FULL [PLAY] A Woman is a Weathercock by Nathan Field-mas

Plays and other dramatic works
Post Reply
RobMarland
Posts: 1457
Joined: February 25th, 2013, 2:25 am
Location: Switzerland

Post by RobMarland » March 16th, 2019, 4:28 am

bhavya wrote:
March 16th, 2019, 4:13 am
Hello,

Can I claim narrator?
Of course! Thanks.
Rob Marland reader section | website
A Woman Is a Weathercock by Nathan Field. A bawdy Jacobean comedy.
The Dial. British aesthetic magazine, 1889.
The Remarkable Rocket by Oscar Wilde. Dramatic reading.

aaronwhite1977
Posts: 181
Joined: October 4th, 2018, 12:15 pm
Location: Indianapolis, IN
Contact:

Post by aaronwhite1977 » March 16th, 2019, 11:31 am


RobMarland
Posts: 1457
Joined: February 25th, 2013, 2:25 am
Location: Switzerland

Post by RobMarland » March 17th, 2019, 7:15 am

Thanks, Aaron. This is great. I have marked all as PL OK. However, I would be much obliged if you re-uploaded Act 2 with a second take of your first line: "Young Scudmore." I assumed that this was an old form of the modern name, Scudamore, and so should be pronounced 'Scood-more'. I put pronunciation instructions elsewhere, but failed to do so with your line. Because other characters immediately say the name after Pendant does, I think it's best to be consistent so it doesn't sound like they are correcting you.
Rob Marland reader section | website
A Woman Is a Weathercock by Nathan Field. A bawdy Jacobean comedy.
The Dial. British aesthetic magazine, 1889.
The Remarkable Rocket by Oscar Wilde. Dramatic reading.

aaronwhite1977
Posts: 181
Joined: October 4th, 2018, 12:15 pm
Location: Indianapolis, IN
Contact:

Post by aaronwhite1977 » March 17th, 2019, 12:09 pm

RobMarland wrote:
March 17th, 2019, 7:15 am
Thanks, Aaron. This is great. I have marked all as PL OK. However, I would be much obliged if you re-uploaded Act 2 with a second take of your first line: "Young Scudmore." I assumed that this was an old form of the modern name, Scudamore, and so should be pronounced 'Scood-more'. I put pronunciation instructions elsewhere, but failed to do so with your line. Because other characters immediately say the name after Pendant does, I think it's best to be consistent so it doesn't sound like they are correcting you.
Of course. The first time I read the play all the way through I downloaded for the site to my kindle app, so I didn’t see your notes. Then I went through my lines on your oh so handy guide, but I missed seeing the pronunciation tip. I’ll get it re recorded tomorrow.


aaronwhite1977
Posts: 181
Joined: October 4th, 2018, 12:15 pm
Location: Indianapolis, IN
Contact:

Post by aaronwhite1977 » March 18th, 2019, 11:36 am

I have uploaded a corrected file under the same name.

https://librivox.org/uploads/maryannspiegel/weathercock_pendant_2.mp3

Thanks!
Aaron

Foon
Posts: 2860
Joined: May 10th, 2018, 2:33 pm

Post by Foon » March 18th, 2019, 11:55 am

Hi Rob,
Just checking if you saw this post, since I don't see the files in the MW. :)
Foon - Real life is getting in the way of LV, will be slow until all is back on track, please bear with me!


Readers needed:
Dramatic Reading: The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
Folklore/legends: Arabian Nights Vol. 11
Play: Zeus the Tragedian

RobMarland
Posts: 1457
Joined: February 25th, 2013, 2:25 am
Location: Switzerland

Post by RobMarland » March 18th, 2019, 2:58 pm

Foon wrote:
March 18th, 2019, 11:55 am
Hi Rob,
Just checking if you saw this post, since I don't see the files in the MW. :)
Sorry about that. Thanks for the heads up.
Rob Marland reader section | website
A Woman Is a Weathercock by Nathan Field. A bawdy Jacobean comedy.
The Dial. British aesthetic magazine, 1889.
The Remarkable Rocket by Oscar Wilde. Dramatic reading.

RobMarland
Posts: 1457
Joined: February 25th, 2013, 2:25 am
Location: Switzerland

Post by RobMarland » March 18th, 2019, 3:12 pm

OK, Foon, these are great. I was worried that asking for slurring would mean the words would be difficult to make out, but this is a really good balance.

One thing, since you request pronunciation notes. In act 3, in the line "'Tis pestilence sack and cruel claret", I would expect 'claret' to be 'klarut' https://www.google.com/search?q=claret Would you mind re-reading that?
Rob Marland reader section | website
A Woman Is a Weathercock by Nathan Field. A bawdy Jacobean comedy.
The Dial. British aesthetic magazine, 1889.
The Remarkable Rocket by Oscar Wilde. Dramatic reading.

Foon
Posts: 2860
Joined: May 10th, 2018, 2:33 pm

Post by Foon » March 18th, 2019, 3:15 pm

RobMarland wrote:
March 18th, 2019, 3:12 pm
OK, Foon, these are great. I was worried that asking for slurring would mean the words would be difficult to make out, but this is a really good balance.

One thing, since you request pronunciation notes. In act 3, in the line "'Tis pestilence sack and cruel claret", I would expect 'claret' to be 'klarut' https://www.google.com/search?q=claret Would you mind re-reading that?
Absolutely, will do!
Foon - Real life is getting in the way of LV, will be slow until all is back on track, please bear with me!


Readers needed:
Dramatic Reading: The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
Folklore/legends: Arabian Nights Vol. 11
Play: Zeus the Tragedian

bhavya
Posts: 998
Joined: May 4th, 2018, 1:46 am
Location: St Andrews, Scotland

Post by bhavya » March 19th, 2019, 5:22 am

Hello Rob,

Am I supposed to read the dramatis personnae?
If so,
Do I say "Scudmore. Read by: "?

Thanks,
Bhavya

Kitty
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 19873
Joined: March 28th, 2014, 5:57 am

Post by Kitty » March 19th, 2019, 5:26 am

RobMarland wrote:
March 18th, 2019, 11:29 am
Here are my files for Nevill.
excellent job, Rob. You play him quite soft-spoken which I think gives even a better effect to his plot than if he was more exuberant. I like the interpretation of his character. Perfectly played out. :thumbs:

Acts 1, 3 and 4 are already PL ok.

For 2 and 5 I found a few OMNES lines, where I think Nevill may take part too. Unless there was a reason why you excluded him :hmm:

for Act 2:

> at 3:38: 'Tis young Scudmore! – I think Nevill as the priest should not be included in this ALL line. He is probably not supposed to know Scudmore and anyway, he already knows that he is there, so wouldn’t be surprised to see him

> at about 33:46: there are however two more ALL lines, where we could probably include your voice
- OMNES. How!
- OMNES. But hear ye.

for Act 5:

> at about 1:00: OMNES. O, there he is.

> at about 2:55:
- OMNES. How?
- OMNES. How?
- OMNES. Young Strange!

I let you decide whether you want to include them.

Sonia

RobMarland
Posts: 1457
Joined: February 25th, 2013, 2:25 am
Location: Switzerland

Post by RobMarland » March 19th, 2019, 6:03 am

Thanks, Sonia. For the Omnes lines, I just selected a few people to read them because any more than three voices and it can become difficult to understand what’s being said. If I end up with not enough versions of a line, I’ll add more in the end.
Rob Marland reader section | website
A Woman Is a Weathercock by Nathan Field. A bawdy Jacobean comedy.
The Dial. British aesthetic magazine, 1889.
The Remarkable Rocket by Oscar Wilde. Dramatic reading.

RobMarland
Posts: 1457
Joined: February 25th, 2013, 2:25 am
Location: Switzerland

Post by RobMarland » March 19th, 2019, 6:06 am

bhavya wrote:
March 19th, 2019, 5:22 am
Hello Rob,

Am I supposed to read the dramatis personnae?
If so,
Do I say "Scudmore. Read by: "?

Thanks,
Bhavya
Yes please, Bhavya. The dramatis personae will be a separate file. Normally, each person reads their own character name, but it is useful to have the narrator read them too in case we need them. There is no need to say “read by” though: just the names.
Rob Marland reader section | website
A Woman Is a Weathercock by Nathan Field. A bawdy Jacobean comedy.
The Dial. British aesthetic magazine, 1889.
The Remarkable Rocket by Oscar Wilde. Dramatic reading.

Kitty
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 19873
Joined: March 28th, 2014, 5:57 am

Post by Kitty » March 19th, 2019, 6:12 am

RobMarland wrote:
March 19th, 2019, 6:03 am
Thanks, Sonia. For the Omnes lines, I just selected a few people to read them because any more than three voices and it can become difficult to understand what’s being said. If I end up with not enough versions of a line, I’ll add more in the end.
ok, makes sense. Then they are all PL ok.

Sonia

Post Reply