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Availle
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Post by Availle » September 4th, 2019, 6:57 am

Little Fuzzy is out - already picked years ago. :D Besides, if I remember correctly, they are declared "persons" or something similar, sentient at least, at the very end.
Cheers,
Ava.

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linny
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Post by linny » September 11th, 2019, 12:26 pm

Lady into Fox had a second version recorded as well. https://librivox.org/lady-into-fox-by-david-garnett-2/

Here's one where a man was swallowed by a crocodile and made himself at home. https://librivox.org/the-crocodile-by-fyodor-dostoyevsky/

Foon
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Post by Foon » September 11th, 2019, 12:45 pm

In terms of our furry friends, I think any of the books by Arthur Scott Bailey would be good: https://librivox.org/author/464
or
Something from the Twilight Animals series by Walsh, the first one is Bumper the White Rabbit: https://librivox.org/bumper-the-white-rabbit-by-george-ethelbert-walsh/
Both are children's book series.
Foon - Real life is getting in the way of LV, will be slow until all is back on track, please bear with me!


Readers needed:
Dramatic Reading: The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
Folklore/legends: Arabian Nights Vol. 11
Play: Zeus the Tragedian

Availle
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Post by Availle » September 11th, 2019, 3:00 pm

Thank you!

Arthur Scott Bailey is always good, just as Burgess.
The Croc story sounds interesting - not at all Dostoyevsky.

I'm not sure about Dr. Doolittle, I think it was already picked a few years back, but then again, we do have sequels too... :D
Cheers,
Ava.

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TriciaG
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Post by TriciaG » September 11th, 2019, 3:11 pm

How about In Search of the Unknown?
https://librivox.org/in-search-of-the-unknown-by-robert-w-chambers/

They are hunts for unusual or thought-extinct animals for the zoo, but some of the stories border on the supernatural or weird. It's half weird, half humorous.
Christmas Lore: LINK
Proofs the Earth Isn't a Globe: LINK
Mystery stories: The Master of Mysteries

Availle
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Post by Availle » September 11th, 2019, 3:16 pm

Excellent! :thumbs:
Cheers,
Ava.

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TriciaG
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Post by TriciaG » September 11th, 2019, 3:53 pm

One more: https://librivox.org/that-pup-by-ellis-parker-butler/

That Pup. It's a cute puppy that grows to be... a big nuisance that the owner cannot get rid of!
Christmas Lore: LINK
Proofs the Earth Isn't a Globe: LINK
Mystery stories: The Master of Mysteries

Foon
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Post by Foon » September 12th, 2019, 4:07 am

If I can shamelessly plug one of my own reads, I find the Natural History of Pliny fascinating. The Boys' and Girls' Pliny is adapted for a younger audience (but still just as interesting for adults), and volume 3 in the series is about Domestic Animals and Fishes. https://librivox.org/the-boys-and-girls-pliny-vol-3-by-pliny-the-elder/
Written almost 2 millenia ago, a lot of the information is either surprisingly accurate, or hilariously outdated!
(alternatively, the same topics from the original Pliny would be just as interesting!)
Foon - Real life is getting in the way of LV, will be slow until all is back on track, please bear with me!


Readers needed:
Dramatic Reading: The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
Folklore/legends: Arabian Nights Vol. 11
Play: Zeus the Tragedian

Kitty
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Post by Kitty » September 12th, 2019, 4:27 am

fresh from the press, catalogued today, just in time for this: viewtopic.php?f=16&t=74831

The Animal Story book is a collection of short stories about different animals throughout different time periods. Not only house pets but also wild animals like snakes or lions. Not sure if that counts. But there are lots of stories about dogs, cats or other housepets. Some stories are adapted from noteworthy authors, like Dumas or Gauthier or even old Pliny.

Sonia

ej400
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Post by ej400 » September 12th, 2019, 5:16 am

I'd suggest books by Thorton W. Burgess, that is, for the children's area :wink:

Availle
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Post by Availle » October 1st, 2019, 5:08 pm

The staff has picked for October, thank you for your many suggestions! Please have a look at this page for the current list. You can also check out our wiki page for a plain vanilla list that contains all the staff picks for this year plus the readers!

The theme for next month is:

Ghosts, ghouls and gremlins

Suitable for Halloween and the foggy nights of November, I'm looking for spooky stuff and horror. Anything goes as long as it's hair-raising... :shock:

Especially welcome are suggestions of plays and poetry.

All languages welcome!

Thanks for your help! :D
Cheers,
Ava.

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Leni
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Post by Leni » October 1st, 2019, 5:21 pm

I'd like to suggest a Portuguese story, translated into English: https://librivox.org/our-lady-of-the-pillar-by-jose-maria-de-eca-de-queiros/
Leni
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Come read about flowers and plants in Pliny's Natural History! :D

Availle
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Post by Availle » October 1st, 2019, 5:36 pm

All languages welcome!

It's a short one - wouldn't you like to read it in the original until the end of the month? :mrgreen:
Cheers,
Ava.

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Leni
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Post by Leni » October 1st, 2019, 5:41 pm

Availle wrote:
October 1st, 2019, 5:36 pm
All languages welcome!

It's a short one - wouldn't you like to read it in the original until the end of the month? :mrgreen:
You know, I actually thought exactly that when I made the suggestion! Not sure I will manage, but I can try. :mrgreen:
Leni
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Come read about flowers and plants in Pliny's Natural History! :D

ToddHW
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Post by ToddHW » October 1st, 2019, 6:40 pm

Howsabout two plays? First, The Castle Spectre by Matthew Lewis? https://librivox.org/the-castle-spectre-by-matthew-lewis/

Written by Gothic writer Matthew Lewis, whose novel The Monk is one of the most enduring Gothic works from the eighteenth century, The Castle Spectre is one of Lewis' earliest forays into drama, and a strong indication of his talents as a controversial and frightening entertainer. Set in medieval Conway, Wales, the play is filled with every delicious Gothic trope imaginable: a menacing castle, a villainous nobleman hiding terrible secrets, a virginal damsel in distress, an heroic lover trying to save her, several comedic supporting characters, and, yes, the presence of a ghost.

Second, The Return of Peter Grimm by David Belasco? https://librivox.org/the-return-of-peter-grimm-by-david-belasco/

"Mr. Belasco has written the following account of "Peter's" evolution: [ ] The play, "The Return of Peter Grimm," is an expression in dramatic form of my ideas on a subject which I have pondered over since boyhood: "Can the dead come back?" Peter Grimm did come back. At the same time, I inserted a note in my program to say that I advanced no positive opinion; that the treatment of the play allowed the audience to believe that it had actually seen Peter, or that he had not been seen but existed merely in the minds of the characters on the stage. Spiritualists from all over the country flocked to see "The Return of Peter Grimm," and I have heard that it gave comfort to many. It was a difficult theme, and more than once I was tempted to give it up. But since it has given relief to those who have loved and lost, it was not written in vain."

Thanks, Todd

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