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Post Posted:: June 21st, 2017, 12:42 pm 
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First World War Centenary Prose Collection Vol. III.

Quote:
On July 28, 2014, the LibriVox community commemorated the 100th anniversary of the start of the First World War with collections of poetry and prose. This is the third volume of the prose collection.

Same guidelines apply as with volumes I and II:
  • All prose pieces, in any language, are welcome, provided that they specifically relate to the First World War. If their duration is longer than 70 minutes, please submit them in two parts.
  • Readers are welcome to submit as many items as they would like (within reason, of course).
  • Please do not record items already recorded in the first volume or the second volume for this volume.
  • To avoid duplicate recordings in this collection, please post what you intend to read and I'll add your claim to the Magic Window. If you change your mind later on, just let me know.
  • Please provide a short (2-5 line) summary of each item you submit. I will include them in a PDF to be cataloged with the recording, as Ruth did with the prior collections.

Some suggestions for readings are in the following post.

  1. NEW READERS: Please read the Newbie Guide to Recording and do a short test recording before submitting here, just to make sure that all your settings are OK. Then please read this post carefully and refer back to it. It has all the information you need to submit a recording successfully.

  2. Is there a deadline? This collection will be catalogued when 50 items have been submitted, or in about 6 months if it goes slowly. It's all very flexible.

    Magic Window:



    BC Admin

    Genre for the project: *Non-fiction/War & Military
    Keywords that describe the book: WWI, First World War, World War One, remembrance

  3. BEFORE recording: Please check the Recording Notes: http://librivox.org/forum/viewtopic.php?p=6427#6430

    Set your recording software to:
    Channels: 1 (Mono)
    Bit Rate: 128 kbps
    Sample Rate: 44.1 kHz

  4. DURING recording:
    No more than 0.5 to 1 second of silence at the beginning of the recording!
    Make sure you add this to the beginning of your recording:
    START of recording (Intro)
    • "[Title of Work], by [Author Name]. This is a LibriVox recording. All LibriVox recordings are in the public domain. For more information, or to volunteer, please visit: librivox DOT org"

      OR if you are reading in another language, please feel free to say the disclaimer in that language. You can find them on this page in the Wiki.


  5. END of recording
    • At the end of the section, say:
      "End of [Title of Work], by [Author Name]"
    • If you wish, say:
      "Read by [your name]"

    There should be 5 seconds silence at the end of the recording.

    Please remember to check this thread frequently for updates!

  6. AFTER recording
    Need noise-cleaning?
    Listen to your file through headphones. If you can hear some constant background noise (hiss/buzz), you may want to clean it up a bit. The new (free) version 1.3.3. of Audacity has much improved noise-cleaning. See this LibriVox wiki page for a complete guide.

    Save files as 128 kbps MP3 (all lower-case, with no leading articles) wwi3_[titleinafewwords]_[author]_[yourinitials]_128kb.mp3
    (e.g. wwi3_offtothefront_floyd_rg_128kb.mp3)

  7. Transfer of files (completed recordings) Please always post in this forum thread when you've sent a file. Also, post the length of the recording (file duration: mm:ss) together with the link.
    • Upload your file with the LibriVox Uploader:
      https://librivox.org/login/uploader
      Image
      (If you have trouble reading the image above, please message an admin)
    • You'll need to select the MC, which for this project is: maryannspiegel
    • When your upload is complete, you will receive a link - please post it in this thread.
    • If this doesn't work, or you have questions, please check our How To Send Your Recording wiki page.

  8. Any questions?
    Please post below

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Post Posted:: June 21st, 2017, 12:42 pm 
LibriVox Admin Team

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Suggestions for reading (or a chapter or two from them). All additional suggestions (in any language) will be warmly welcomed.

GERMAN:
Interesting list of German texts (thanks, HP!)
http://de.wikisource.org/wiki/Erster_Weltkrieg

ENGLISH:

Not PD for readers in Europe:

Birds and the War by Hugh Steuart Gladstone (b. 1877 - 1949)
https://archive.org/details/birdsandwarglads00gladrich
[commonsparrow3 recorded Birds as Messengers for volume 2]

Waiting for Daylight by H. M. Tomlinson (1873 – 1958)
https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/27246

The Enormous Room by E. E. Cummings (1894-1962). More info here: viewtopic.php?p=1175589#p1175589
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/8446

The War Book of the German General Staff, being the Usages of War on Land
Prussia (Kingdom). Armee. Grosser Generalstab. Kriegsgeschichtliche Abteilung II;
Translated by J. H. Morgan (John Hartman) (1876-1955)
https://archive.org/details/cu31924005230564

The Dispatch-Riders: The Story of Two British Motor-Cyclists in the Great War by Percy F. (Percy Francis) Westerman (1876-1959) and Frank Gillett (1874-1927)
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/36500

The Amateur Army by Patrick MacGill (1889-1963)
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/16078

The Soul of a Nation (Armistice Day 1920) by Sir Phillip Gibbs (1877-1962) [recorded for vol. 2]
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/41308

Russia in Literature
https://archive.org/stream/currenthistoryfo01newyuoft#page/818/mode/2up
An open letter signed by a few dozen famous English authors (Barrie, Doyle, Wells, etc) on the eve of WWI 1914, addressed to the great writers of Russia.

Off to the Front from At Ypres with Best-Dunkley. [An account of the 2/5th Lancashire Fusiliers under the command of Colonel Best-Dunkley.] by Thomas Hope Floyd (1896-1973). Chapter I Off to the Front would be particularly welcome. Not PD for Canada or Australia either.
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/17813 Peter (mrwemmick) will read The City and The Trenches and The Battle of Ypres for Vol. 3.

Somme Battle Stories by Capt. A. J. Dawson (1872-1951)
has stand-alone chapters which would be suitable, including The Australian as a Fighter, and A Cool Canadian. https://archive.org/details/cihm_87758 David Wales has recorded Chap. 5 for Vol. I. and has now recorded the whole book as a solo

Letters from a Young Queenslander by Dr. Robert Marshall Allan (1886-1946)
A collection of letters and extracts written by a military physician from South Brisbane practising in France during WWI.
https://archive.org/details/LettersFromAYoungQueenslander
Selection recorded by Elizabby for volume 2

Some soldier poets by Thomas Sturge Moore (1870-1944)
http://hdl.handle.net/2027/loc.ark:/13960/t20c6772d
Essays on some notable war poets, including some of their work

Carry On: Letters in Wartime, by Lieutenant Coningsby Dawson (1883–1959) (Not PD in Australia either)
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/14086

The war and the future by John Masefield (1878-1967)
http://hdl.handle.net/2027/nyp.33433081594388
A speech and a lecture both given in 1918.

Some war curiosities and the clandestine press in Belgium by Christian Frederick Gauss (1878-1951) (US author, so Rule of the Shorter Term applies where appropriate)
http://hdl.handle.net/2027/wu.89100008390
Very interesting article about the plight of Belgium during the war

PD for everyone - hurray!

A war zone gadabout; being the authentic account of four trips to the fighting nations during 1914, '15, '16 by Austin, Walter, 1864-1929
https://archive.org/details/warzonegadaboutb00aust

The Romance of War Inventions by Thomas W. Corbin
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/34459

The future of war in its technical, economic, and political relations by Bloch, Jan, 1836-1902; Long, Robert Edward Crozier, 1872-1938
https://archive.org/details/futureofwarinits00blociala

Celebrated spies and famous mysteries of the great war by Barton, George, 1866-1940
https://archive.org/details/celebratedspiesf00bart BettyB will read Ch 9 "The Romantic Life of the Dutch-Javanese Dancer Who was Shot as a Spy" for Vol 3

The drama of three hundred & sixty-five days : scenes in the Great War by Caine, Hall, Sir, 1853-1931
https://archive.org/details/dramaofthreehund00cainuoft

Women wanted ; the story written in blood red letters on the horizon of the great world war by Daggett, Mabel Potter, 1871-1927
https://archive.org/details/womenwantedstory00daggrich BettyB will read Ch 4 "Women who wear war jewelry" for Vol 3

War babies by Franchot, Annie Wood; Davis, Mary Louise
A children's story.
https://archive.org/details/warbabies00fran

Democracy versus autocracy; a comparative study of governments in the world war by Geiser, Karl Frederick, b. 1869
https://archive.org/details/democracyversusa00geis

The air scout; an American boy's adventures when the big war in Europe began by Kay, Ross
https://archive.org/details/airscoutamerican00kayr

The Horse and the War by Capt. Sidney Galtrey (1878-1935)
https://archive.org/details/horsewar00galtrich

A 1915 pamphlet called Purple cross service for wounded and sick army horses - sad stuff, I'm afraid.
https://archive.org/details/purplecrossservi00purp

Chapter 6 of The Little Book Of The War by Eva March Tappan (1854-1930) juvenile literature
includes the value in war of mules, pigeons, horses and dogs
https://archive.org/details/TheLittleBookOfTheWar
Scott Danneker read Chapter VIII for Volume 2

Men in War by Andreas Latzko (1876 - 1943)
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/8440

The meaning of the war: life & matter in conflict. ... Henri Bergson (1859-1941)
One speech and one article by the French Nobel laureate philosopher, 1914.
http://hdl.handle.net/2027/mdp.39015008821202

Inter arma; being essays written in time of war by Edmund Gosse (1849-1928)
http://hdl.handle.net/2027/uc2.ark:/13960/t1cj89v3d

French literature of the great war by Albert Schinz (1870-1943)
http://hdl.handle.net/2027/uc1.$b744520
Various articles about poetry, fiction, drama. Not the least interesting in that it mentions various writings that may be suitable for reading in French for this collection.

War's dark frame (1917) by Wadsworth Camp (1879-1936)
Shortish stand-alone anecdotes of the War
https://archive.org/details/warsdarkframe00camp

The Appetite of Tyranny: Including Letters to an Old Garibaldian (1915) by G. K. Chesterton (1874-1936)
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/11605
Philosophical essays on the War

Between St. Dennis and St. George; a sketch of three civilisations (1915) by Ford Madox Ford (as Ford Madox Hueffer) (1873-1939)
Essays on the War
https://archive.org/details/betweenstdenniss00ford

The First World War, 1914-1918 (1920) by Lt. Col. Charles à Court Repington (1858-1925) (ex-colonel acting as a war correspondent)
https://archive.org/details/firstworldwar19101repiuoft

Letters of a Soldier, 1914-1915 by Anon.
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/17316
Selection read by Beth Thomas for Volume 2

Some of these unchecked for PDness outside US:

Tales from a Famished Land by Edward Eyre Hunt (1885–1953)
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/49709/49709-h/49709-h.htm#Page_86
Fourteen stories having their conception in the author's experience serving on the Commission for the Relief of Belgium. Not all are sad, for there is humor even in Belgium, but the greater number are poignant in their exposition of the varied suffering which came with or followed the German army.
[mhhbook recorded Ghosts for volume 2]

The Worn Doorstep by Margaret Pollock Sherwood (1864-1955)
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/42797
An American woman, whose English lover has been killed in the war, rents a house in a tiny English village and finds some comfort in the people who seek shelter over her worn doorstep, helping her to forget personal losses in the greater tragedy of the Belgian refugees. An unusually charming bit of workmanship cast in the form of a journal.
Selection read by Mary in Arkansas for Volume 2

With the American Submarines by Henry B. Beston (1888 – 1968) in the Atlantic Monthly, 1918? http://hdl.handle.net/2027/uc1.32106018804952?urlappend=%3Bseq=700 Beston was the only American correspondent to travel with the British Grand Fleet and to be aboard an American destroyer during combat engagement and sinking. He also wrote a book about his experiences called Full Speed Ahead (1919) available at https://archive.org/details/fullspeedahead00best.

Shell-shock and other neuropsychiatric problems presented in five hundred and eighty-nine case histories from the War literature, 1914-1918 (1919)
https://archive.org/details/shellshockothern00soutuoft

Internet Archive: 14,000 items in the World War One Documents Collection. Not every one is in the US Public Domain, so one must be careful, but it is a treasure trove of books, pamphlets and articles in many languages on just about every subject relating to the War.

The book of the homeless: (Le livre des sans-foyer) -edited by Edith Wharton. This was a book sold for the benefit of refugees and contains contributions from such illustrious characters as Joseph Conrad, Sarah Bernhardt, Thomas Hardy, Henry James, W. B. Yeats to name but a few. Some in English, some in French, some poetry, some prose. Even a score by Stravinsky!
https://archive.org/details/bookofhomelessle00whar_0

Short pamphlets in the US United War Work Campaign series: [BettyB will read for Vol 3]
Victory Girls https://archive.org/details/victorygirls00unit
Victory Boys https://archive.org/details/victoryboys00unit
The campaign among students: https://archive.org/details/campaignamongstu00unit

A Call from Gallipoli by Cecilia Nesbit (1915), described as a prose poem. The writer was Australian, but unfortunately neither I nor the National Library of Australia can find her date of death.
https://archive.org/details/callfromgallipol00nesb

The Groningen Camp Magazine: During October 1914, over 1500 troops from the First Royal Naval Brigade were interned in Groningen, Holland, for the duration of World War I.
http://www.groningencamp.co.uk/index.html

Similarly Ruhleben internment camp was a civilian detention camp during World War I located to the west of Berlin.
https://archive.org/search.php?query=ruhleben%20camp%20magazine%20AND%20mediatype%3Atexts%20AND%20mediatype%3Atexts

Articles from Australian newspapers:
Making an Army: A Look Round the Camps
How Our Soldier Lads Break the Monotony
The First Force: End of the Voyage
Give It Now
The Transports. A Great Fleet

Much in Punch magazine: http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/search/?query=punch+1914

New York Times Current History: The European War, Vol 1, No. 1 by Various 'from the beginning to ' March 1915
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/13635 ; other numbers in this series from the NY Times are here: http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/search/?query=new+york+times+current+history&sort_order=title
[unread pages to read Open Letter to President Wilson by George Bernard Shaw for vol 3]

Many original documents either originally in German or translated into German in:
Die Europäischen Kriegsverhandlung: die maßgebenden Dokumente chronologisch und sinngemäß zusammengestellt ubersetzt und erläutert.
https://archive.org/details/dasregenbogenbuc01beer

Many documents in that book can be found in English or translated into English in The Times documentary history of the war (1917), including The British Blue Book: Great Britain and the European Crisis
https://archive.org/details/timesdocumentary01londuoft

WWI aviation:

Winged Warfare: Hunting the Huns in the Air
https://archive.org/details/wingedwarfarehun00bish

War Flying
https://archive.org/details/warflying00hutc

WWI naval:
https://archive.org/details/doverpatrol01bacogoog
The Dover Patrol 1915-1917 by Admiral Sir Reginald Bacon (1863–1947)

With the American Submarines by Henry B. Beston (1888 – 1968) in the Atlantic Monthly, 1918? http://hdl.handle.net/2027/uc1.32106018804952?urlappend=%3Bseq=700 (US author, so Rule of the Shorter Term applies where appropriate)

Several links at archive.org to texts regarding The Battle of Jutland
https://archive.org/search.php?query=battle%20of%20jutland%20AND%20mediatype%3Atexts

Various types of warfare:
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/32570/32570-h/32570-h.htm
Zeppelin: The Story of a Great Achievement, by Harry Vissering
Has a few references to WWI.

Pen Pictures of British Battles
https://archive.org/stream/penpicturesofbri00londiala#page/n0/mode/2up
Warfare Under Water and The Moonlight Battle for Baghdad recorded by MaryAnn for Vol. I.

The Australian as a Fighter, and A Cool Canadian from Somme Battle Stories: https://archive.org/details/cihm_87758

Best Stories of the 1914 European War
https://archive.org/details/beststoriesof19100newy

Tanks in the Great War 1914-1918
https://archive.org/details/cu31924027835168

The War in Africa 1914-1917, and in the Far East 1914
https://archive.org/details/warinafrica1914100onei

General/political etc
My Mission to London 1912-1914 by Prince Lichnowsky, Late German Ambassador in Great Britain
https://archive.org/details/mymissiontolondo00lichuoft

A War-Time Journal, Germany 1914 and German Travel Notes
https://archive.org/details/awartimejournalg23533gut

The War of 1914 – The Crime of the Century
https://archive.org/details/jstor-20667056

Questions of American Neutrality During the European War 1914-1915
https://archive.org/details/questionsofameri00maha

The War and the Churches (1915)
https://archive.org/details/warandchurches00mccauoft
Preface and Ch. 3 recorded by filp for volume 2

Abstracts of War Surgery…
https://archive.org/details/abstractsofwarsu00unit
(Early Care of Gunshot Wounds of the Jaws and Surrounding Soft Parts recorded by MaryAnn in Vol. I)

Inventions of the Great War by A. Russell (Alexander Russell) Bond (1876-?)
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/45269
MaryAnn read Chapter 11 for Volume 2

How I Filmed the War by Geoffrey H. Malins (1887 - 1943)
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/30285

The Glory of the Coming - What Mine Eyes Have Seen of Americans in Action in This Year of Grace and Allied Endeavor (1918) By Irvin S. Cobb (1876-1944)
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/44225
Chapters 15-16 recorded by Mary in Arkansas for Volume 2

On the Edge of the Storm by Shepherd Knapp (1873 - 1946) reminiscences of a year in France during the War
https://archive.org/details/onedgestormstor00knapgoog

Post-war writings:

Rebuilding Britain: A Survey of Problems of Reconstruction after the World War by Sir Alfred Hopkinson (1851-1939)
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/14870


See also for ideas:

http://www.europeana1914-1918.eu/en/explore
Check for PDness. Some are copyrighted.

Music and popular culture in the First World War:
See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Music_of_World_War_I and
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_War_I_in_popular_culture

Ruth

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Post Posted:: July 4th, 2017, 8:22 pm 

Joined: July 7th, 2015, 10:12 pm
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Would love to start this great project off with the Victory Boys and Girls pamphlets.
Thank you for the vast amount of work you put into this!

Betty


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Post Posted:: July 4th, 2017, 8:39 pm 
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Thanks for kicking off the project Betty!

Setting this up has been a team effort, with most of the work done by others! :wink:

MaryAnn

Summary of Summaries:
1. Boys and Girls Victory Pamphlets: A set of pamphlets released by the United War Work Campaign near the end of the First World War to encourage boys and girls to join the Earn and Give Division and by "sacrifice" and hard work encourage them to pledge $5.00 towards a goal of more than $170 million dollars to make life more comfortable and enjoyable for the troops.

2. Open Letter to President Wilson by George Bernard Shaw: The famous playwright and socialist addresses a plea to the POTUS of the time to express condemnation of the warring parties Germany and England for conducting their battles on the territory of the hapless neutral state, Belgium.

3. "Nos amis d'Amérique", in Quelques aspects du vertige mondial by Pierre Loti: As war rages on in Europe, French writer and retired naval officer Pierre Loti pays tribute to US architect Whitney Warren and more generally to those American citizens who, despite their country's neutrality at that stage, did their best to support the Allies and document what was going on on the Western front.

4. At Ypres with Best-Dunkley by Thomas Hope Floyd, Ch. 12 ''The City and The Trenches'': At Ypres with Best-Dunkley is the collection of extracts from the author's private diary and letters home during the days spent in the Salient and its vicinity, between the Battle of Messines and the Third Battle of Ypres.

5. Women Wanted by Mabel Potter Daggett, Ch 4 ''Women Who Wear War Jewelry'': Fascinating true stories of everyday and titled women who left their husbands and children to serve at or near the front during the war. These women's names are virtually unknown in history books but, in fact, many of them received the highest military honors their countries could bestow, including the Croix de Guerre.

6. Lettere di Giulio Cozzi in Lettere e testimonianze dei ferrovieri caduti per la patria: Hundreds of Italian railway workers had time to tell their loved ones about life on the front before being killed in battle. Giulio Cozzi is just one of them. He was one of the 10,000 to 13,000 Italian casualties at the infamous Battle of Caporetto.

7. A Diary Without Dates by Enid Bagnold, Part 3:

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Post Posted:: July 8th, 2017, 8:40 pm 

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Would you like two separate sections for the two pamphlets? And author as unknown? Seems to be a government publication.

Betty


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Post Posted:: July 9th, 2017, 4:40 am 
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BettyB wrote:
Would you like two separate sections for the two pamphlets? And author as unknown? Seems to be a government publication.

Betty

Betty,

I did a little research on the United War Work Campaign when you claimed these, and seeing that it was a whole big project, for which they were raising funds, I was thinking that "The United War Work Campaign" could be the author.

As to one vs two sections, I haven't read them. It looked like there were three pamphlets in a row (boys, girls and students), so two or more of them could be grouped unless that made the section too long. Does that make sense when you look at the content? If it does flow ok with the content, then I think grouping them may be better than having separate sections for each.

MaryAnn

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Post Posted:: July 28th, 2017, 8:20 pm 

Joined: July 7th, 2015, 10:12 pm
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https://librivox.org/uploads/maryannspiegel/wwi3_boysgirlsvictorypamphlets_unitedwarwork_bs_128kb.mp3

Time is 26:39

A set of pamphlets released by the United War Work Campaign near the end of the First World War to encourage boys and girls to join the Earn and Give Division and by "sacrifice" and hard work encourage them to pledge $5.00 towards a goal of more than $170 million dollars to make life more comfortable and enjoyable for the troops.

Betty

Will be back after vacation to record another section. Great choice..


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Post Posted:: July 28th, 2017, 8:39 pm 
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Thank you Betty. On my list to PL after Crisco (and we'll just let the world wonder what that little inside joke refers to . . . )
MaryAnn

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Post Posted:: August 15th, 2017, 7:38 am 

Joined: September 1st, 2012, 7:34 pm
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There is a Collection entitled The New York Times Current History - A Monthly Magazine: The European War, published 1915, available here
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/13635/13635-h/13635-h.htm#page76
From this I would like to contribute Open Letter to President Wilson by George Bernard Shaw. Summary as follows:
The famous playwright and socialist addresses a plea to the POTUS of the time to express condemnation of the warring parties Germany and England for conducting their battles on the territory of the hapless neutral state, Belgium.
Peter Tucker


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Post Posted:: August 15th, 2017, 12:02 pm 
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That sounds great Peter. Thank you for contributing.

I need to find something to read myself, and the NYTimes books seem like a good place to go looking. Lot of interesting articles in there.

MaryAnn

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Post Posted:: August 15th, 2017, 10:06 pm 

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Sect 2 uploaded
https://librivox.org/uploads/maryannspiegel/wwi3_openletterwilson_shaw_pt_128kb.mp3
11:54
Peter


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Post Posted:: August 16th, 2017, 5:59 am 
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Thank you Peter. I'll PL shortly.
MaryAnn

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Post Posted:: August 16th, 2017, 6:01 pm 
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Betty,
Victory Girls and Boys is PL OK.
MaryAnn

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Post Posted:: August 21st, 2017, 12:43 pm 

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Hi there! :)

I'd like to contribute a brief piece by French writer Pierre Loti entitled "Nos amis d'Amérique" (literally Our Friends from America). Definitely not one of his most memorable works but clearly a product of its time—the time being January 1917.

*Author: Pierre Loti
*Title: "Nos amis d'Amérique", in Quelques aspects du vertige mondial
*Date: 1917
*Language: French
*Link to text: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/31918/31918-h/31918-h.htm#NOS_AMIS_DAMERIQUE
*Summary: As war rages on in Europe, French writer and retired naval officer Pierre Loti pays tribute to US architect Whitney Warren and more generally to those American citizens who, despite their country's neutrality at that stage, did their best to support the Allies and document what was going on on the Western front.


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Post Posted:: August 21st, 2017, 2:59 pm 

Joined: July 17th, 2013, 9:55 am
Posts: 105
Location: France
BeniaminoMassimo wrote:
*Author: Pierre Loti
*Title: "Nos amis d'Amérique", in Quelques aspects du vertige mondial
*Date: 1917
*Language: French
*Link to text: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/31918/31918-h/31918-h.htm#NOS_AMIS_DAMERIQUE
*Summary: As war rages on in Europe, French writer and retired naval officer Pierre Loti pays tribute to US architect Whitney Warren and more generally to those American citizens who, despite their country's neutrality at that stage, did their best to support the Allies and document what was going on on the Western front.

*Link to the mp3 file: https://librivox.org/uploads/maryannspiegel/wwi3_amisdamerique_loti_bm_128kb.mp3
*Duration: 6:58

:)


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