COMPLETE: Short Nonfiction Collection, Vol. 52 - jo

Solo or group recordings that are finished and fully available for listeners
pschempf
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Post by pschempf » September 25th, 2017, 8:52 pm

Sue-

A bit of Canadian history from an Englishman's point of view-

John Johnston, of Sault Ste. Marie, A Passage in Canadian History by William Kingsford (1819-1898)

MP3 link: https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf052_johnjohnston_kingsford_ps_128kb.mp3
Source: https://books.google.com/books?id=XYHhAAAAMAAJ&source=gbs_similarbooks
Length: 28:51

Wikipedia has info on Kingsford if he isn't in the catalog-
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Kingsford
Last edited by pschempf on September 26th, 2017, 8:19 am, edited 1 time in total.
Fritz

"A small daily task, if it be really daily, will beat the labors of a spasmodic Hercules."

Trollope

Lynnet
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Post by Lynnet » September 26th, 2017, 7:11 am

Help us finish:

The Chinese Kitten 7 sections remaining
Passages from the Life of a Philosopher by Charles Babbage 33 sections remaining

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » September 26th, 2017, 9:39 am

Thanks Fritz and Lynne for these contributions! New authors for the catalog, both of them! :) I'll proof listen in a bit.

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » September 26th, 2017, 10:58 am

pschempf wrote:Sue-

A bit of Canadian history from an Englishman's point of view-

John Johnston, of Sault Ste. Marie, A Passage in Canadian History by William Kingsford (1819-1898)

MP3 link: https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf052_johnjohnston_kingsford_ps_128kb.mp3
Source: https://books.google.com/books?id=XYHhAAAAMAAJ&source=gbs_similarbooks
Length: 28:51

Wikipedia has info on Kingsford if he isn't in the catalog-
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Kingsford
Thanks, Fritz, for this contribution, which throws light on the tangled history surrounding the Sault Ste. Marie area. As always, you read very well! :) Your reading gained added interest for me, when I opened up Google maps, to "follow the action" so to speak, and saw the location of Sault Ste. Marie--just across the Canadian border from the upper Peninsula of Michigan. There are some Michigan Lake Superior beaches, reputedly good for agate hunting, which I have imagined as a vacation destination (Gran Marais, etc.); it sounds like there would be a lot of history to explore in the area also.

PL OK.

pschempf
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Post by pschempf » September 26th, 2017, 11:25 am

Sue-

I grew up in Minnesota and worked for several years in Michigan. This is the season to visit the shores of the upper Great Lakes, no bugs and the fall colors can be spectacular if your timing is right. We used to keep an eye out for agates when we walked gravel roads or prowled around gravel pits, but these days those roads are all paved and gravel pit owners aren't as welcoming as they were when I was a kid. Best one we found was about the size of a baseball, but most were a lot smaller, more grape to walnut sized. :)
Fritz

"A small daily task, if it be really daily, will beat the labors of a spasmodic Hercules."

Trollope

msfry
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Post by msfry » September 26th, 2017, 12:00 pm

I would like to reserve 2 sections together for the following work:
The True Story Of Lady Byron’s Life, in two parts. Each section about 40 minutes long. It might take a week or two to be completed so if it doesn't make it into this collection, then the next one will be fine. I just want you to know it's coming. :D
Michele Fry, CC
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Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » September 26th, 2017, 12:05 pm

Lynnet wrote:Here is Books for Tired Eyes by Arthur E. Bostwick (1860-1942)

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/13430

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf052_booksfortiredeyes_bostwick_lt_128kb.mp3

(24:34)

Lynne
Hi Lynne, This essay by a librarian on the eyestrain imposed by small type made a lot of good points. Our generation is lucky to have the ability to enlarge type on our computers to a readable size, something that Bostwick's generation simply could not do. Speaking personally, another miracle of our age is the magnifying "reader," machines such as (to put in a plug) the Optolec Clearview which I bought for a sight-impaired relative of mine. The joy this magnifier brought to that person's life, allowing them to read books again, was truly marvelous for me to witness.

One of my own gripes about type is the faint gray type that is popular now. Since archive.org redesigned their webpage and started using this tiny, faint gray type, I can hardly, if at all, make out how many downloads my LibriVox recordings have received! Just as well?

PL OK. :)

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » September 26th, 2017, 12:15 pm

msfry wrote:I would like to reserve 2 sections together for the following work:
The True Story Of Lady Byron’s Life, in two parts. Each section about 40 minutes long. It might take a week or two to be completed so if it doesn't make it into this collection, then the next one will be fine. I just want you to know it's coming. :D
Hi Michele, Lady Byron sounds interesting! Depending on when you finish, there will definitely be a place for your readings, either in this, or the next volume! :)

Best wishes,

msfry
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Post by msfry » September 26th, 2017, 12:23 pm

Sue Anderson wrote:One of my own gripes about type is the faint gray type that is popular now. Since archive.org redesigned their webpage and started using this tiny, faint gray type, I can hardly, if at all, make out how many downloads my LibriVox recordings have received! Just as well?
Yes, what's up with that faint gray type! And another gripe of mine is the back of CD and Audiobook cases. They put all the descriptive text in about 8 point type in the middle of the 5x5 page, with 2 inches of blank space all around it! Who is making these ridiculous choices? Ah, I bet it's people who can see! :?
Michele Fry, CC
My Projects
"Knowing that a tomato is actually a fruit is Knowledge. Wisdom is not putting one in a fruit salad."
.

Lynnet
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Post by Lynnet » September 26th, 2017, 12:53 pm

Sue Anderson wrote:
Lynnet wrote:Here is Books for Tired Eyes by Arthur E. Bostwick (1860-1942)

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/13430

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf052_booksfortiredeyes_bostwick_lt_128kb.mp3

(24:34)

Lynne
Hi Lynne, This essay by a librarian on the eyestrain imposed by small type made a lot of good points. Our generation is lucky to have the ability to enlarge type on our computers to a readable size, something that Bostwick's generation simply could not do. Speaking personally, another miracle of our age is the magnifying "reader," machines such as (to put in a plug) the Optolec Clearview which I bought for a sight-impaired relative of mine. The joy this magnifier brought to that person's life, allowing them to read books again, was truly marvelous for me to witness.

One of my own gripes about type is the faint gray type that is popular now. Since archive.org redesigned their webpage and started using this tiny, faint gray type, I can hardly, if at all, make out how many downloads my LibriVox recordings have received! Just as well?

PL OK. :)
And, of course, Librivox can only do so much :lol: :lol:
Help us finish:

The Chinese Kitten 7 sections remaining
Passages from the Life of a Philosopher by Charles Babbage 33 sections remaining

MaryAnnSpiegel
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Post by MaryAnnSpiegel » September 27th, 2017, 5:50 pm

Sue Anderson wrote:
MaryAnnSpiegel wrote:Sue,

This caught my eye:

Poetry for Poetry's Sake by A. C. Bradley

The link to your file you copied from the uploader. https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf052_poetry_bradley_mas_128kb.mp3
Source from which you read (etext URL). http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/24308
Length in minutes. 50.49

MaryAnn
Wow... A.C. Bradley's lecture, which I gather was given on the occasion of his ascendence to the position of "professor of poetry" at Oxford was as technical a read as I've had occasion to proof listen in a long time. MaryAnn, you did a fine job with this difficult text! :) I'm only going to point out one small slip, and that only in the spirit of Bradley's remark that "in true poetry it is, in strictness, impossible to express the meaning in any but its own words, or to change the words without changing the meaning." The slip occurred right at the end at 49:20:50... Leading up to this point, Bradley writes: "About the best poetry, and not only the best, there floats an atmosphere of infinite suggestion. The poet speaks to us of one thing, but in this one thing, there seems to lurk the secret of all... Those who are susceptible to this effect of poetry find it... in a child's song by Christina Rossetti about a mere crown of wind-flowers..." Well, you read "wild flowers," which is probably what I would have read myself; but, I think you would agree with me that it's the unexpected image of "wind flowers" that touches the poetic imagination here.

Regards,
Thanks Sue. Corrected file uploaded.
MaryAnn

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » September 27th, 2017, 6:50 pm

Thanks, MaryAnn! :)

VfkaBT
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Post by VfkaBT » September 29th, 2017, 1:22 pm

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf052_eatinginberlin_cobb_vfkabt_128kb.mp3
3.13
https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf052_emergencyfeature_weymouthgazette_vfkabt_128kb.mp3
4.12

A pair of short works from the Weymouth Gazette (Massachusetts) of July 3rd, 1914. Found this on Archive last night.
https://archive.org/stream/WeymouthGazette191407/Weymouth_Gazette_1914_07#page/n0/mode/2up
Emergency Feature is on the front page; the Cobb piece is on the following pages on the right-hand side up top.
My previous LV work: Bellona Times

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » September 29th, 2017, 6:08 pm

VfkaBT wrote:https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf052_eatinginberlin_cobb_vfkabt_128kb.mp3
3.13
https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf052_emergencyfeature_weymouthgazette_vfkabt_128kb.mp3
4.12

A pair of short works from the Weymouth Gazette (Massachusetts) of July 3rd, 1914. Found this on Archive last night.
https://archive.org/stream/WeymouthGazette191407/Weymouth_Gazette_1914_07#page/n0/mode/2up
Emergency Feature is on the front page; the Cobb piece is on the following pages on the right-hand side up top.
Thanks BT, Both are PL OK. Interesting to read about a forerunner of the 911 emergency telephone number! :)

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Post by soupy » September 30th, 2017, 4:28 pm

"He that maketh haste to be rich shall not be innocent." --PROVERBS 28:20.
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