[COMPLETE]Multilingual Short Works Collection 024 - thw

Solo or group recordings that are finished and fully available for listeners
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Kitty
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Post by Kitty » June 16th, 2020, 5:54 am

Kazbek wrote:
June 16th, 2020, 5:40 am
Ooh, nice. It's in the MW. Sonia, is this another language you can PL? I'll be lurking in the wings if you need me. ;)
I can read the Greek alphabet, yes. Started a bit on old Greek, though I don't claim I remember much LOL for the pronounciation I will trust Liber ;) So I can PL it, I'm definitely curious to hear it.

Do you speak it more fluently, Michael ?

Sonia

Kazbek
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Post by Kazbek » June 16th, 2020, 6:00 am

Kitty wrote:
June 16th, 2020, 5:54 am
Kazbek wrote:
June 16th, 2020, 5:40 am
Ooh, nice. It's in the MW. Sonia, is this another language you can PL? I'll be lurking in the wings if you need me. ;)
I can read the Greek alphabet, yes. Started a bit on old Greek, though I don't claim I remember much LOL for the pronounciation I will trust Liber ;) So I can PL it, I'm definitely curious to hear it.

Do you speak it more fluently, Michael ?

Sonia
I think you should go for it, then! :D I'm pretty comfortable with Koine and Attic prose (passive comprehension only), but I haven't studied Aeolic before.

Michael

Kitty
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Post by Kitty » June 16th, 2020, 6:06 am

Liber wrote:
June 16th, 2020, 5:24 am
Sappho's Fragment 168 B does not seem to be on Librivox: so I have made an attempt at Ancient Greek.
Note that, for clarity's sake, I have kept the modern title and fragment number, while I have read the text from the 1920 source on archive.org .
I would definitely say the title in Ancient Greek though. This is the multilingual project after all so let's keep the languages ;)

I already had another Sappho poem in this previous project: https://librivox.org/multilingual-short-works-collection-022-poetry-prose-by-various/ Ἄστερες μὲν ἀμφὶ κάλαν σελάνναν and we put the title in Greek as well.

Could you only change that please and then the rest is all ok and flawless. :) Why do you think it's fragment 168b ? Here it says 52 :hmm:

Oh and careful with your volume. This one is at 92 dB, which is the top most limit for us to accept. My ears did hurt while listening with earplugs :? 2-3 dB less would have been better.

Michael, also please put the Greek title in the MW, with the transcription in brackets, like in the previous project (see link above).

Sonia

Kazbek
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Post by Kazbek » June 16th, 2020, 6:16 am

Kitty wrote:
June 16th, 2020, 6:06 am
Michael, also please put the Greek title in the MW, with the transcription in brackets, like in the previous project (see link above).
Done. No objection to the using the first line from this edition, I presume? Feel free to change as needed. I need to sign off for the workday soon. :)

Michael

Liber
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Post by Liber » June 16th, 2020, 6:36 am

To clarify, the fragment was preserved by Hephaestion in his Enchiridion, without any attribution. The fragment does not have a title and no-one really knows whether Sappho really was the author. Still, she is traditionally considered the author, so it seems reasonable to keep her name associated with the fragment.

The number in the 1920 source is arbitrary. In fact, the poem has been included in many collections with different numbers, often without mentioning any author.

In Eva-Maria Voigt's 1971 edition, the poem appeared as Fragment 168 B: since then this seems to have been the way the poem is identified.

If we want to make the title in Ancient Greek, "Δέδυκε μεν α σελάννα" seems OK to me.

Should I record the title in Greek ("Δέδυκε μεν α σελάννα"), and reduce the volume by 3dB? If needed I can also remove the reference to the Fragment number in Voigt's edition.

Liber

Kitty
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Post by Kitty » June 16th, 2020, 6:38 am

Liber wrote:
June 16th, 2020, 6:36 am
If we want to make the title in Ancient Greek, "Δέδυκε μεν α σελάννα" seems OK to me.
yes we often use the first line with poems that don't have a title.
Should I record the title in Greek ("Δέδυκε μεν α σελάννα"), and reduce the volume by 3dB? If needed I can also remove the reference to the Fragment number in Voigt's edition.
that wouldn't have bothered me so much, but yes please include the first line as title, reduce volume. Remove reference if you wish, but that is optional.

Thanks

Sonia

Liber
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Post by Liber » June 16th, 2020, 7:01 am

How about this?

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Δέδυκε μεν α σελάννα [Dèdiche mèn a selànna], Fragment 168 B, by Sappho (c. 630 – c. 570 BC)
Text URL: https://archive.org/details/sapphomemoirtex00bunngoog/page/n102/mode/2up?q=midnight
Duration: 0:43
MP3 URL: https://librivox.org/uploads/toddhw/msw024_dedukemenaselanna_sappho_le_128kb.mp3
Link to author on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sappho
Link to text on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Midnight_poem
Key Words: multilingual, ancient greek, poetry, hephaestion, enchiridion, sappho, moon, constellations, melancholy, sadness, loneliness
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————

Thank you for your feedback.
Liber

Kazbek
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Joined: April 24th, 2019, 12:06 pm

Post by Kazbek » June 16th, 2020, 3:12 pm

Liber wrote:
June 16th, 2020, 7:01 am
How about this?

———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
Δέδυκε μεν α σελάννα [Dèdiche mèn a selànna], Fragment 168 B, by Sappho (c. 630 – c. 570 BC)
Text URL: https://archive.org/details/sapphomemoirtex00bunngoog/page/n102/mode/2up?q=midnight
Duration: 0:43
MP3 URL: https://librivox.org/uploads/toddhw/msw024_dedukemenaselanna_sappho_le_128kb.mp3
Link to author on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sappho
Link to text on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Midnight_poem
Key Words: multilingual, ancient greek, poetry, hephaestion, enchiridion, sappho, moon, constellations, melancholy, sadness, loneliness
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————

Thank you for your feedback.
Liber
Thanks, MW updated. I'm assuming you intentionally omitted the accents on μὲν and ἁ.

Michael

Liber
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Post by Liber » June 16th, 2020, 3:32 pm

Oops, no, actually that was a mistake, I think it should be

Δέδυκε μὲν ἀ σελάννα [Dèdyke mèn a selànna], Fragment 168 B, by Sappho (c. 630 – c. 570 BC)

I think "υ" can be rendered either by "i" or "y".
Also "κ" is of course better rendered by "k".

Thanks for checking it.

Kazbek
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Joined: April 24th, 2019, 12:06 pm

Post by Kazbek » June 16th, 2020, 3:52 pm

Liber wrote:
June 16th, 2020, 3:32 pm
Oops, no, actually that was a mistake, I think it should be

Δέδυκε μὲν ἀ σελάννα [Dèdyke mèn a selànna], Fragment 168 B, by Sappho (c. 630 – c. 570 BC)

I think "υ" can be rendered either by "i" or "y".
Also "κ" is of course better rendered by "k".

Thanks for checking it.
Updated! :)

Michael

laurenlemay
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Post by laurenlemay » June 16th, 2020, 4:06 pm

How do we change 128 kbps in audacity.? Please :)

Kazbek
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Post by Kazbek » June 16th, 2020, 4:08 pm

laurenlemay wrote:
June 16th, 2020, 4:06 pm
How do we change 128 kbps in audacity.? Please :)
Here to help. :) This is done during export to mp3. It's step 6-2 in these instructions:

https://wiki.librivox.org/index.php?title=Audacity_1-2-3

Michael

Liber
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Post by Liber » June 16th, 2020, 11:00 pm

Here's a very important sonnet by Michelangelo Buonarroti, a bit too cerebral, but important because he is talking more about his sculpture than his love for the woman he is addressing (while he compares courting to extracting a form from the marble, chipping away the superfluous :!: ).

I made an error: I read "obbidisca" instead of "ubbidisca", but as the two words have same meaning and use, and they are practically interchangeable, I hope it is OK.

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Non ha l’ottimo artista alcun concetto, di Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475–1564)
Text URL: https://archive.org/details/lerimedimichela00buongoog/page/n321/mode/2up?q=ottimo
Duration: 1:23
MP3 URL: https://librivox.org/uploads/toddhw/msw024_nonhalottimoartista_michelangelo_le_128kb.mp3
Link to author on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michelangelo
Link to work on Wikisource: https://it.wikisource.org/wiki/Rime_(Michelangelo)/151._Non_ha_l%27ottimo_artista_alcun_concetto
Key Words: multilingual, italian, michelangelo, buonarroti, art, sculpture, love, romantic, courtship
——————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————

Thank you for your time.
Liber

Liber
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Post by Liber » June 17th, 2020, 3:47 am

This is a sonnet by a great Italian poet who is not studied much anymore.

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Sogni e favole io fingo, e pure in carte, di Pietro Metastasio (1698–1782)
Text URL: https://archive.org/details/bub_gb_fmHeD3bnGj0C/page/n423/mode/2up
Duration: 1:31
MP3 URL: https://librivox.org/uploads/toddhw/msw024_sogniefavoleiofingo_metastasio_le_128kb.mp3
Link to author on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pietro_Metastasio
Link to work on Wikisource: https://it.wikisource.org/wiki/Sogni_e_favole_io_fingo
Key Words: multilingual, italian, metastasio, art, fiction, dream, self-deception, truth, reality
——————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————

Thank you for your time.
Liber

Kazbek
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Post by Kazbek » June 17th, 2020, 5:08 am

Thank you, Liber! Both sources look PD and I've entered the info into the MW.

We'll need to ask Sonia to create an author page for Metastasio.

Michael

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