COMPLETE: Short Nonfiction Collection, Vol. 058 - jo

Solo or group recordings that are finished and fully available for listeners
Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » July 7th, 2018, 5:18 pm

soupy wrote:
July 7th, 2018, 4:12 pm
Thanks for the content from Chesterton. I have one question and that is the pronunciation of the word contentment. See the note on page one. Its fine if you disagree.

Craig
Craig and Phil, I just now downloaded and listened to Phil's recording. At 5:35, the text reads "True contentment is a thing as active as agriculture." And that is what Phil says. I did not find any errors in Phil's reading. I think we should mark it PL OK.

pschempf
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Post by pschempf » July 7th, 2018, 6:12 pm

Craig and Sue -

I haven't a clue what that line is supposed to mean, but I think contentment with the accent on the second syllable is the correct one. Towards the beginning of this, Chesterton says, "Some distinguish these by stressing different syllables." I found that somewhat surprising. Here I thought the words had different pronunciations depending on the intent. I must be out of the loop. :roll:
Fritz

"A small daily task, if it be really daily, will beat the labors of a spasmodic Hercules."

Trollope

soupy
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Post by soupy » July 7th, 2018, 6:27 pm

I took it to be that he was going through the content of pudding and not even appreciating it.
True contentment is a thing as active as agriculture. It is the power of getting out of any situation all that there is in it. It is arduous and it is rare. The absence of this digestive talent is what makes so cold and incredible the tales of so many people who say they have been “through” things; when it is evident that they have come out on the other side quite unchanged. A man might have gone “through” a plum pudding as a bullet might go through a plum pudding; it depends on the size of the pudding—and the man. But the awful and sacred question is “Has the pudding been through him?” Has he tasted, appreciated, and absorbed the solid pudding, with its three dimensions and its three thousand tastes and smells? Can he offer himself to the eyes of men as one who has cubically conquered and contained a pudding?
So my thought was accent on the firs syllable.

Craig

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » July 7th, 2018, 7:49 pm

Oh my. Thank you both, Phil and Craig! Chesterton is now PL OK.

mightyfelix
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Post by mightyfelix » July 7th, 2018, 9:00 pm

I ran across this great article I'd like to read in The Electrical Experimenter, May 1918. https://archive.org/details/electricalex619181919gern

It's called "A Tight Squeeze For Uncle George", and it's very funny. The author relates how he "almost" invented the greatest special effects apparatus for stage plays ever known. It begins on page 39.

(I know we don't need to pre-claim here, but I'm not able to record it just now, and by posting here, I know I'll be able to find it later.)

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » July 8th, 2018, 4:04 am

mightyfelix wrote:
July 7th, 2018, 9:00 pm
I ran across this great article I'd like to read in The Electrical Experimenter, May 1918. https://archive.org/details/electricalex619181919gern

It's called "A Tight Squeeze For Uncle George", and it's very funny. The author relates how he "almost" invented the greatest special effects apparatus for stage plays ever known. It begins on page 39.

(I know we don't need to pre-claim here, but I'm not able to record it just now, and by posting here, I know I'll be able to find it later.)
Hi Devorah, Your "Tight Squeeze" will be welcome when you find time to record. :) The Electrical Experimenter is a fascinating period magazine circa 1918. I started reading some of the advertisements--the magazine is a mine field of health claims for electrical gadgetry; vials of radium for sale through the mail, etc.-- and I had a hard time stopping. Whether old-time advertisements are "nonfiction" or not--that's a topic better not addressed perhaps (?), but some of them would make reads in and of themselves.

mightyfelix
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Post by mightyfelix » July 8th, 2018, 4:39 am

Sue Anderson wrote:
July 8th, 2018, 4:04 am
I started reading some of the advertisements--the magazine is a mine field of health claims for electrical gadgetry; vials of radium for sale through the mail, etc.-- and I had a hard time stopping. Whether old-time advertisements are "nonfiction" or not--that's a topic better not addressed perhaps (?), but some of them would make reads in and of themselves.
I actually submitted an advertisement for Strongfortism to the current "Health and Fitness" Coffee Break Collection! :lol:

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » July 8th, 2018, 7:15 am

mightyfelix wrote:
July 8th, 2018, 4:39 am
Sue Anderson wrote:
July 8th, 2018, 4:04 am
I started reading some of the advertisements--the magazine is a mine field of health claims for electrical gadgetry; vials of radium for sale through the mail, etc.-- and I had a hard time stopping. Whether old-time advertisements are "nonfiction" or not--that's a topic better not addressed perhaps (?), but some of them would make reads in and of themselves.
I actually submitted an advertisement for Strongfortism to the current "Health and Fitness" Coffee Break Collection! :lol:
A great choice! :thumbs: Strongfortism, p. 55. featuring a photo of what passed for a "hulk" in those days and promising body building miracles: "No need for you to be listless, dull and logy; no reason for you to feel languid, indolent and always out of sorts.."

I also liked the ad for the International Correspondence Schools on p. 53, entitled "I Got the Job!":"When (the boss) found I had been studying at home with the International Correspondence Schools he knew I had the right stuff in me--that I was bound to make good. Now we can move over to that house on Oakland Avenue and you can have a maid and take things easy." Both these ads are from the May 1918 issue.

Roger
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Post by Roger » July 10th, 2018, 9:55 am

"Natural Man" by Arthur B. Moss pub. 1884.

Link to online text:
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/43728

Link to recording:
https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf058_naturalman_moss_rm_128kb.mp3

Length: 38:37

Thanks! :)
-- Roger .... pushing on the door of life marked "pull"

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » July 10th, 2018, 10:29 am

Roger wrote:
July 10th, 2018, 9:55 am
"Natural Man" by Arthur B. Moss pub. 1884.

Thanks! :)
Hi Roger, Thank you for contributing to Vol. 58! :) I found a short bio of Arthur Moss (1855-1937) in a book by Edward Royale, Popular Freethought in Britain, 1866-1915 https://books.google.com/books?id=xMhRAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA707&dq=arthur+b.+moss&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjl9raJg5XcAhVCiqwKHWv0BfQ4ChDoAQhHMAY#v=onepage&q=arthur%20b.%20moss&f=false

"Moss was a devout Christian until the age of sixteen, when after a dispute with an elder brother, he read Paine's Age of Reason...This was in 1874, when Bradlaugh was beginning the great revival in Secularism. Moss commenced lecturing in South London, out of doors and then indoors, as he was to continue to do for the next thirty-six years."

soupy
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Post by soupy » July 10th, 2018, 2:43 pm

Thanks for the interesting reading of Moss and his book. You did a great job reading. I only found two errors that should be corrected.

19:54 Vanini was an Atheist. For their heresies Telesio and Oampanella were imprisoned
should be Campanella

32:42 One Stephenson is worth a thousand theologians; one Edison of more value to the world than all the gods that men's imagination have ever pictured. You said goods

Craig

Roger
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Post by Roger » July 11th, 2018, 7:06 am

Good research job, Sue. Thanks for the link and the info on Moss.

Also thanks for the fast PL turnaround, and for locating the errors, soupy.
Hopefully they have now been corrected, and the file has been re-uploaded, ready for a spot PL at your leisure.

Thanks again! :)
-- Roger .... pushing on the door of life marked "pull"

soupy
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Post by soupy » July 11th, 2018, 7:14 am

Good job on corrections Roger :D
PLOK :thumbs:

mightyfelix
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Post by mightyfelix » July 11th, 2018, 1:21 pm

Here it is! This one was a lot of fun! :D

"A Tight Squeeze for Uncle George" by Thomas Reed
https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf058_tightsqueezeunclegeorge_reed_da_128kb.mp3
https://archive.org/details/electricalex619181919gern (Begins on page 39.)
18:16

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » July 11th, 2018, 1:36 pm

mightyfelix wrote:
July 11th, 2018, 1:21 pm
Here it is! This one was a lot of fun! :D

"A Tight Squeeze for Uncle George" by Thomas Reed
Thank you, Devorah! :)

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