Films better than books

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fiddlesticks
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Post by fiddlesticks » January 16th, 2017, 3:30 pm

Charles Dickens is my favorite author, and I have read almost all of his books just a few left to get to. The only one I did not like was Great Expectations. I can definitely understand why people do not like his books though. I love the details, all the quirky characters, and long descriptions. He was actually paid by the word which explains why he liked to be so wordy! I have watched quite a few movies/series based on his books and enjoyed most of them, especially Little Dorrit and Bleak House.

Movies better than books, I have never been a Jane Austen fan, her books are enjoyable, but I do not love them and Pride and Prejudice is my least favorite of all (though I have not read Persuasion) But I do really like the mini series version of P&P, much more than the book!
~Tiffany

help read a good old fashioned romance by the author of 'The Wide, Wide World' Say and Seal

annise
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Post by annise » January 16th, 2017, 4:31 pm

mjfillen wrote:Well, I... That is ... You see...
Hey! Look!
[*points over your shoulder*]
WHAT IS THAT?!?!?!?
[*runs the opposite direction*]
Chicken :D
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kukailimoku
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Post by kukailimoku » January 16th, 2017, 5:47 pm

The list is mighty short but a few that stick in my mind would be "Jurassic Park" (the novel plods along with too much detail on the science and little or no character development...yawn), "Charlie & the Chocolate Factory" (I already miss you, Gene), "Jaws" (the book was okay but the movie made even lakes scary), "The Jungle Book" (the cartoon one), "Madame Doubtfire" (I miss you too, Robin) and "The Wizard of Oz".
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pjcsaville
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Post by pjcsaville » May 30th, 2017, 11:05 am

The 100 by Kass Morgan was the most boring book I've probably ever read (besides Outlander and Watership Down) because I abandoned it about 50 pages in but the TV series rocked! Probably one of my favorite shows.

The Jungle Book wasn't that good but Disney made it better with the movie lol.

I can't think of any other. The Lord of the Rings movies were just as epic as the books. Though I WISH Tolkien had the Elves march to the aid of Helm's Deep (probably one of my favorite moments in the movies, besides Galadriel casting Sauron out of Dol Guldur but that was in the Hobbit movies lol). Tolkien SHOULD have had the Elves help out in the book lol! So EPIC!

CliveCatterall
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Post by CliveCatterall » June 2nd, 2017, 7:50 am

enko wrote:
Hazel Pethig wrote:The Hitchhikers Guide To The Galaxy

While the movie was great, nothing can come close to the book. Douglas Adams had such a unique way of thinking that no one can come imitate to his impressive talent. All 5 books of the trilogy are great, but nothing comes close to the first one.
Err.. Hazel. The thread is about movies being better than the books they were based on. Not the contrary.
Err

[engaging nerd mode]
The original H2G2 was a radio series, which IMHO was better than the books, movies, TV series, action toys etc. I believe SF works best as audio [thanks mark nelson, phil chenevert, mark smith etc etc. etc.]

(someone usually says "audio is best because the pictures are better" at this point - and we all throw vegetables)

[disengaging nerd mode]

:thumbs:

Clive

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Post by CliveCatterall » June 2nd, 2017, 7:58 am

The Inspector Morse TV series was heaps better than the Colin Dexter novels on which it was based.

Clive

realisticspeakers
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Post by realisticspeakers » October 5th, 2017, 6:48 pm

Shōgun

Was the first ebook I've read way back when the Franklin E-reader was hot.

The made-for-tv miniseries was just visually splendid.

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Post by Eye4words » October 8th, 2017, 11:12 am

Only one haunting word. PSYCHO

RepublicOfVermont
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Post by RepublicOfVermont » October 27th, 2017, 5:18 pm

oofw wrote:i havent read "the shining" by steven king but the movie seems to be pretty good
The film is far better. Stanley Kubrick at his ever-finest. Which leads me to "A Clockwork Orange"; his film was by far better than the book. Kubrick's films are stunning no matter what. Dr. Strangelove or How I Learned to Love the Bomb (tied with 2001 A Space Odyssey) being my absolute favorite. Oh the truth in that film!
Last edited by RepublicOfVermont on October 29th, 2017, 7:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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mightyfelix
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Post by mightyfelix » October 29th, 2017, 1:49 pm

pjcsaville wrote:The 100 by Kass Morgan was the most boring book I've probably ever read (besides Outlander and Watership Down)
^Emphasis added^

Please, please, please give Watership Down another try! Although of course there are many "favorite" books, this one may possibly be THE favorite book of mine. I've read it at least a dozen times. I adore the character development*, the rich culture and folklore (and even the beginnings of language!) that Adams creates, the detailed research he's done into the behavior of wild rabbits which gives the book such a feeling of realism, and of course, we all love to see the clever guy play a great trick on the strong guy, right???

*Hazel goes from being a weak and ignored member on the outskirts of a community to being a wise and kind leader who understands and can utilize the strengths of his followers to achieve a better community. Strawberry goes from a pampered rich kid (in a sense) to being the only guy who braves the dangers of Efrafa, not once, but twice, and Bigwig goes from a hot-head who can be a bit of a bully to a brave, tenacious, and loyal friend. I could go on.... But I won't..... :mrgreen:


But you should read it again, like for real!
Devorah Allen

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mightyfelix
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Post by mightyfelix » November 8th, 2017, 6:12 pm

Also, Inkheart. I only saw it once, and I've only read the book(s) once, but from what I remember, the movie felt more satisfying as a story (although there's a slight continuity error that my husband pointed out). The book, Inkheart, is the first in a trilogy, and the completion of the trilogy had what was, to me, an unsatisfying ending. I think, upon reflection, that it may be because it doesn't fit into the hero's journey framework. The movie dealt with only the first book in the trilogy, altering the ending to make the second two unnecessary.
Devorah Allen

Feminism: The Future of the Women's Movement
Journal of Francis Asbury, traveling preacher in America 1771-1815
Four-act play: If I Had a Father by George MacDonald. One teensy role left! Try your hand at a dramatic reading!

mlee
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Post by mlee » November 11th, 2017, 11:14 am

Sense and Sensibility (1995)
Emma Thompson ... Elinor Dashwood Hugh Grant ... Edward Ferrars
The book cannot capture the high emotion when Emma Thompson (Ellinor Dashwood) says to Marianne:
"What do you know of my heart? What do you know of anything but your own suffering. For weeks, Marianne, I've had this pressing on me without being at liberty to speak of it to a single creature. It was forced on me by the very person whose prior claims ruined all my hope. I have endured her exultations again and again whilst knowing myself to be divided from Edward forever. Believe me, Marianne, had I not been bound to silence I could have provided proof enough of a broken heart, even for you."

Or when Hugh Grant (Edward Ferrars) says to Ellinor Dashwood:
"I-I've come here with no expectations, only to profess, now that I am at liberty to do so, that my heart is, and always will be, yours."

Or when Marianne says to Willoughby:
"Good God! Willoughby, what is the meaning of this? Have you not received my letters? Will you not shake hands with me?"

Even "you cant handle the truth" doesn't raise to high emotional peak as these three book/movie quotes.

mlee

SPly
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Post by SPly » November 21st, 2017, 10:02 am

gypsygirl wrote:I prefer the film adaptation of The Princess Bride to the book.
Same here, because I have never read the book. (It sounded rather dark)

SPly
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Post by SPly » November 21st, 2017, 10:07 am

Mary Poppins?

The film was way better than the book.
In the book there is a creepy candy lady who breaks off her fingers and gives them to children to eat, because her fingers turn into gingerbread.
(GROSS!)

mightyfelix
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Post by mightyfelix » November 22nd, 2017, 8:03 am

SPly wrote: Same here, because I have never read the book. (It sounded rather dark)
I've read it, but only once. I don't remember it being particularly dark. There are several interjections of the author (pretending to be the editor), some of which are kind of jabs at classical authors deviating from the storyline to make an aside about something tangentially related. I kind of resented those jabs, because I usually enjoy those deviations.

That being said, Inigo and Fezzik breaking into the Pit of Despair is WAY better in the book!
Devorah Allen

Feminism: The Future of the Women's Movement
Journal of Francis Asbury, traveling preacher in America 1771-1815
Four-act play: If I Had a Father by George MacDonald. One teensy role left! Try your hand at a dramatic reading!

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