A question re "low-demand"/scarce languages

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GrownupDaria
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Joined: April 7th, 2018, 6:44 am

Post by GrownupDaria » April 24th, 2018, 4:38 pm

Hi,

For languages with few recordings on LV (and unfortunately, probably few listeners :( ) are there Language Coordinators? Or maybe a "super-volunteer" (like a "super-user" in tech forums ha ha) who knows what books are on the "waiting for reading" shelf, knows about copyright law etc.?
Specifically, I'm interested in Hebrew. I found only one reader, but I don't have the privileges to send PMs.

Best,

Daria
"When eating an elephant, take one bite at a time."

annise
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Post by annise » April 24th, 2018, 5:02 pm

No there's not. Everyone here is a volunteer and unless someone volunteers ......
The problem with all non USA based languages is finding books that are PD in the USA , even things written 1000's of years ago may not be automatically and Project Gutenberg which we rely on for doubtful cases can only check editions published in the USA

But we have to stick to the somewhat unusual copyright rules of the USA which means published 1922 or earlier , with exceptions those cleared by PG.

Anne

Cori
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Post by Cori » April 30th, 2018, 11:27 am

We can generally give a few pointers about 'probable' copyright, though most of us are not lawyers, and even those who are, are not rendering a legal opinion in any way. :D Happy to help as best we can. Just ask!

I'd also make the argument that 'low-demand' often means 'high value to the listeners who DO come across it', because they're often much less likely to be well-represented by other free (or even paid) audio sources. Perhaps not so bad if you live in the country where the language is predominant ... but if you live elsewhere in the world, it may be harder to access. So, well worth going for, even if the listener numbers will never match even the 19th version of Pride and Prejudice in English. :lol:
There's honestly no such thing as a stupid question -- but I'm afraid I can't rule out giving a stupid answer : : To Posterity and Beyond!

GrownupDaria
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Post by GrownupDaria » May 10th, 2018, 12:06 pm

:lol:
Being a law stydent myself, I checked the Israel Copyright Law and with the help of a REAL lawyer who specializes in copyright, came up with the following answer:
There is copyright as long as the "producer/artist" lives + 70 years. Since I'm interested in old translations to Hebrew, what I've learned is that the producer/artist is the translator (not the author), no matter who ownes the rights themselves. Therefore, if a book was translated be someone who then paeesd away before 1948 - it should be free of rights and thus eligible for recording/reproduction .
So, if, for example, I would like to locate a copy of Thomas Mayne Reid Mayne Reid's "The Headless Horseman" :roll: (published in 1866/8), with the publisher probably out of business, and the translator's name appearing either as initials or as a pseudonim, it means that I'd have to dig and locate the translator, right?
PG is of little help here since if a book on PG has been recently translated, that translation would still be protected by copyright. On the other hand, it means that a book published originally in, say, 1925, then translated to Hebrew and the translator being diseased since 1945 - even the Hebrew translation is not eligible for recording because it does not meet the US copyright laws requirements? Did I get it right?

Any suggestions? :hmm:
"When eating an elephant, take one bite at a time."

annise
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Post by annise » May 10th, 2018, 2:27 pm

I'm afraid so. LV has to operate under USA law because that is where the files are stored .

Anne

moniaqua
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Post by moniaqua » May 11th, 2018, 12:42 am

GrownupDaria wrote:
May 10th, 2018, 12:06 pm
On the other hand, it means that a book published originally in, say, 1925, then translated to Hebrew and the translator being diseased since 1945 - even the Hebrew translation is not eligible for recording because it does not meet the US copyright laws requirements? Did I get it right?
But, in that case, you still could ask at legamus.eu, as this organization is operated in an live+70 country.

GrownupDaria
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Joined: April 7th, 2018, 6:44 am

Post by GrownupDaria » May 17th, 2018, 3:31 pm

moniaqua wrote:
May 11th, 2018, 12:42 am

But, in that case, you still could ask at legamus.eu, as this organization is operated in an live+70 country.
Wow, thank you, Monica! I was unaware of this website.
It seems that they might know the answer because Israel inherited its laws from the British Mandate, so the Israeli law should be similar to the law in the UK.
"When eating an elephant, take one bite at a time."

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