COMPLETE: Short Nonfiction Collection, Vol. 52 - jo

Solo or group recordings that are finished and fully available for listeners
Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » September 30th, 2017, 5:45 pm

soupy wrote:Here is one more short piece by me.

Christ and Socrates

Jean-Jacques Rousseau 1712-1778

https://archive.org/stream/worldsbestessays10brew#page/3283/mode/1up

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf052_christandsocrates_rousseau_cc_128kb.mp3

5:47

Craig
Hi Craig, Thank you for your contribution! :) It is PL OK.

soupy
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Post by soupy » September 30th, 2017, 6:01 pm

Thanks Sue.

I hope my voice sounded okay.

Rousseau was quite the writer.

Craig
"He that maketh haste to be rich shall not be innocent." --PROVERBS 28:20.
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msfry
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Post by msfry » October 3rd, 2017, 3:52 pm

The True Story Of Lady Byron’s Life, in three parts.
An article published in the Atlantic in 1869.
By Harriet Beecher Stowe
TEXT: https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/1869/09/the-true-story-of-lady-byrons-life/305445/

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf052_ladybyronslife1_hbstowe_mtf_128kb.mp3 26:26
https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf052_ladybyronslife2_hbstowe_mtf_128kb.mp3 34:56
https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf052_ladybyronslife3_hbstowe_mtf_128kb.mp3 27:19

Countess Guiccioli's book, The Life of Lord Byron In Italy, claimed many falsehoods about Lady Byron and overlooked or glorified Lord Byron's many bad habits. Stowe wrote this article to counteract that book and defend her friend. Atlantic lost 15,000 subscribers in the months following publication of this article due to Lord Byron's extreme popularity, and the perception that Harriet was just being a religious prude and a tattle tale . . . . or maybe because it mentioned the taboo subjects of incest, infidelity, and bi-sexuality. This backlash led Harriet to write a full length book in 1870 entitled Lady Byron Vindicated, the Story of the Byron Controversy, which I plan to post as a solo at some point.

I could have fit the article into two parts time wise, but the subject matter broke better into 3. Use wherever you think it fits best, so long as they stay together in one volume (of course).
Michele Fry, CC
My Projects
"When you change the way you look at things, things you look at change."
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Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » October 3rd, 2017, 5:49 pm

Sue Anderson wrote:
Hi mlee, Welcome to the nonfiction collection! :) Could you please do me a favor and post the title of your selection, the author's name, and the source from which you read? I'll need those things for proof listening and cataloging. Many thanks,

Sue

PM, 9/13/17

Edit: October 3, 2017 In my capacity as book coordinator, I am postponing inclusion of this selection in the nonfiction collection until we have the necessary information about the source from which it was read. The pm sent on 9/13/2017 has not been opened. This selection will be welcome in a future volume, once we have the required information.

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » October 3rd, 2017, 5:53 pm

msfry wrote:The True Story Of Lady Byron’s Life, in three parts.
An article published in the Atlantic in 1869.
By Harriet Beecher Stowe
TEXT: https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/1869/09/the-true-story-of-lady-byrons-life/305445/

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf052_ladybyronslife1_hbstowe_mtf_128kb.mp3 26:26
https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf052_ladybyronslife2_hbstowe_mtf_128kb.mp3 34:56
https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf052_ladybyronslife3_hbstowe_mtf_128kb.mp3 27:19

Countess Guiccioli's book, The Life of Lord Byron In Italy, claimed many falsehoods about Lady Byron and overlooked or glorified Lord Byron's many bad habits. Stowe wrote this article to counteract that book and defend her friend. Atlantic lost 15,000 subscribers in the months following publication of this article due to Lord Byron's extreme popularity, and the perception that Harriet was just being a religious prude and a tattle tale . . . . or maybe because it mentioned the taboo subjects of incest, infidelity, and bi-sexuality. This backlash led Harriet to write a full length book in 1870 entitled Lady Byron Vindicated, the Story of the Byron Controversy, which I plan to post as a solo at some point.

I could have fit the article into two parts time wise, but the subject matter broke better into 3. Use wherever you think it fits best, so long as they stay together in one volume (of course).
Hi Michele, You're all set with 3 sections in this volume. I'll start PLing them tomorrow. Your topic looks most interesting, and I am looking forward to the listen! :)

Regards,

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » October 4th, 2017, 11:13 am

msfry wrote:The True Story Of Lady Byron’s Life, in three parts.
An article published in the Atlantic in 1869.
By Harriet Beecher Stowe
Countess Guiccioli's book, The Life of Lord Byron In Italy, claimed many falsehoods about Lady Byron and overlooked or glorified Lord Byron's many bad habits. Stowe wrote this article to counteract that book and defend her friend. Atlantic lost 15,000 subscribers in the months following publication of this article due to Lord Byron's extreme popularity, and the perception that Harriet was just being a religious prude and a tattle tale . . . . or maybe because it mentioned the taboo subjects of incest, infidelity, and bi-sexuality. This backlash led Harriet to write a full length book in 1870 entitled Lady Byron Vindicated, the Story of the Byron Controversy, which I plan to post as a solo at some point.

I could have fit the article into two parts time wise, but the subject matter broke better into 3. Use wherever you think it fits best, so long as they stay together in one volume (of course).
Hi Michele,

My goodness, I can see why this article in The Atlantic created such a sensation in 1869! I had never read anything by H.Beecher Stowe, so I didn't know she was such a spirited writer! Also, I most certainly had never given any thought to Lord Byron, not to his poetry nor to his "Woody Allen" lifestyle. The poetry, at least from the lines Beecher Stowe quotes, is self-serving in a way that would make today's women cringe.

"His fame, too, for he had that kind of fame
Which sometimes plays the deuce with womankind,
A heterogeneous mass of glorious blame,
Half virtues and whole vices being combined;
Faults which attract because they are not tame;
Follies tricked out so brightly that they blind;

"And then he had good looks; that point was carried
Nem. con. amongst the women, . . . .
Now though we know of old that looks deceive,
And always have done somehow, these good looks
Make more impression than the best of books.

Yuck... I wonder how Byron would have fared in the hands of Ellen Pao.

PL, OK! :)

msfry
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Post by msfry » October 4th, 2017, 11:51 am

Harriet Beecher Stowe is well represented in the LV catalog, with 2 versions of Uncle Tom's Cabin, which of course, needs no introduction. 9 of her 30+ books have been recorded here, 5 of them coordinated and/or read by me! She was a very prolific author, full of astute observations, local color and expanded heart. And every book is historical, including the fiction. I love reading her.
Michele Fry, CC
My Projects
"When you change the way you look at things, things you look at change."
.

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » October 4th, 2017, 12:32 pm

Thanks, Michele, now I just need to listen to the books!

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » October 6th, 2017, 11:04 am

Volume 52 is now closed! Many thanks to all who contributed to this diverse nonfiction collection!

Look for Volume 53 in "Readers Wanted: Short Works (Poetry and Prose)

Best wishes from your book coordinator,

knotyouraveragejo
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Post by knotyouraveragejo » October 7th, 2017, 2:07 pm

Congratulations! This collection is now in the LibriVox catalog and available for listeners to download. Please check the catalog page and let me know if any changes are needed:

https://librivox.org/short-nonfiction-collection-vol-052-by-various/
Jo
My Librivox Solos
Books are the carriers of civilization. Without books, history is silent, literature dumb, science crippled, thought and speculation at a standstill. - Barbara Tuchman

msfry
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Post by msfry » October 7th, 2017, 2:19 pm

Thanks, Sue and Jo. I look forward to listening to them all. :D
Michele Fry, CC
My Projects
"When you change the way you look at things, things you look at change."
.

soupy
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Post by soupy » October 7th, 2017, 2:22 pm

I don't see any text links.

Craig
"He that maketh haste to be rich shall not be innocent." --PROVERBS 28:20.
Open Projects
A General View of Positivism by Comte 1 section left

Anton Tchekhov: and other essays by Lev Shestov

My Website
Kierkegaards Challenge

knotyouraveragejo
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 14022
Joined: November 18th, 2006, 4:37 pm
Location: Pennsylvania

Post by knotyouraveragejo » October 7th, 2017, 2:45 pm

Fixed.
Jo
My Librivox Solos
Books are the carriers of civilization. Without books, history is silent, literature dumb, science crippled, thought and speculation at a standstill. - Barbara Tuchman

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