[COMPLETE] WWI Centenary Prose Collection Vol. II-RuthieG

Solo or group recordings that are finished and fully available for listeners
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RuthieG
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Post by RuthieG » October 20th, 2015, 7:12 am

Oh, that is a pity :(. But thank you so much for clarifying this with the author, Livia.

Ruth
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Post by zeppelfahrt » October 21st, 2015, 3:24 pm

I would like to read the following:
Randall, Homer: Army Boys on the Firing Line, Chapter XIV, The Storm of War

The text of this tale can be found here:
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/21671/21671-h/21671-h.htm#chap14

The recording of my reading of this tale can be found here:
https://librivox.org/uploads/ruthieg/wwi2_stormofwar_randall_jsd_128kb.mp3

Synopsis:
While huddled in their trench under an enemy artillery barrage, three plucky American 'dough-boys' contemplate the German attack that will most certainly follow. A classic example of early 20th Century, American juvenile-fiction, with lots of good old Yankee stoicism and hubris.

Duration: 00:10:28
Last edited by zeppelfahrt on October 21st, 2015, 3:52 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Cheers
Scott
All the old buoys which have marked the channel of our lives seem to have been swept away. ~ Lord Esher

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Post by RuthieG » October 21st, 2015, 4:07 pm

Thank you, Scott! Ah, yet another Stratemeyer house pseudonym - one I haven't come across before :).

Ruth
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Post by zeppelfahrt » October 22nd, 2015, 4:48 am

My pleasure Ruth, I was fun to put together yesterday.
The Army Boy Series was published by George Sully & Co.; and later on by World Syndicate 1919.
Best Regards,
-Scott
Cheers
Scott
All the old buoys which have marked the channel of our lives seem to have been swept away. ~ Lord Esher

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Post by mhhbook » October 22nd, 2015, 1:13 pm

Perhaps a chapter or two could be taken from this interesting sounding book by E. E. Cummings. Here’s a brief description from Wikipedia:

The Enormous Room is a 1922 autobiographical novel by the poet and novelist E. E. Cummings about his temporary imprisonment in France during World War I.

Cummings served as an ambulance driver during the war. In late August 1917 his friend and colleague, William Slater Brown (known in the book only as B.), were arrested by French authorities as a result of anti-war sentiments B. had expressed in some letters. When questioned, Cummings stood by his friend and was also arrested…

…Cummings thus spent over four months in the prison. He met a number of interesting characters and had many picaresque adventures, which he compiled into The Enormous Room. The book is written as a mix between Cummings' well-known unconventional grammar and diction and the witty voice of a young Harvard-educated intellectual in an absurd situation.

Here’s the Gutenberg link to the book:

http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/8446/pg8446-images.html
Mary

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Post by RuthieG » October 22nd, 2015, 1:19 pm

Thanks, Mary - I'll put it on the list with a link to your post :).

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Post by MaryAnnSpiegel » October 23rd, 2015, 8:33 pm

Army boys is PL OK. You read that with a fair amount of hubris! Well done!
MaryAnn

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Post by mhhbook » October 29th, 2015, 8:37 pm

Some of the essays in this book may be good candidates for this WWI centenary project:

Waiting for Daylight by H. M. Tomlinson:
https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/27246

A brief description: Tomlinson returned to the theme of war in Waiting for Day-light (1922), a collection of essays about his reactions to modern warfare. While many of the pieces do not directly address the war—his topics include the writings of Thomas Carlyle, the figureheads of sailing ships, and travel books—the book's central premise is that the war robbed the world of its innocence, permanently changing the nature of serious discussion on any topic.
Mary

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Post by RuthieG » October 30th, 2015, 3:00 am

Thanks, Mary. Should be an interesting one - official war correspondent for the British Army and anti-war. Not PD for death+70 readers, however.

Ruth
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Post by mhhbook » October 30th, 2015, 5:59 am

RuthieG wrote:Thanks, Mary. Should be an interesting one - official war correspondent for the British Army and anti-war. Not PD for death+70 readers, however.

Ruth
I thought that might be the case. Gosh, life is complicated enough without all the copyright laws :(
Mary

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Post by MaryAnnSpiegel » October 30th, 2015, 7:49 am

Ah, but it would be OK for me. I'll take a look. I put in a few sections on volume 1, but so far nothing on volume 2.

MaryAnn

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Post by RuthieG » October 30th, 2015, 11:09 am

It occurred to me, when I saw this tweet, that we didn't have anything in these collections on the part animals and birds played in the war. What with horses, mules, dogs, carrier pigeons etc., I'm sure they were used extensively.

I found this book, which doesn't deal only with messenger pigeons, but many other aspects of the war's effect on birds.
Birds and the War by Hugh Stewart Gladstone (I haven't found his dates yet.)
https://archive.org/details/birdsandwarglads00gladrich

The Horse and the War by Capt. Sidney Galtrey (1878-1935)
https://archive.org/details/horsewar00galtrich

A 1915 pamphlet called Purple cross service for wounded and sick army horses - sad stuff, I'm afraid.
https://archive.org/details/purplecrossservi00purp

Chapter 6 of The Little Book Of The War by Eva March Tappan (1854-1930) juvenile literature
includes the value in war of mules, pigeons, horses and dogs
https://archive.org/details/TheLittleBookOfTheWar

Ruth
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Post by commonsparrow3 » October 30th, 2015, 2:54 pm

RuthieG wrote:I found this book, which doesn't deal only with messenger pigeons, but many other aspects of the war's effect on birds.
Birds and the War by Hugh Stewart Gladstone (I haven't found his dates yet.)
https://archive.org/details/birdsandwarglads00gladrich
Oh! May I please claim the chapter on "Birds as Messengers" from this book? (Fortunately I'm in the US, where author's death date doesn't matter.)
Maria

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Post by RuthieG » October 30th, 2015, 3:12 pm

Oh good! Yes, please, Maria!

ETA Found him at last in Who was Who, and he was Scottish and died in 1949, so he wouldn't have been PD for us poor ol' Europeans.

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Post by zeppelfahrt » October 31st, 2015, 5:50 am

I would like to read the following:
The Story of the Great War, Volume VIII, Chapter XV, AUSTRIA-HUNGARY AND GERMANY SURRENDER

The text may be found here:
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/34444/34444-h/34444-h.htm#page147

Thanks,
-Scott
Cheers
Scott
All the old buoys which have marked the channel of our lives seem to have been swept away. ~ Lord Esher

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