OPEN[GROUP]Multilingual Short Works Collection 027 - Poetry & Prose by Various - thw

Deutsche Projekte, Nederlandstalige Projecten, Proyectos en español, projets en français, Projekty po polsku, 日本語のプロジェクト
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Kitty
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Post by Kitty » November 3rd, 2020, 6:58 am

lorda wrote:
November 2nd, 2020, 9:32 pm
Sebaldusnacht von Paul Busson
Text URL: https://www.projekt-gutenberg.org/busson/sebaldus/titlepage.html (1914)
Duration: 18:15
MP3 URL: https://librivox.org/uploads/toddhw/msw027_sebaldusnacht_busson_loa_128kb.mp3
Key Words: multilingual, german, short story, creepy, scary
ach nein wie gruselig ! Ich habe mir aber ziemlich schnell gedacht, dass der auf dem Rad der Bruder ist ;)

a wonderfully creepy story now for the dark season. Extremely well narrated, Bernd ! Thank you so much, a worthy addition for the collection.

Totally PL ok :)

Sonia

Kazbek
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Post by Kazbek » November 3rd, 2020, 9:33 pm

invisibleCat wrote:
October 30th, 2020, 10:25 pm
Hello Michael,
Thanks for proof listening and being so thorough! Here's the new link. Length: 5:32
https://librivox.org/uploads/toddhw/msw027_jianzhukeshu_li_ic_128kb.mp3

I did noise reduction on my last recording, but this time I did more. It made the recording sound a bit harsher than I like, but hopefully the noise level is acceptable this time!
I changed how I pronounce 與 (2:10) and 韶 (3:35, 3:44). The rest of the words you pointed out included typos of the text (官 /宫, 士/土) or 通假字 which I was taught to pronounce as the ‘correct’ character: 說/悦,擇/释 etc., I did not change these.
Thanks again and please let me know if you have more questions!
The new recording is PL OK! :thumbs: For the future, we have a standard Chinese disclaimer here:

https://wiki.librivox.org/index.php?title=LibriVox_disclaimer#Chinese

Your version is similar and I trust that the translation is good, but it's better to use that one for consistency.

I hope to see many more recordings from you! :)

Michael

Kazbek
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Post by Kazbek » November 4th, 2020, 9:14 pm

VivienneWong wrote:
November 2nd, 2020, 3:34 am
Hi there, for my part I've updated these (marked as done). Others are not real error for me though. If I need to correct them anyway please let me know. Many thanks!

1. The recommended disclaimer in Chinese can be found at https://wiki.librivox.org/index.php?title=LibriVox_disclaimer#Chinese (中文放棄著作權聲明 開頭 請參考) -done
2. 0:21 第五章 根據離婚在 https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/24042 中的排序應為第七章 - done
3. 1:14 正對著八三 應為 正對八三
4. 2:44 他們灶 應為 他們的灶
5. 2:59 回到那邊 應為 回到那邊去
6. 3:07 姘上小寡婦 應為 姘上了小寡婦
7. 3:18 七大人怎麽樣 應為 七大人怎樣
8. 6:02 大聲叫道 應為 大聲叫著
9. 6:45 哼起了佛號來 應為 哼起佛號來
10. 9:08 一列泊著 應為 一列地泊著
11. 11:00 大殮時候 應為 大殮的時候
12. 11:51 較半年之前 應為 較之半年前 - done
13. 12:07 木莊三 應為 莊木三 - done
14. 13:43 揣想的那樣可怕 應為 揣想那樣的可怕
15. 14:11 咬死那匹大公雞 應為 咬死了那匹大公雞
16. 14:52 縣里的不行 應為 縣里不行
17. 16:26 臭癟蟲 應為 癟臭蟲 - done
18. 17:06 發話了 應為 說話了
19. 17:22 那(四聲)個 應為 那(三聲)個 - done
20. 17:36 他那(四聲)里 應為 他那(三聲)里
21. 18:34 全客廳是 應為 全客廳里是
22. 19:05 萬料不到的 應為 萬料不到
23. 19:49 帶來的了 應為 帶來了的
24. 20:19 小烏龜的頭 應為 小烏龜頭
25. 40:42 似乎那打噴嚏 應為 似乎要打噴嚏 - done
26. 21:24 大殮時候 應為 大殮的時候
27. 21:48 頓然見了 應為 頓然見得 - done

I have no permission to access BC window so just say it here, I uploaded the new file, should be the same link.
Hi Vivienne,

I did spot PL and there are a couple of issues I'd like to bring up.

1) For #25 above, I hear 似乎了打噴嚏 (or something similar) instead of 似乎要打噴嚏. The difference in meaning seems minor, so you're welcome to leave it as is.

2) The average volume is 81.6 dB, which is outside of our 86-92 dB target range. Normally, one would use the Amplify effect in Audacity to fix that, but your reading has a wide dynamic range, and amplifying the track would lead to some clipped, distorted sounds. What we need here is some compression. If you use Audacity, please use the Compressor effect, decreasing the Threshold to -20 dB and checking the box "Compress based on peaks", with defaults for the other settings. This gives more even dynamics with the average volume right in the middle of the target range.

Thanks,
Michael

HannaPonomarenko
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Post by HannaPonomarenko » November 6th, 2020, 6:21 pm

Hi! Here is another folk tale in Ukrainian, which is a total nonsence :mrgreen:
The title was converted into Ukrainian the same way as for my previous submission.

Title: Не любо - не слухай
Author: unknown
Uploader Link: https://librivox.org/uploads/toddhw/msw027_neliuboneslukhay_unknown_phb_128kb.mp3
Duration: 3:18
Source: https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=chi.085315935&view=1up&seq=101
Publication date: 1847
Language: Ukrainian
Key words: folk tale, lying tale, absurd, nonsence, небылица, нісенітниця

Thank you)

HannaPonomarenko
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Post by HannaPonomarenko » November 7th, 2020, 12:27 am

Michael, after some time I realized we need another keyword (group) for Kozhemiaka. Please add the following
Київ, Киев, Kyiv, Kiev.
Thank you)

Kazbek
Posts: 1751
Joined: April 24th, 2019, 12:06 pm

Post by Kazbek » November 7th, 2020, 8:36 am

HannaPonomarenko wrote:
November 6th, 2020, 6:21 pm
Hi! Here is another folk tale in Ukrainian, which is a total nonsence :mrgreen:
The title was converted into Ukrainian the same way as for my previous submission.

Title: Не любо - не слухай
Author: unknown
Uploader Link: https://librivox.org/uploads/toddhw/msw027_neliuboneslukhay_unknown_phb_128kb.mp3
Duration: 3:18
Source: https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=chi.085315935&view=1up&seq=101
Publication date: 1847
Language: Ukrainian
Key words: folk tale, lying tale, absurd, nonsence, небылица, нісенітниця

Thank you)
Thank you, Hanna! Also added keywords for Kozhemiaka.

M.


Kitty
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Post by Kitty » November 9th, 2020, 5:56 am

HannaPonomarenko wrote:
November 6th, 2020, 6:21 pm
Hi! Here is another folk tale in Ukrainian, which is a total nonsence :mrgreen:
Title: Не любо - не слухай
Uploader Link: https://librivox.org/uploads/toddhw/msw027_neliuboneslukhay_unknown_phb_128kb.mp3
Duration: 3:18
thank you, Hannah, also totally PL ok. I must admit that I didn't understand much of the nonsense. What was it about ? :hmm: I admit defeat in my vocabulary here. :oops:

You could have included the final credit which was in brackets, but it's also fine to leave it out, your choice was ok :)

Sonia

HannaPonomarenko
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Post by HannaPonomarenko » November 9th, 2020, 10:15 am

Kitty wrote:
November 9th, 2020, 5:56 am

You could have included the final credit which was in brackets, but it's also fine to leave it out, your choice was ok :)
Yeah, I was not in the mood of giving the final credit)))

I'm sure, most of Ukrainians will have hard time understanding it, but I decided it was worth recording besause the language is very folky and because we have a Russian tale with the same title at our Russian folk tales project - #7 at viewtopic.php?f=60&t=80880 (it's a different nonsense :mrgreen: ). As for me I love the passage about mice here :)

A brief summary of the lying tale is the following:
"It was back in the days when I was young and my grandfather was a kid and my father hadn't been born yet.
My grandfather and I went to the forset to cut some wood for the winter was cold. I saw a big pile of wood. A bear run away form it. I found six eggs, really jumbo ones. My grandfarther and I couldn't pick them up to the wagon, but I managed somehow to take them into my hat.
Fortunately, at home our pig was about to give birth to piglets, so I laid the eggs under her. So six bulls came out of those eggs. We worked the wheat with them. So much wheat! We look at the fields and all of themwere not ours (because they were lazy to work the wheat, I reckon). We advertised for wheat workers, but only one woman came. She made so many bundles of wheat that finaly a cat wagged his tail chasing mice and they ended up in a garbage can.
My farther has grown by that time. My marther liked to work but my farther and I liked to lay behind the heater. My farther was a good fisher, he fished other people's jackets, so we became not that poor as we had been.
My mother died and father called a dinner but the guests had to come with their own spoon, sault and bread. So many people came - two! My father told them to salt a pile of food in the plate and eat out the soup so at the bottom of the plate they will find fish (which was a lie I reckon). Those men didn't even thank us! "

Thanks for listening)

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Post by Kitty » November 10th, 2020, 12:23 am

HannaPonomarenko wrote:
November 9th, 2020, 10:15 am
I'm sure, most of Ukrainians will have hard time understanding it, but I decided it was worth recording besause the language is very folky and because we have a Russian tale with the same title at our Russian folk tales project - #7 at viewtopic.php?f=60&t=80880 (it's a different nonsense :mrgreen: ). As for me I love the passage about mice here :)
ok it's reassuring I'm not the only one finding it hard. :lol: Thank you for the excerpt, indeed, it is a bunch of nonsense. I actually understood some key words (for example, I noticed at one point they were talking about eggs), but I didn't understand enough to really get the meaning.

Sonia

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Post by HannaPonomarenko » November 10th, 2020, 1:38 am

Kitty wrote:
November 10th, 2020, 12:23 am
HannaPonomarenko wrote:
November 9th, 2020, 10:15 am
I'm sure, most of Ukrainians will have hard time understanding it, but I decided it was worth recording besause the language is very folky and because we have a Russian tale with the same title at our Russian folk tales project - #7 at viewtopic.php?f=60&t=80880 (it's a different nonsense :mrgreen: ). As for me I love the passage about mice here :)
ok it's reassuring I'm not the only one finding it hard. :lol: Thank you for the excerpt, indeed, it is a bunch of nonsense. I actually understood some key words (for example, I noticed at one point they were talking about eggs), but I didn't understand enough to really get the meaning.

Sonia
I hope a listener will guess obsolete, rare and agricultureal words following my intonation) It was the only hand I could stretch to them :lol:
Speaking about key words and understanding. Only after this recording I began to comprehend a famous saying by Khruschev "я вам покажу кузькину мать" during Karibian crisis. The poor translator had to come with Kuzma's mother :mrgreen: .
Не любо не слушай has the phrase: як вклюнулася та кузька, ой же ж як вклюнулася! мишi. I found in a dictionary that кузька means a desaster for the yield.

Kitty
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Post by Kitty » November 10th, 2020, 1:45 am

HannaPonomarenko wrote:
November 10th, 2020, 1:38 am
Only after this recording I began to comprehend a famous saying by Khruschev "я вам покажу кузькину мать" during Karibian crisis. The poor translator had to come with Kuzma's mother :mrgreen: .
Не любо не слушай has the phrase: як вклюнулася та кузька, ой же ж як вклюнулася! мишi. I found in a dictionary that кузька means a desaster for the yield.
interesting, yes that is probably the etymology of the word then. Although wiktionary also doesn't mention the "desaster" etymology, but yes, the sense of the set phrase is probably clear. https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%D0%BF%D0%BE%D0%BA%D0%B0%D0%B7%D0%B0%D1%82%D1%8C_%D0%BA%D1%83%D0%B7%D1%8C%D0%BA%D0%B8%D0%BD%D1%83_%D0%BC%D0%B0%D1%82%D1%8C#Russian

Sonia

HannaPonomarenko
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Post by HannaPonomarenko » November 10th, 2020, 1:57 am

Kitty wrote:
November 10th, 2020, 1:45 am

interesting, yes that is probably the etymology of the word then. Although wiktionary also doesn't mention the "desaster" etymology, but yes, the sense of the set phrase is probably clear. https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%D0%BF%D0%BE%D0%BA%D0%B0%D0%B7%D0%B0%D1%82%D1%8C_%D0%BA%D1%83%D0%B7%D1%8C%D0%BA%D0%B8%D0%BD%D1%83_%D0%BC%D0%B0%D1%82%D1%8C#Russian

Sonia
Here is the disaster meaning under the third bullet. I found it yesterday)
https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%9F%D0%BE%D0%BA%D0%B0%D0%B7%D0%B0%D1%82%D1%8C_%D0%BA%D1%83%D0%B7%D1%8C%D0%BA%D0%B8%D0%BD%D1%83_%D0%BC%D0%B0%D1%82%D1%8C

The guess about a puppy seems funny now)

Kitty
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Post by Kitty » November 10th, 2020, 2:19 am

well actually it probably means the beetle, not the disaster as such. Seems like this sort of pest-beetle is called that way. You can even click on it and see the beetle. Interesting about the mother being even worse than the son. In English they have the same idea with "Grendel's mother". Grendel being the monster in the epic poem Beowulf, and once he was slain, the mother came to have revenge for her son.

Sonia

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Post by HannaPonomarenko » November 10th, 2020, 2:35 am

Kitty wrote:
November 10th, 2020, 2:19 am
well actually it probably means the beetle, not the disaster as such. Seems like this sort of pest-beetle is called that way. You can even click on it and see the beetle. Interesting about the mother being even worse than the son. In English they have the same idea with "Grendel's mother". Grendel being the monster in the epic poem Beowulf, and once he was slain, the mother came to have revenge for her son.

Sonia
Yes, it's interesting about the mother) My mother is also more powerfull in the arts than I am :lol: I heard about Beowulf from her)
Yes, the beetle is a literary meaning, but in Не любо не слушай we have mice, so I feel the usage of кузька went further then a beetle. And Khrushchev having Ukrainian agricultural background could say it meaning a disaster, according to my imagination :mrgreen:

The dictionary I used (#2 before semicolomn).
https://goroh.pp.ua/%D0%A2%D0%BB%D1%83%D0%BC%D0%B0%D1%87%D0%B5%D0%BD%D0%BD%D1%8F/%D0%BA%D1%83%D0%B7%D1%8C%D0%BA%D0%B0

Thanks for an interesting discussion :D

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