17th, 2021, 5:14 am

Alas, I can't help with the Irish names, but have a name pronunciation question of my own: I'm reading Leo Tolstoy's "What Shall We Do?" and am about to start the chapter detailing his visit to the Rzhanoff buildings. I am at a loss as to how to pronounce the initial "Rzh." Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Since it's a name not a word, Forvo doesn't have it.

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