COMPLETE: Short Nonfiction Collection, Vol. 057 - jo

Solo or group recordings that are finished and fully available for listeners
adr6090
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Post by adr6090 » May 13th, 2018, 3:43 pm

Hell Sue,
I spent a bit of time researching public domain websites yesterday, though the link you had mentioned is not one that I recall seeing. I will look into that perhaps tomorrow or at least by the end of this week. I also plan on recording and posting the story I had mentioned from Bartleby's by the end of this week.

I think it is a shame to waste my Krakatoa recording, same as you. If I upload it to Archive.org is it a process similar to uploading materials on LV?
I will not be reading any of Hopkins work from the journal so please do read whichever you choose & rest assured that I am okay with that.
:D

Sue Anderson wrote:
May 13th, 2018, 12:49 pm
adr6090 wrote:
May 13th, 2018, 11:06 am
Sue,
I found an item that I would like to record for this thread. I am hoping you can let me know if indeed it is an item that will work so I am posting the link below. Please do let me know, at your convenience. Thank you.
http://www.bartleby.com/380/prose/131.html
Hi April,

Glad to see you back, and also glad we can be sure what you've chosen this time is in the Public Domain! :) Yes, Alden's "An Unnecessary Invention" is ok to read. You can read it from Bartleby. I've also found an actual public domain source on archive. org, which is the source I'll use for the LibriVox catalog. https://archive.org/details/domesticexplosiv00alde, p. 146 ff. Interestingly, Alden's book of humorous essays (originally from the NY Times, according to the preface) went by several titles, The Comic Liar just being one of them. The title of the 1877 copy of the book in archive. org is titled "Domestic Explosives and Other Sixth Column Fancies!"

Your Krakatoa read it still on my mind. It's a shame to waste it; perhaps you could upload to archive.org? If you still don't think you want to read Hopkins' sunset descriptions in the journal Nature yourself, would you mind if I read one of them? I'm interested in painting, and his description of the sunset colors is most painterly!
April6090

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Post by Availle » May 13th, 2018, 7:49 pm

Sue, here's the Tesla recording I have promised:

Can Radio Ignite Balloons—The Opinions of Nikola Tesla and Other Radio Experts.
By Nikola Tesla (long quote) or maybe Gernsback, Hugo 1884-1967 (editor)

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf057_radioigniteballoons_tesla_ava_128kb.mp3
length: 17:47

text link: https://archive.org/details/electricalexperi07gern
pages 516, 591-594

(Craig, I suggest PLing from the google doc Tricia has provided for this - just cut and pasted the relevant pages - it's section 15:
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1i4bAsxDZ7f618zMI8ZwAHoPuMgq1vDOZ)
Cheers,
Ava.

--
AvailleAudio.com

Inspired by LibriVox: The 8 Views of Lake Biwa

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » May 14th, 2018, 4:09 am

Availle wrote:
May 13th, 2018, 7:49 pm
Sue, here's the Tesla recording I have promised:

Can Radio Ignite Balloons—The Opinions of Nikola Tesla and Other Radio Experts.
By Nikola Tesla (long quote) or maybe Gernsback, Hugo 1884-1967 (editor)
Thanks, Ava! :) I must say that old science magazines are fascinating. I opened up your source magazine, Electrical Experimenter to the May, 1919 edition and find an article by E. T. Brondsdon entitled "Will Man Freeze the Earth to Death?"

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Post by soupy » May 14th, 2018, 7:36 am

Can Radio Ignite Balloons is PLOK :thumbs:

Thanks Availle.

Craig

The ELECTRICAL EXPERIMENTER is published on the 15th of each month, subscription price is $2.00 a year.
"He that maketh haste to be rich shall not be innocent." --PROVERBS 28:20.
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Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » May 15th, 2018, 11:03 am

The Krakatoa Sunsets, Observations by Gerard Manley Hopkins
from the journal Nature, January 3, 1884

by Gerard Manley Hopkins

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf057_krakatoa_hopkins_sa_128kb.mp3
16:15

Source: http://archive.org/stream/nature2918831884lock#page/222/mode/2up

Given the news about Hawaii's Kilauea, this description of the vivid sunsets seen worldwide in the aftermath of Krakatoa's erruption in 1883 caught my fancy. And yesterday evening seemed the inspirational time to record, given a roiling sky and an approaching thunderstorm (which you can hear in a few places in the recording). Mr. Piazzi Smyth, whose analysis Hopkins scorns, was the astronomer royal of Scotland from 1846 to 1888. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Piazzi_Smyth

Craig, Hopkins' letter to the journal begins at the bottom of p. 222, after the sentence "We have received the following further communications on this subject:--"

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Post by soupy » May 15th, 2018, 3:02 pm

The Krakatoa Sunsets, Observations by Gerard Manley Hopkins is PLOK :thumbs:

He made me think of the controversy between the pure and impute sunsets by Dorgan.

Craig
"He that maketh haste to be rich shall not be innocent." --PROVERBS 28:20.
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adr6090
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Post by adr6090 » May 16th, 2018, 11:22 am

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/38955/38955-h/38955-h.htm#Black_Walnut

Hello,
Can the above be recorded for this thread?
April6090

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Post by Sue Anderson » May 16th, 2018, 12:00 pm

adr6090 wrote:
May 16th, 2018, 11:22 am
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/38955/38955-h/38955-h.htm#Black_Walnut

Hello,
Can the above be recorded for this thread?
The Prairie Farmer, 1884 is fine! :)

adr6090
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Post by adr6090 » May 16th, 2018, 12:02 pm

Thank you. :D
Sue Anderson wrote:
May 16th, 2018, 12:00 pm
adr6090 wrote:
May 16th, 2018, 11:22 am
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/38955/38955-h/38955-h.htm#Black_Walnut

Hello,
Can the above be recorded for this thread?
The Prairie Farmer, 1884 is fine! :)
April6090

adr6090
Posts: 983
Joined: May 31st, 2016, 11:05 am
Location: Cottonwood, California

Post by adr6090 » May 16th, 2018, 3:14 pm

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf057_blkwlnt_weir_adr_128kb.mp3 time 4:50
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/38955/38955-h/38955-h.htm#Black_Walnut

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf057_progress_brown_adr_128kb.mp3 time 4:31
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/38955/38955-h/38955-h.htm#Progress

Here are 2 separate additions for this thread. My question for you is about the 2nd recording above, Progress. I did not see the author as in the first one. I did mention a gentleman that was speaking with someone else though that name was not given. Please do let me know if that was okay.
Thank you,
April6090
April6090

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » May 16th, 2018, 3:50 pm

adr6090 wrote:
May 16th, 2018, 3:14 pm


Here are 2 separate additions for this thread. My question for you is about the 2nd recording above, Progress. I did not see the author as in the first one. I did mention a gentleman that was speaking with someone else though that name was not given. Please do let me know if that was okay.
Thank you,
April6090
Hi April, Thanks for the Black Walnut, and Progress! :) To answer your question about the Progress essay, it's ok by me to leave the actual recording the way you read it, with the attribution to "Professor Brown." But if you would be so kind, would you change the author in your file from "Brown" to "Anonymous," and re-upload the file?

My reasoning here is that "Professor Brown" is, in the essay, being referred to by an anonymous author in a more-or-less apocryphal sense; indeed there might have been a real professor by that last name, but we don't actually know that. Also, Professor Brown's story is not given in his own words, but those words "remembered" by the anonymous author.

Thanks,

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Post by soupy » May 16th, 2018, 6:39 pm

The Black Walnut is well read and :thumbs: PLOK

Thanks April :D

A walnut grove thoroughly cultivated the first ten years will grow at least twenty feet high, while one not cultivated at all would only grow two to three feet in that time.

Progress is also PLOK :thumbs:

Time erases all things except science.

Craig
"He that maketh haste to be rich shall not be innocent." --PROVERBS 28:20.
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Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » May 16th, 2018, 6:51 pm

soupy wrote:
May 16th, 2018, 6:39 pm
The Black Walnut is well read and :thumbs: PLOK

Thanks April :D

A walnut grove thoroughly cultivated the first ten years will grow at least twenty feet high, while one not cultivated at all would only grow two to three feet in that time.

Time erases all things except science.

Craig
The Wier family of Lacon, Illinois, of which D.B. Wier, the author of "The Black Walnut," was a member were an enterprising and interesting group.

I had to research a little on the internet to find info on D.B. Wier for the catalog and found this:
https://marshall.illinoisgenweb.org/histories/1976hopewell.htm , page 38

The Old Cider House:

One of the first settlers to acquire land around Lacon was John Wier who came in 1832. He took title to land in 1833 which is still in the family. He built a log cabin above the present hone of the Ralph Wier family. It over-looked the river. An old mulberry tree still stands by where the cabin stood.

The only remaining building is the cider house built in 1848 by John Wier and his sons, Henry and Dan. It stands behind the present barns and remains sound, built of hardwood lumber and foot-wide pine siding. Oak and walnut are in the beams and sheeting. It is a two-story building with a basement room for storage. It is entirely insulated with a brick lining. The soft red bricks were made from the clay pits on the farm and supplied many nearby farmers. The best known building remaining made from Wier brick is the Budd building, corner of 5th and Main Street, Lacon, which was constructed by Henry Wier for vinegar storage.

The cider house was the processing plant for the surrounding area when vinegar was a necessity for food and cleansing everything from kitchenware to human bodies. At one time 600 acres southeast of Lacon were in apple orchards planted by John, Dan and Henry Wier. There were seven cider presses made with 16" X 16" oak beams, 24 feet long. A wood-fired steam engine drove a line shaft with well greased hard maple blocks for bearings. It turned the presses and various other equipment. Large cisterns provided water for steam when the streams went dry in the fall.

The building is still a picturesque sight though acid vinegar put cider pressing out of business. The cooperage in Lacon supplied barrels for the vinegar which was shipped by boat down the Illinois River for cities in southern and eastern United States.


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Post by soupy » May 16th, 2018, 6:58 pm

Thanks Sue :)

That was good background information.

That family made a big impact
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adr6090
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Post by adr6090 » May 17th, 2018, 11:38 am

Sue,
Love the information that you searched out and posted. :clap:

Craig,
Thank you for the pl okay for the Black Walnut audio.

You know that I heard this morning on the radio that today is "Walnut Day" so I suppose the reading could not have been made at a more appropriate time.
I also feel pleased that my recording seemed to have been quite pleasing to the both of you! Wonderful comments from you both.


Sue Anderson wrote:
May 16th, 2018, 6:51 pm
soupy wrote:
May 16th, 2018, 6:39 pm
The Black Walnut is well read and :thumbs: PLOK

Thanks April :D

A walnut grove thoroughly cultivated the first ten years will grow at least twenty feet high, while one not cultivated at all would only grow two to three feet in that time.

Time erases all things except science.

Craig
The Wier family of Lacon, Illinois, of which D.B. Wier, the author of "The Black Walnut," was a member were an enterprising and interesting group.

I had to research a little on the internet to find info on D.B. Wier for the catalog and found this:
https://marshall.illinoisgenweb.org/histories/1976hopewell.htm , page 38

The Old Cider House:

One of the first settlers to acquire land around Lacon was John Wier who came in 1832. He took title to land in 1833 which is still in the family. He built a log cabin above the present hone of the Ralph Wier family. It over-looked the river. An old mulberry tree still stands by where the cabin stood.

The only remaining building is the cider house built in 1848 by John Wier and his sons, Henry and Dan. It stands behind the present barns and remains sound, built of hardwood lumber and foot-wide pine siding. Oak and walnut are in the beams and sheeting. It is a two-story building with a basement room for storage. It is entirely insulated with a brick lining. The soft red bricks were made from the clay pits on the farm and supplied many nearby farmers. The best known building remaining made from Wier brick is the Budd building, corner of 5th and Main Street, Lacon, which was constructed by Henry Wier for vinegar storage.

The cider house was the processing plant for the surrounding area when vinegar was a necessity for food and cleansing everything from kitchenware to human bodies. At one time 600 acres southeast of Lacon were in apple orchards planted by John, Dan and Henry Wier. There were seven cider presses made with 16" X 16" oak beams, 24 feet long. A wood-fired steam engine drove a line shaft with well greased hard maple blocks for bearings. It turned the presses and various other equipment. Large cisterns provided water for steam when the streams went dry in the fall.

The building is still a picturesque sight though acid vinegar put cider pressing out of business. The cooperage in Lacon supplied barrels for the vinegar which was shipped by boat down the Illinois River for cities in southern and eastern United States.

April6090

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