Play Suggestions

Plays and other dramatic works
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alanmapstone
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Post by alanmapstone » March 8th, 2019, 11:20 pm

As the play by Terence proved so popular can I suggest that another Terence play would be equally popular. Eunuchus looks interesting but it does include scenes of "ravishing" (i.e. rape) and buying and selling of female slaves which some may find too offensive. The summary at the beginning also suggests an incestuous marriage but that may be a misprint.

We would of course be relying on Todd and Sonia (our heroes) to do the hard work as usual. :clap:
alan
the sixth age shifts into the slippered pantaloon with spectacles on nose

ToddHW
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Post by ToddHW » March 9th, 2019, 3:57 am

I have another Terence - The Fair Andrian - all prep’d but waiting until end of March so as to support the Cleanup month. (I have a buncha my own recording to do - plus still editing all the other plays where parts are still coming in.)

Thanks, Todd

alanmapstone
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Post by alanmapstone » March 9th, 2019, 4:13 am

ToddHW wrote:
March 9th, 2019, 3:57 am
I have another Terence - The Fair Andrian - all prep’d but waiting until end of March so as to support the Cleanup month.
That is great news. Thanks!
alan
the sixth age shifts into the slippered pantaloon with spectacles on nose

mightyfelix
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Post by mightyfelix » March 9th, 2019, 12:48 pm

I found a reference to another play in a book I'm recording now:

The Fair Penitent: A Tragedy
by Nicholas Rowe
https://archive.org/details/bub_gb_QVG62ZNJ94UC

Five male and three female roles, and possibly some smaller servant speaking roles. I haven't read through it.

RobMarland
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Post by RobMarland » March 11th, 2019, 6:11 am

Hi all,

A quick heads up to let you know I've just posted A Woman is a Weathercock, the first play by the author of Amends for Ladies, which we just finished.

viewtopic.php?f=28&t=74227&p=1566893
Rob Marland reader section | website
A Woman Is a Weathercock by Nathan Field. A bawdy Jacobean comedy.
The Dial. British aesthetic magazine, 1889.
The Remarkable Rocket by Oscar Wilde. Dramatic reading.

Peter Why
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Post by Peter Why » March 31st, 2019, 10:35 am

I'm definitely not able to judge the quality of this, but W.S. Gilbert (1836-1911) wrote a comic play about Rosencrantz and Guildenstern:

Wikipedia entry about the play is here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosencrantz_and_Guildenstern_(play)

The play is available in the collection of Gilbert stories called "Fogerty's Fairy and other tales": https://archive.org/details/00189951.2023.emory.edu/page/n1

Peter
"I think, therefore I am, I think." Solomon Cohen, in Terry Pratchett's Dodger

ToddHW
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Post by ToddHW » April 1st, 2019, 3:23 pm

Peter Why wrote:
March 31st, 2019, 10:35 am
I'm definitely not able to judge the quality of this, but W.S. Gilbert (1836-1911) wrote a comic play about Rosencrantz and Guildenstern:

Wikipedia entry about the play is here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosencrantz_and_Guildenstern_(play)

The play is available in the collection of Gilbert stories called "Fogerty's Fairy and other tales": https://archive.org/details/00189951.2023.emory.edu/page/n1

Peter
This looks fun. But given its briefness (only 17 pages), it might better be done in the current One Act Play collection even if it is labeled as being 3 acts. I might put it there.

Maybe I will also offer the rest of it as a book to be read here. Stay tuned.

Thanks, Todd

Elizabby
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Post by Elizabby » April 1st, 2019, 4:41 pm

ToddHW wrote:
April 1st, 2019, 3:23 pm
This looks fun. But given its briefness (only 17 pages), it might better be done in the current One Act Play collection even if it is labeled as being 3 acts. I might put it there.
I agree - I've just read it and all 3 "acts" really should have been called "scenes" as they barely add up to one Act between them!

elsieselwyn
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Post by elsieselwyn » April 2nd, 2019, 6:54 pm

I haven't read through them, but I found two 3 act plays. One is called "The unattainable; a farce in three acts" and the other is "Rain; a play in three acts". They might be fun to do. They both just came into the public domain since they were published in 1923.

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=inu.32000009120603;view=1up;seq=111

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.31210000814606;view=1up;seq=19

Edit: I think that Rain was actually suggested earlier. The unattainable is written by the same playwright.

Timothy Ferguson
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Post by Timothy Ferguson » April 3rd, 2019, 7:14 am

I'm a bit of a Lord Dunsany fan, so I was really happy to find a three-actor play here (http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/16435/pg16435.html) where he revisits his short story about Fame and a Poet from "The Food of Death". Basically, there's a poet who worships fame, and does all of the lofty arty stuff, and when she turns up, she's coarse and horrible and wrecks his sheltered life.
My occasional blog is Games from Folktales

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Post by ToddHW » April 4th, 2019, 11:03 am

soupy wrote:
March 6th, 2019, 11:59 am
I posted a play in Book suggestions and found I can post it here too.

[PLAY] The Wonder-Working Magician by Pedro Calderón de la Barca 1637

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pedro_Calder%C3%B3n_de_la_Barca

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/6372


The second drama in this volume, "The Wonderful Magician", is perhaps better known to poetical students in England than even the first, from the spirited fragment Shelley has left us in his "Scenes from Calderon." The preoccupation of a subject by a great master throws immense difficulties in the way of any one who ventures to follow in the same path: but as Shelley allowed himself great licence in his versification, and either from carelessness or an imperfect knowledge of Spanish is occasionally unfaithful to the meaning of his author, it may be hoped in my own version that strict fidelity both as to the form as well as substance of the original may be some compensation for the absence of those higher poetical harmonies to which many of my readers will have been accustomed.

"El Magico Prodigioso" appeared for the first time in the same volume as "La Vida es Sueno", prepared for publication in 1635 by Don Joseph Calderon. The translation is comprised in the same number of lines as the original, and all the preceding remarks on "Life is a Dream", whether in reference to the period of the first publication of the drama in Spain, or the principles I kept in view while attempting this version may be applied to it. As in the Case of "Life is a Dream", "The Wonderful Magician" has previously been translated entire by an English writer, ("Justina", by J.H. 1848); but as Archbishop Trench truly observes, "the writer did not possess that command of the resources of the English language, which none more than Calderon requires."
This looks interesting. I might give it a try later this month.

Thanks, Todd

mightyfelix
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Post by mightyfelix » April 5th, 2019, 8:05 am

Timothy Ferguson wrote:
April 3rd, 2019, 7:14 am
I'm a bit of a Lord Dunsany fan, so I was really happy to find a three-actor play here (http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/16435/pg16435.html) where he revisits his short story about Fame and a Poet from "The Food of Death". Basically, there's a poet who worships fame, and does all of the lofty arty stuff, and when she turns up, she's coarse and horrible and wrecks his sheltered life.
This would be ideal for the one act play collection. Anyone is free to start up and run their own one act as part of that collection. If you'd like to try your hand at coordinating a short play like this one, that's the best place to do it. You'll have lots of support.

Or, if you prefer, you can wait and see if someone else will pick this one up. It's quite fun, so someone may before too long.

KIBBONAFIDE
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Post by KIBBONAFIDE » April 5th, 2019, 10:16 am

Looks like this collection of One-Acts was just recently released on Gutenberg:

https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/59210

I was seriously considering doing “Express!” from this collection...maybe in time for the current one act collection. Basically a two person play (a third role, a guard has a couple lines, it seems.) I have a friend in mind I’d like to bring into the LibriVox fold and this might be a great piece to do that with and it looks like it’s not in the catalog.

A lot of great stuff here, though, it looks like!
Last edited by KIBBONAFIDE on April 5th, 2019, 10:28 am, edited 1 time in total.
Josh Kibbey

KIBBONAFIDE
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Post by KIBBONAFIDE » April 5th, 2019, 10:21 am

While I’m here:

Two One-Acts in this collection released on Gutenberg today:

https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/59203
Josh Kibbey

elsieselwyn
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Post by elsieselwyn » April 15th, 2019, 2:22 pm

I posted this in book suggestions, but thought I would post it here as well. Plautus was an ancient Roman playwright who wrote satirical and comedic plays. I compiled some collections of his works translated into English.

The Comedies of Plautus, literally translated into English by Henry Thomas Riley

Volume 1: https://archive.org/details/comediesofplautu01plauiala/page/n4
Volume 2: https://archive.org/details/comediesofplautu02plauiala/page/n15

Plautus, translated into English by Paul Nixon

Volume 1 seems to be missing. I could not find it on archive, hathitrust, or gutenberg.
Volume 2: https://archive.org/details/plautusvolume00plaugoog/page/n6
Volume 3: https://archive.org/details/plautuswithengli03plauuoft/page/n8
Volume 4: https://archive.org/details/in.ernet.dli.2015.189102
Volume 5: https://archive.org/details/plautuswithengli05plauuoft/page/n6

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