Louis Madelin Bibliography (3 Titles) [History]

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LectorRecitator
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Post by LectorRecitator » May 13th, 2020, 8:52 am

LOUIS EMILE MARIE MADELIN (1871–1956)

The French Revolution (1916)

ℹ️ Volume 5 of "The National History Of France"

ℹ️ "There are many readers who will not venture to embark on this labyrinth of works and documents ; my desire is to offer to these as far as possible a summary of all that has been published, in the course of years, on the subject of the Revolution, and to make them acquainted with the conclusions at which my masters and my fellow-workers have arrived. In the Introduction to his Roman History, the worthy Rollin wrote the following words : "I have not concealed the fact that I have made much use of other men's labours. ..." My work is made up of other men's labours, and if its readers find it interesting, I will beg them to consult the bibliographies, all too scanty, placed at the end of each of my chapters, and in justice to ascribe the merit of the book to the excellent collaborators therein named." (Preface)

ℹ️ "The best short history" (Walter Geer, The French Revolution: A Historical Sketch)

https://archive.org/details/cu31924024309704/page/n7/mode/2up

https://archive.org/details/frenchrevolution00made/page/n7

The Victory Of The Marne (1917)

ℹ️ "From the 5th to the 10th September, the destiny of France and probably of the whole of western civilisation was at stake on the plains of the Marne. On a battle field nearly 200 miles in area, barring the way from Paris to Verdun against the most formidable invasion that has ever menaced France, the Nation in arms checked the invasion, and if, during that memorable week she did not completely shatter it, she at all events in some measure brought it to a standstill.

The Battle of the Marne marks one of the most solemn hours that France has ever known, one of the five or six moments when from the brink of the abyss she staked all and won.

It is still much too soon. I think, to attempt to write a history of the Battle of the Marne such as could be written of the Battles of Marengo or Waterloo. It is a good thing, however, that some of us should from now begin to collect, and put together, its main characteristics many of which naturally enough escaped the attention of most of the actors in the drama, confined as they were to their own corner of the battle-field. An eminent historian, our master, has for two years been patiently and conscientiously investigating these points and before long he will be able to reconstruct in detail, as well as in its main lines, the great tournament, the second anniversary of which, we have just been celebrating.

Such is not the object of this little book. I shall merely retrace the salient features of the battle as they stand out clearly to-day (until further notice) if only to hold up to admiration a beautiful piece of French workmanship, neat, clear, logical, in a word, classic, like a tragedy of Corneille or a park designed by Le Notre. It is necessary to make this statement now in order to establish the considerations which follow, for I intend to point out what place the Battle of the Marne will hold henceforth in the history of France rather than attempt a sketch of strategic history."


https://archive.org/details/victoryofmarneth00made/page/n1/mode/2up

https://archive.org/details/victoryofmarneen00made/page/n3/mode/2up

Danton (1921)

https://archive.org/details/dantonlouis00madeuoft/page/n9/mode/2up

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