Invitation to English Pronunciation Survey

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nakanishi
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Post by nakanishi » May 27th, 2020, 5:04 pm

Dear Peter-san,
Thank you for another exciting comment!
Peter Why wrote:
May 26th, 2020, 6:26 am
It seems to be something to do with rhythm and tone:
Yes! I think your comment is related to what we call "stress shift".
For example, the word
"Japanese" often has the primary stress on the last syllable [JapaNESE] ,
but when we talk about the kind of paper,
"Japanese paper" is often pronounced as [JAPanese PAper].
It naturally occurs because it's hard to pronounce when two primary stresses are placed side by side like [JapaNESE PAper].
Noriko

linny
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Post by linny » May 31st, 2020, 1:12 pm

Nakanishi-sensei,
I use a microphone that is not connected to my computer and then transfer the files via memory card to the computer for editing. Is there a way I could participate? It seems that I may only do so if my microphone is connected directly to the computer. Is that accurate?

Be well and much luck on your research,
Linette
DPL list Mama is in the hospital. Please be patient. I’ll be online when I can. It should only be a couple of days.
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Availle
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Post by Availle » May 31st, 2020, 3:17 pm

That's what I usually do as well. In this case, however, I used my laptop's built-in microphone, and it worked just fine. If there is not too much background noise, I guess it's okay?

Also, now that I think of it, there would have been a possibility to connect my microphone to the laptop via usb cable... Well, too late now.
Cheers, Ava.
Resident witch of LibriVox. "I ain't Nice."

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nakanishi
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Post by nakanishi » May 31st, 2020, 9:40 pm

Dear Linette,
Thanks for your question.
Both internal and external microphones are OK, as long as they allow access to Chrome or Firefox. So, just as Ava kindly suggested, laptop built-in microphone is fine.
Once the recording starts, you will hear automatic playback after each word. Could you hear the playback and see if your voice is recorded successfully, and kindly let me know if it doesn't work?

Dear Ava,
Thanks as always for your warm support :9:
nakanishi wrote:
May 25th, 2020, 4:15 am
Thanks to your kind support (and other media) I got around 200 recordings last week. If I keep up this pace, I will be able to gather enough data by this summer.
Quoted above is the report I posted a week ago. However, I could not get many people involved (though I started also asking people on Facebook communities) last week. It clearly shows how nice and warm the LibriVox friends have been to my research. Starting from this week, some publishers will be involved in this research, so I am hoping that I can keep up the pace of gathering participants.
Thank you all for your kind support.
Noriko

MichaelMaggs
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Post by MichaelMaggs » June 4th, 2020, 6:19 am

I completed this just now, and it was most interesting. Took about 50 minutes to do all three sections. I realised as I went through that I'm not at all consistent in my pronunciation/stress of apparently similar words.

I have one small suggestion. As somebody has already noted in this thread, after a while it's easy to forget to leave a gap before and after the recording. Maybe you could enforce the opening gap by changing the record button to green when you're ready for the person to speak - eg half a second after the button is pressed. There has to be some mouse noise at the end as the speaker moves across to the Stop button. You could reduce that by removing that button entirely, and instead having a single start/stop toggle button.

I'm looking forward to reading your eventual research results!

nakanishi
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Post by nakanishi » June 5th, 2020, 12:31 am

Dear Michael,

Thank you for completing the survey. I think you also received a thank-you message from our survey team.
MichaelMaggs wrote:
June 4th, 2020, 6:19 am
I realised as I went through that I'm not at all consistent in my pronunciation/stress of apparently similar words.
-> Yes, it happens to me, too. As a native speaker of Japanese, I try to talk to international students in Japanese so that they can practice their second language. Most of them understand what I am saying during the lectures, but when they come to my office, their listening ability goes down tremendously. Later on I realized that it was ME who is causing the unintelligibility of the talk; I unconsiously speak differently when I have a friendly conversation in my office. I think this unconsious difference is hard for non-native speakers.
The same thing can be said about the English language. That is why I would like to upload varieties of English accents on the website. I am hoping that English learners can get used to different accents by listening to and comparing the same words.
MichaelMaggs wrote:
June 4th, 2020, 6:19 am
You could reduce that by removing that button entirely, and instead having a single start/stop toggle button.
-> What a nice idea! This will also reduce the number of participants' finger movements. It's only some centimeters of moving the mouse from the "Record" icon to the "Stop" icon, but it means a lot when it's accumulated to 359 words. I will pass your suggestion to the technical support. Thanks for your kind advice.
-> Last week we successfully fixed the indicator problem which Peter kindly suggested.

Dear LibriVox friends,
If you are wondering what this talk is all about, please check the invitation I posted on May 19th. I would appreciate it if you could help me by recording your English accent by visiting one of the links below:
https://noriko-nakanishi.com/survey/index.php?gakuseki_no=B0001
https://noriko-nakanishi.com/survey/index.php?gakuseki_no=B0002
https://noriko-nakanishi.com/survey/index.php?gakuseki_no=B0003

Thanks.

mightyfelix
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Post by mightyfelix » June 5th, 2020, 1:39 pm

Ok, I did mine! It was very interesting. And yes, I had to ask myself several times which of two pronunciations I actually use. Some of them, I fear, are about equal, and it's entirely chance as to which one I chose to use for your survey. :oops: A few of the words I had to smile at, in particular, "mischeivous," which is a personal pet peeve of mine, because everyone I know pronounces it wrong. :roll:

MichaelMaggs
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Post by MichaelMaggs » June 5th, 2020, 2:26 pm

mightyfelix wrote:
June 5th, 2020, 1:39 pm
A few of the words I had to smile at, in particular, "mischeivous," which is a personal pet peeve of mine, because everyone I know pronounces it wrong. :roll:
Ooh, that's interesting! I agree there's only one correct way of saying it, though I'm not sure whether that's the same as yours.

There are already lots of recordings on https://noriko-nakanishi.com/sounds/index.php, and they seem to fall mostly into three categories:

1. People who say MIS-chiv-us (three syllables)
2. People who say mis-CHEEV-i-us (four syllables)
3. People who say mis-CHEE-vus (three syllables).

In the UK I mostly hear 1 and 2, so probably 3 is not that usual in British English.

Of course, 1 is right. :wink:

nakanishi
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Post by nakanishi » June 5th, 2020, 5:41 pm

Dear Devorah and Michael,

Thanks for the exciting discussion!
Back in 1999, the proportion of the people pronouncing "mischeivous" was:

1. MIS-chiv-us (three syllables)
US 67%; UK(all) 65%; UK(younger) 49%
2. mis-CHEEV-i-us (four syllables)
US 11%; UK(all) 15%; UK(younger) 29%
3. mis-CHEE-vus (three syllables)
US 22%; UK(all) 20%; UK(younger) 22%

And Michael proves it in saying
MichaelMaggs wrote:
June 5th, 2020, 2:26 pm
In the UK I mostly hear 1 and 2, so probably 3 is not that usual in British English.
because the UK younger generation (in 1999) favoured #2 over #3, while the overall population in the UK still favoured #3 over #2 at that time.

I just cannot wait to see what the results would be with the people now in 2020, as well as with the people in different parts of the world :)

commonsparrow3
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Post by commonsparrow3 » June 5th, 2020, 8:48 pm

I just did your survey also. As others have mentioned, there are a few words that I pronounce sometimes one way, sometimes another - (Caribbean, as a notable example) - so I just randomly picked one way or the other, trying to decide which was a bit more likely.

mightyfelix
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Post by mightyfelix » June 5th, 2020, 9:32 pm

MichaelMaggs wrote:
June 5th, 2020, 2:26 pm
mightyfelix wrote:
June 5th, 2020, 1:39 pm
A few of the words I had to smile at, in particular, "mischeivous," which is a personal pet peeve of mine, because everyone I know pronounces it wrong. :roll:
Ooh, that's interesting! I agree there's only one correct way of saying it, though I'm not sure whether that's the same as yours.

There are already lots of recordings on https://noriko-nakanishi.com/sounds/index.php, and they seem to fall mostly into three categories:

1. People who say MIS-chiv-us (three syllables)
2. People who say mis-CHEEV-i-us (four syllables)
3. People who say mis-CHEE-vus (three syllables).

In the UK I mostly hear 1 and 2, so probably 3 is not that usual in British English.

Of course, 1 is right. :wink:
Of course 1 is right! :lol: Almost everyone I know, here in the US, uses 2. Drives me crazy. :evil:
nakanishi wrote:
June 5th, 2020, 5:41 pm
Dear Devorah and Michael,

Thanks for the exciting discussion!
Back in 1999, the proportion of the people pronouncing "mischeivous" was:

1. MIS-chiv-us (three syllables)
US 67%; UK(all) 65%; UK(younger) 49%
2. mis-CHEEV-i-us (four syllables)
US 11%; UK(all) 15%; UK(younger) 29%
3. mis-CHEE-vus (three syllables)
US 22%; UK(all) 20%; UK(younger) 22%
I'm guessing that the age breakdown was not available for the US? It's a shame, because I'd almost put money on #2 being preferred by the younger generation here too. Most of the people that I interact with are now in their thirties or younger, and they're the ones I hear using #2. I don't know whether I really hear the older people I know use the word mischeivous at all!

nakanishi
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Post by nakanishi » June 5th, 2020, 9:55 pm

Dear Maria,
Thanks for your kind help.
commonsparrow3 wrote:
June 5th, 2020, 8:48 pm
As others have mentioned, there are a few words that I pronounce sometimes one way, sometimes another - (Caribbean, as a notable example) -
Yes, I will make sure to mention in my thesis that the accent varieties exist not only among regions and generations, but also within the same person. Researchers in the field of sociolinguistics may call it "register" (in the case of the example I indicated above, the differences between the accents used in lecture talks and in friendly conversations), but there is a lot more to it, which I will categorize later on.

I feel very grateful every time the LibriVox friends give me comments about their experience doing the survey. Please do not hesitate to let us know even if you feel like you are saying the same thing as others, so that I know that it's not just an opinion of one person.
commonsparrow3 wrote:
June 5th, 2020, 8:48 pm
so I just randomly picked one way or the other, trying to decide which was a bit more likely.
For the current survey, I asked participants to record only one way to pronounce each word, and sometimes it must be hard to decide which one, especially when different pronunciations are used interchangeably. I am hoping that this interchangeability will be represented by the distributions of the people who chose to pronounce a certain word in a certain way. In other words, rather than asking participants to ask "Out of ten times, how many times would you pronounce this word this way?", I will gather enough data and say "Out of 100 recordings, this word was pronounced this way XX times, and this way YY times".

So your way of randomly picking, but also deciding according to the likeliness of, one way or the other is exactly what I was expecting. Thanks for your kind explanation :thumbs: .

nakanishi
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Post by nakanishi » June 5th, 2020, 10:12 pm

Dear Devorah,
mightyfelix wrote:
June 5th, 2020, 9:32 pm
I'm guessing that the age breakdown was not available for the US?
Yes, you are right. The US data is based on a survey conducted by a Japanese phonetician in collaboration with the UK survey team back then, but unfortunately, there is no publication about her great research. And I am starting to understand how hard it was for her to finish gathering all the data across the US, and then publish the results, especially because English is her second language (like myself).
However, I'm determined to do it.

So, my friends, please please help me!
Here are the links (please choose the one you like; they have the same words in different orders):
https://noriko-nakanishi.com/survey/index.php?gakuseki_no=B0001
https://noriko-nakanishi.com/survey/index.php?gakuseki_no=B0002
https://noriko-nakanishi.com/survey/index.php?gakuseki_no=B0003

MichaelMaggs
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Post by MichaelMaggs » July 8th, 2020, 8:40 am

Hi Noriko-san, thank you for the £5 Amazon voucher. Most unexpected!

My wife would like to help you out, as well. I've sent her the link.

nakanishi
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Post by nakanishi » July 9th, 2020, 7:13 pm

Hello Michaiel-san,

Thank you for inviting your wife to the survey!
Yes, at this time, my budget proposal was approved for 500 British and North American English speakers, and we still have the vouchers left.
Right now I am trying to get approval for offering the same incentives to World English speakers, whose contributions are equally important for my research.

For LibriVox users,

If you have not joined us with your recordings, please visit
https://noriko-nakanishi.com/survey/index.php?gakuseki_no=B0003
(Other links ending with "B0001" and "B0002" are also fine.)

Please enter your email address at the beginning of the survey so that I may contact you about the Thank-you offer later on.

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