COMPLETE: Short Nonfiction Collection, Vol. 073 - jo

Solo or group recordings that are finished and fully available for listeners
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Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » March 17th, 2020, 6:01 am

Short Nonfiction Collection Vol. 073

This project is now complete. All audio files can be found on our catalog page here:

https://librivox.org/short-nonfiction-collection-vol-073-by-various/


This collection is dedicated to recordings of short nonfiction works in English which are in the Public Domain (generally meaning that they were published prior to 1924). Nonfiction includes essays and speeches; letters and diaries; biography and history; film, book and music reviews; descriptions of travel, politics and sports; instructional manuals, even a favorite recipe from a public domain cookbook! Your nonfiction recording can be on any topic. Some suggestions for source material can be found here.

Please select and record any short nonfiction piece in the public domain. For clarification of what it means for a work to be "in the public domain," see this section of the LibriVox Wiki: http://wiki.librivox.org/index.php/Copyright_and_Public_Domain. Try to stay with works that run less than 60 minutes. You may read up to 2 selections per volume. There is no need to "sign-up" before recording; as long as the work is clearly in the public domain. Multiple versions are welcome, so don't worry whether someone else has recorded your selection already; we're happy to hear your version too. :)

After 20 recordings are submitted, we will prooflisten, catalog and make them available to the public.

Basic Recording Guide: http://wiki.librivox.org/index.php/Newbie_Guide_to_Recording

1. RECORD:
  • Be sure to set your recording software to: 44100Hz, 16 or 32-bit.
  • At the BEGINNING say: "[Title of Work], by [Author Name]" "This is a Librivox recording. All Librivox recordings are in the public domain. For more information or to volunteer, please visit Librivox.org"
  • At the END, say: "End of [Title], by [Author Name]"
  • If you wish, you may also say: "Read by...your name."
  • Please leave no more than 1 second of silence at the beginning of your recording. Add about 5 seconds of silence at the end of your recording.
2. EDIT and SAVE your file:
  • Need noise-cleaning? See this LibriVox wiki page for a complete guide.
  • Save or export your recording to an mp3 file at 128kbs. The uploader will add the mp.3 to the end of your file name when it uploads. Please use the format shown. Your file name should have this format before you upload it:

    snf073_titleofwork_authorlastname_yourinitials_128kb

    After it is uploaded, it should have this format:
    https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf073_titleofwork_authorlastname_yourinitials_128kb.mp3
  • Keep the file name short! Use just a word or two to identfy the title. Omit "a," "the," etc. Don't put spaces between words. Keep everything lower case. Even your initials should be lower case. The only underscores should be the separations between the snf volume, title, author's last name, and your initials. There are only 4 underscores in a file name!
3. UPLOAD your recording:
  • Upload your finished recording using the LibriVox uploader: http://librivox.org/login/uploader. When your upload is complete, you will receive a link - copy and post it to the current nonfiction thread. If you don't post that you've uploaded your recording, the nonfiction book coordinator won't know that you did it!
    Image
  • If you have trouble reading the image above, please send a private message to any admin.
  • To upload, you'll need to select the MC, which for the Short Nonfiction Collection is: knotyouraveragejo
  • If this doesn't work, or you have questions, please check our How To Send Your Recording wiki page
4. POST the following information in this thread:
  • Title of the work.
  • Author of the work.
  • The link to your file you copied from the uploader.
  • A URL link to the source from which you read (etext URL). NOTE: If posting from Gutenberg, please provide the link to the download page, e.g. http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/# (where # is the Gutenberg project number for the book).
  • Length in minutes.
  • If this is your first Librivox recording, we will also need your name as you would like it to appear in the LibriVox catalog, and, if you have a web page and want it linked to your name in the catalog, the URL of the web page.
5. PROOF LISTENING AND DEADLINE FOR EDITS on recordings you have submitted:
  • We ask that you complete any editing requested by the Dedicated Proof Listener within two weeks of the request, or, if you need more time, that you post in this thread to request an extension. There’s no shame in this; we’re all volunteers and things happen. Extensions are, however, at the discretion of the Book Coordinator. To be fair to the other readers, sections which cannot be edited in a timely manner will be deleted from the current volume of the Nonfiction Collection, but they can always be included in a future volume when the edits are complete.

Magic Window:



BC Admin
Last edited by Sue Anderson on April 12th, 2020, 8:47 am, edited 2 times in total.

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » March 17th, 2020, 6:02 am

Welcome to the 73rd volume of the Short Nonfiction Collection. This is a place to share a special interest by recording a short work of public domain nonfiction. If you haven't something already in mind that you'd like to record, there are many bookshelves at Gutenberg.org to explore http://www.gutenberg.org/wiki/Category:Bookshelf. The bookshelves for Countries, Education, Fine Arts, History, Music, Periodicals, and Technology are some places to start.

Hathi Trust and Archive.org are good resources:

https://archive.org/
https://www.hathitrust.org/

The Online Books Page has over 2 million PD listings! It was suggested by Soupy (Craig), our Dedicated Proof Listener.
http://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/lists.html

The Biodiversity Heritage Library is a great source for natural history. It was suggested by LibriVoxer MillionMoments. http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/

The Linda Hall Science, Engineering, and Technology Library has some unique items in its Digital Collection https://www.lindahall.org/collections/

Sourcing your recording from Wikisource is NOT recommended.

If you have any doubts about the public domain status of anything you want to read for the collection, please feel free to post the source along with your query in the thread, and I will be glad to help you! Thanks!

Please note: There is a limit of two selections per reader for this volume of Short Nonfiction.

Please check the "vitals" of your recording with Checker https://wiki.librivox.org/index.php/Checker before sending it up to the Nonfiction Collection! :) Checker is an easy to use "open source tool that looks for common problems with recordings for LibriVox... Checker saves time by checking contributions for common issues before files are uploaded." Thanks! :) :)

Sue (Book Coordinator, Short Nonfiction Collection)

TriciaG
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Post by TriciaG » March 17th, 2020, 10:01 am

First in!

Title: Some reflections, growing out of the recent epidemic of influenza that afflicted our city: a discourse delivered in the Fifteenth Street Presbyterian Church, Washington, D.C., Sunday, November 3, 1918 (could be shortened!)
Author: Francis J. Grimké (I've made sure he's in the author database)
Text: https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/100657976 (one of a few projects they allow us to download entirely without a partner login!)
Length: 28:27
Link: https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf073_reflectionsoninfluenzaepidemic_grimke_tg_128kb.mp3

P.S. Your red file name example in the first post still says 072. :)
Hatfields & McCoys Sensationalist Account: An American Vendetta
Humor: Maxims of Methuselah about women

Sue Anderson
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Joined: July 24th, 2008, 11:48 am
Location: Midwest, USA
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Post by Sue Anderson » March 17th, 2020, 11:00 am

TriciaG wrote:
March 17th, 2020, 10:01 am
First in!

Title: Some reflections, growing out of the recent epidemic of influenza that afflicted our city: a discourse delivered in the Fifteenth Street Presbyterian Church, Washington, D.C., Sunday, November 3, 1918 (could be shortened!)
Author: Francis J. Grimké (I've made sure he's in the author database)
Text: https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/100657976 (one of a few projects they allow us to download entirely without a partner login!)
Length: 28:27
Link: https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf073_reflectionsoninfluenzaepidemic_grimke_tg_128kb.mp3

P.S. Your red file name example in the first post still says 072. :)
Thanks, Tricia, for these most interesting and relevant reflections on the 1918 flu epidemic! :D One would think they were reading commentary written today:

"Another thing that has impressed me, in connection with this epidemic, is the fact that conditions may arise in a community which justify the extraordinary exercise of powers that would not be tolerated under ordinary circumstances. This extraordinary exercise of power was resorted to by the Commissioners in closing up the theaters, schools, churches, in forbidding all gatherings of any considerable number of people indoors and outdoors, and in restricting the numbers who should be present even at funerals. The ground of the exercise of this extraordinary power was found in the imperative duty of the officials to safeguard, as far as possible, the health of the community by preventing the spread of the disease from which we were suffering." Francis J. Grimké

Thanks for pointing out the 072; this is indeed vol. 073. I'll enter you in the MW as soon as we have one.

soupy
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Post by soupy » March 17th, 2020, 1:05 pm

To murder in cold blood all joy in life for him who has no money is a dreadful thing and that is what the moneyed man does.

Help us finish
The Spirit of the Age.


My Website
Kierkegaards Challenge

Sue Anderson
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Joined: July 24th, 2008, 11:48 am
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Post by Sue Anderson » March 17th, 2020, 5:12 pm

soupy wrote:
March 17th, 2020, 1:05 pm
This one is a little longish.

Soren Kierkegaard in his life and literature by Adolf Hult 1869-1943

108:02

Craig
Thanks, Craig! :) This essay on Kierkegaard sounds intriguing: "Both Socrates and Kierkegaard sought by the subtle pedagogy of philosophic irony to regenerate their respective ages, Kierkegaard, however, in the service of Christianity."


It'll probably take me a couple of days to do the PL, given the length; however, I'm looking forward to hearing what Hult has to say.

soupy
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Post by soupy » March 18th, 2020, 6:05 am

Thanks Tricia :thumbs:

We read. A few minor errors noted.

11:31 I once heard Mr. Tillman from the floor of the Senate say … you said Dr. Tillman
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benjamin_Tillman

27:06 either we have no faith at all, or it is weak - you said whether

Craig
To murder in cold blood all joy in life for him who has no money is a dreadful thing and that is what the moneyed man does.

Help us finish
The Spirit of the Age.


My Website
Kierkegaards Challenge

TriciaG
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 46376
Joined: June 15th, 2008, 10:30 pm
Location: Toronto, ON (but Minnesotan to age 32)

Post by TriciaG » March 18th, 2020, 7:20 am

Corrected file:

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf073_reflectionsoninfluenzaepidemic_grimke_tg_128kb.mp3
Same run time. :)

Tillman sounds like a winner, doesn't he? Just the first paragraph of that Wiki article says everything.
Hatfields & McCoys Sensationalist Account: An American Vendetta
Humor: Maxims of Methuselah about women

soupy
Posts: 3858
Joined: November 14th, 2008, 4:04 pm
Location: Appleton, Wisconsin
Contact:

Post by soupy » March 18th, 2020, 8:36 am

Nice corrections Tricia :D
PLOK :thumbs:

Yes, Mr Tillman was a strange Senator from South Carolina - his brother and nephew were in government too.

Craig
To murder in cold blood all joy in life for him who has no money is a dreadful thing and that is what the moneyed man does.

Help us finish
The Spirit of the Age.


My Website
Kierkegaards Challenge

ktaylor07
Posts: 293
Joined: January 3rd, 2020, 12:33 pm
Location: North Carolina
Contact:

Post by ktaylor07 » March 18th, 2020, 8:48 am

Here are two from me:


“Women Friendships”
From “The Clergyman's Wife, and Other Sketches. A Collection of Pen Portraits and Paintings” (1867)

Anna Cora Mowatt Ritchie (1819-1870)
Text URL: https://archive.org/details/clergymanswifeot00ritcrich/page/310/mode/2up
MP3 URL: https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf073_womanfriends_ritchie_kst_128kb.mp3
Length: 08:00
Read by Kelly S. Taylor

“The Unadmiring”
From “The Clergyman's Wife, and Other Sketches. A Collection of Pen Portraits and Paintings” (1867)

Anna Cora Mowatt Ritchie (1819-1870)
Text URL: https://archive.org/details/clergymanswifeot00ritcrich/page/280/mode/2up
MP3 URL: https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf073_unadmiring_ritchie_kst_128kb.mp3
Length: 11:50
Read by Kelly S. Taylor

Sue Anderson
Posts: 3964
Joined: July 24th, 2008, 11:48 am
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Post by Sue Anderson » March 18th, 2020, 9:10 am

soupy wrote:
March 17th, 2020, 1:05 pm
This one is a little longish.

Soren Kierkegaard in his life and literature by Adolf Hult 1869-1943

108:02

Craig
Hi Craig, Thanks for this stimulating read! :) Hult's was certainly a vivid retelling of Kierkegaard's life and thought. "Original geniuses [such as] Soren Kierkegaard of Denmark, apostle of Christian subjectivity ... when intelligently studied, exercise a fundamentally culturing and deepening influence on one's inmost nature."

There were only a few slips:

9:16, page 4, text reads "His diaries and bescribbled scraps of paper..." You said "besmirched"

34:59, bottom of page 10, "Christian ideas are set forth in the second great period, the religions, where by spiritual addresses..." You added the word "three" (three spiritual addresses)

47:29 page 15, text reads "September 29, 1841" You said September 20, 1841

47:37, page 15, text reads "magister artium" You said "atrium"

soupy
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Post by soupy » March 18th, 2020, 9:38 am

Corrected


https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf073_kierkegaardlife_hult_cc_128kb.mp3

108:01

It's funny that the 1911 British encyclopedia used Brandes's biography about Kierkegaard as their source - but not Waldemart's Swedish biography. I'm glad Hult read and that it got him to read Kierkegaard.

Do you know any Swedes who want to translate his biography?
https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/100432780

Thanks for the PL Sue :thumbs:

Craig
To murder in cold blood all joy in life for him who has no money is a dreadful thing and that is what the moneyed man does.

Help us finish
The Spirit of the Age.


My Website
Kierkegaards Challenge

Sue Anderson
Posts: 3964
Joined: July 24th, 2008, 11:48 am
Location: Midwest, USA
Contact:

Post by Sue Anderson » March 18th, 2020, 9:53 am

ktaylor07 wrote:
March 18th, 2020, 8:48 am
Here are two from me:

“Women Friendships”
From “The Clergyman's Wife, and Other Sketches. A Collection of Pen Portraits and Paintings” (1867)
Anna Cora Mowatt Ritchie (1819-1870)


“The Unadmiring”
From “The Clergyman's Wife, and Other Sketches. A Collection of Pen Portraits and Paintings” (1867)
Anna Cora Mowatt Ritchie (1819-1870)

Read by Kelly S. Taylor
Hi Kelly, Thanks for these additional selections fom Mowatt Ritchie! :) I'm really enjoying them. Mowatt Ritchie is a very perceptive writer! Her description of the "Quenchums" of the world is so "right on!"

"Among social nuisances, defend us from those pitiable beings who, through some deficiency in their mental conformation, some lack of vital heat, of acute sensibility, of quick perception, are totally deprived of the faculty to appreciate and the power to admire." [and, who, by their constant negativism "quench" the joy in life for those around them...]

Sue Anderson
Posts: 3964
Joined: July 24th, 2008, 11:48 am
Location: Midwest, USA
Contact:

Post by Sue Anderson » March 18th, 2020, 10:07 am

soupy wrote:
March 18th, 2020, 9:38 am
Corrected


https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf073_kierkegaardlife_hult_cc_128kb.mp3

108:01

It's funny that the 1911 British encyclopedia used Brandes's biography about Kierkegaard as their source - but not Waldemart's Swedish biography. I'm glad Hult read and that it got him to read Kierkegaard.

Do you know any Swedes who want to translate his biography?
https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/100432780

Thanks for the PL Sue :thumbs:

Craig
Hi Craig, Yes, that paragraph where Hult describes how he discovered Kierkegaard rang a bell with me. How many of us, as individuals, have had a chance encounter with a book that changed our lives? I would think it's a pretty common experience among LibriVoxers:

"Some thirteen years ago I was eyeing the shelves of a book repository when the queer title of an unassuming volume captured my attention. It was Kierkegaard's "The Sickness unto death," in a Swedish translation ..." Adolf Hult (1905)

All PL OK now.

ktaylor07
Posts: 293
Joined: January 3rd, 2020, 12:33 pm
Location: North Carolina
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Post by ktaylor07 » March 18th, 2020, 10:14 am

Sue Anderson wrote:
March 18th, 2020, 9:53 am
ktaylor07 wrote:
March 18th, 2020, 8:48 am
Here are two from me:

“Women Friendships”
From “The Clergyman's Wife, and Other Sketches. A Collection of Pen Portraits and Paintings” (1867)
Anna Cora Mowatt Ritchie (1819-1870)


“The Unadmiring”
From “The Clergyman's Wife, and Other Sketches. A Collection of Pen Portraits and Paintings” (1867)
Anna Cora Mowatt Ritchie (1819-1870)

Read by Kelly S. Taylor
Hi Kelly, Thanks for these additional selections fom Mowatt Ritchie! :) I'm really enjoying them. Mowatt Ritchie is a very perceptive writer! Her description of the "Quenchums" of the world is so "right on!"

"Among social nuisances, defend us from those pitiable beings who, through some deficiency in their mental conformation, some lack of vital heat, of acute sensibility, of quick perception, are totally deprived of the faculty to appreciate and the power to admire." [and, who, by their constant negativism "quench" the joy in life for those around them...]
I really liked that one too. I'm afraid I have a "Quenchum" in my family who's always trying to put a wet blanket over every outing we try to take...

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