[GROUP]Multilingual Short Works Collection 026 - Poetry & Prose by Various - thw

Deutsche Projekte, Nederlandstalige Projecten, Proyectos en español, projets en français, Projekty po polsku, 日本語のプロジェクト
Kazbek
Posts: 1215
Joined: April 24th, 2019, 12:06 pm

Post by Kazbek » August 1st, 2020, 4:29 am

Piotrek81 wrote:
August 1st, 2020, 1:02 am
On this day in 1944, the Warsaw Uprising began. Among the fallen was a young poet-soldier, Krzysztof Kamil Baczyński.
The following is one of his best-known poems. I remember reading it in school.

Title: "Elegia o..." (commonly known as "Elegia o chłopcu polskim")
Uploader link: https://librivox.org/uploads/toddhw/msw026_elegia_baczynski_pn81_128kb.mp3
Duration: 1:03
Author: Krzysztof Kamil Baczyński
Birth and Death dates: 1921-1944
Publication date: Manuscript from 1944
Text source: https://pl.wikisource.org/wiki/Elegia_o... (but I cross-checked it with the manuscript at https://polona.pl/item/kodeks-42-44,MjYzNTg1MTU/67/#info:metadata )
Author on Wikipedia: https://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krzysztof_Kamil_Baczy%C5%84ski
Language: Polish
Hi, Piotrek. Unfortunately, this poem doesn't appear to be in the PD. It was published after 1924. I've checked HathiTrust to see if it's available in FullView due to lapsed copyright, but it's not the case. :(

Michael

Piotrek81
Posts: 3789
Joined: November 3rd, 2011, 2:02 pm
Location: Poznań, Poland

Post by Piotrek81 » August 1st, 2020, 4:31 am

You're right. I mixed up the EU 70 years rule with the US laws. :roll:
Come help us record The Deluge THE DELUGE IS BACK!
Want to hear some PREPARATION TIPS before you press "record"? Listen to THIS and THIS

Sandyreads97
Posts: 13
Joined: July 24th, 2020, 7:38 am

Post by Sandyreads97 » August 1st, 2020, 7:23 am

Hello! Just found this novel in my garage, so figured I'd record it!

Title: Kamizelka
Author: Boleslaw Prus

Link to author on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boles%C5%82aw_Prus
Link to title on Wikipedia :https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Waistcoat

Number of sections (files) this project will have: 1
Does the project have an introduction or preface [y/n]: No
Original publication date (if known): 1882

Recording:
https://librivox.org/uploads/toddhw/msw026_[kamizelka]_[prus]_[sf]_128kb.mp3

Kazbek
Posts: 1215
Joined: April 24th, 2019, 12:06 pm

Post by Kazbek » August 1st, 2020, 7:58 am

Sandyreads97 wrote:
August 1st, 2020, 7:23 am
Hello! Just found this novel in my garage, so figured I'd record it!

Title: Kamizelka
Author: Boleslaw Prus

Link to author on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boles%C5%82aw_Prus
Link to title on Wikipedia :https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Waistcoat

Number of sections (files) this project will have: 1
Does the project have an introduction or preface [y/n]: No
Original publication date (if known): 1882

Recording:
https://librivox.org/uploads/toddhw/msw026_[kamizelka]_[prus]_[sf]_128kb.mp3
Hello, and thanks for your contribution! Unfortunately, in order to ensure that the recording is in the public domain in the US, where our servers are located, we need to verify not only the original publication date of the work, but also the publication date of the edition you read from. We can use a scan where the title page shows a publication year of 1924 or earlier, or a text from gutenberg.org, or a text that is available in FullView at HathiTrust.org. I did a quick search and found only one edition of this story that we can use:

https://polona.pl/item/kamizelka-michalko,NzI1NTM3MTQ/4/#info:metadata

It sounds like you read from a physical book. If its title page shows a year of 1924 or earlier, we'll need to have an image of the title page. Otherwise, we'll have to ask you to compare your reading to a PD edition and change any discrepancies to match that edition, or else record the text again from a PD edition. Don't hesitate to ask us about PD status of a text you're planning to use before recording it, so as to avoid extra efforts like these.

A couple of other things:

Since this seems to be your first contribution, please let me know under what name (real or nickname) you would like to be credited in the catalog. We can also include a link to your personal website or blog, if you have one.

The filename should omit the square brackets: msw026_kamizelka_prus_sf_128kb.mp3

Thanks!
Michael

Liber
Posts: 97
Joined: May 26th, 2020, 5:50 am

Post by Liber » August 2nd, 2020, 2:36 pm

Here's my attempt at "Romeo and Juliet" - pardon: "Mariotto e Giannozza".
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Mariotto e Giannozza, Novella XXXIII del Novellino, di Masuccio Salernitano (1410–1475)
Text URL: https://archive.org/details/bub_gb_21dCU4chVzoC/page/n419/mode/2up
Duration: 26:32
MP3 URL: https://librivox.org/uploads/toddhw/msw026_mariottoegiannozza_masucciosalernitano_le_128kb.mp3
Link to author on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Masuccio_Salernitano
Key Words: multilingual, italian, novellino, masuccio salernitano, romantic, tragedy, sadness, love, passion, death, romeo and juliet, shakespeare
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Thank you for your time,
Liber

Kazbek
Posts: 1215
Joined: April 24th, 2019, 12:06 pm

Post by Kazbek » August 2nd, 2020, 4:20 pm

Liber wrote:
August 2nd, 2020, 2:36 pm
Here's my attempt at "Romeo and Juliet" - pardon: "Mariotto e Giannozza".
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Mariotto e Giannozza, Novella XXXIII del Novellino, di Masuccio Salernitano (1410–1475)
Text URL: https://archive.org/details/bub_gb_21dCU4chVzoC/page/n419/mode/2up
Duration: 26:32
MP3 URL: https://librivox.org/uploads/toddhw/msw026_mariottoegiannozza_masucciosalernitano_le_128kb.mp3
Link to author on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Masuccio_Salernitano
Key Words: multilingual, italian, novellino, masuccio salernitano, romantic, tragedy, sadness, love, passion, death, romeo and juliet, shakespeare
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Thank you for your time,
Liber
Thank you, Liber!

Sonia, the author is not in the catalog.

Michael

Liber
Posts: 97
Joined: May 26th, 2020, 5:50 am

Post by Liber » August 2nd, 2020, 7:19 pm

Thank you, Michael,

I have also attempted 1 Corintians 13.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

"Ad Corinthios Epistula Prima", Pauli Apostoli (alias Sauli Tarsensis) et Sōsthénis a Corinthō, Caput Tertiumdecimum (1 Cor 13)
Text URL: https://archive.org/details/NovumTestamentumIuxtaGraecorumLectionemExEmendatioribusExemplaribusVet/page/n365/mode/2up
Duration: 2:48
Link to Author 1 on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_the_Apostle
Link to Author 2 on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sosthenes
Link to work on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1_Corinthians_13
MP3 URL: https://librivox.org/uploads/toddhw/msw026_vulgataepistula1cor13_saulsosthenes_le_128kb.mp3
Keywords: multilingual, latin, vulgata, bible, new testament, first epistle to the corinthians, 1 Cor 13, laus caritati, fides, spes, caritas, agape, saul tarsensis, paulus, paul the apostle, sosthenes, religion, mysticism, christianity
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Note that I have attempted a Latin disclaimer:
  • "pro LibriVox puncto org" at the beginning;
  • "Haec incisio sonora et vocalis in dominio publico est" at the end (though I guess "vocalis" should be enough for legal purposes).
Thank you for your time,
Liber

Kazbek
Posts: 1215
Joined: April 24th, 2019, 12:06 pm

Post by Kazbek » August 2nd, 2020, 8:10 pm

Liber wrote:
August 2nd, 2020, 7:19 pm

I have also attempted 1 Corintians 13.
Oh, interesting, I wasn't aware that Erasmus published an edition that included the Vulgate. Did you read from Erasmus' translation or the Vulgate? We catalog Bible recordings with the name of the version (e.g., BIBLIA SACRA VULGATA) being used in the author field, which will allow us to dodge the Sosthenes question. :)

I'll hold off putting this in the MW, until Sonia knows which column to use for PL.

Our Latin projects have used a full intro of the form Haec est transcriptio vocis a societate Librivoce facta. Omnia quae hic conservantur bono publico usui sunt, if you want to use that for inspiration, though you don't have to. I love the ablative case on the URL. :mrgreen:

Added: since the two versions are different from the first verse, I went ahead and checked your recording. Sounds like the Vulgate. Putting it in the MW.
Added #2: oh, and now I see that you mentioned the version in a couple of places. Oh, well, at least I've enjoyed comparing the versions. :D

Michael

Liber
Posts: 97
Joined: May 26th, 2020, 5:50 am

Post by Liber » August 2nd, 2020, 8:45 pm

Kazbek wrote:
August 2nd, 2020, 8:10 pm
Oh, interesting, I wasn't aware that Erasmus published an edition that included the Vulgate. Did you read from Erasmus' translation or the Vulgate? We catalog Bible recordings with the name of the version (e.g., BIBLIA SACRA VULGATA) being used in the author field, which will allow us to dodge the Sosthenes question. :)
From the Vulgate, the third column - I am actually tempted to record Erasmus' translation as well.
I have attributed the text to Paul and Sosthenes just for the record :-)
Cataloging with BIBLIA SACRA VULGATA is OK for me :-)
Kazbek wrote:
August 2nd, 2020, 8:10 pm
Our Latin projects have used a full intro of the form Haec est transcriptio vocis a societate Librivoce facta. Omnia quae hic conservantur bono publico usui sunt, if you want to use that for inspiration, though you don't have to. I love the ablative case on the URL. :mrgreen:
Thank you for that, I will keep that in mind - perhaps some disclaimers could be added at the page https://wiki.librivox.org/index.php?title=LibriVox_disclaimer.

Here I made a number of choices that are potentially controversial. First of all "pro LibriVox pūncto org" was supposed to preserve the address and the "advantage complement" (pro + ablative ~ for, on behalf of). Then I have chosen to record the date as "die tertio mensis Augusti anno bis millesimo vicesimo", mostly, I hope, for the sake of clarity. Then I have chosen "incisio" as a translation of "recording", qualifying it as "sonora et vocalis", because otherwise "incisio" could be equivocal (although "vocalis" should be enough as "vox" includes sounds). Also, I think that, legally, "dominium publicum" should be well established. :-)
I hope this is OK.

Liber

Kazbek
Posts: 1215
Joined: April 24th, 2019, 12:06 pm

Post by Kazbek » August 2nd, 2020, 9:05 pm

Liber wrote:
August 2nd, 2020, 8:45 pm
Thank you for that, I will keep that in mind - perhaps some disclaimers could be added at the page https://wiki.librivox.org/index.php?title=LibriVox_disclaimer.
Good idea. Added.
Also, I think that, legally, "dominium publicum" should be well established. :-)
Hmm, the term does appear in Roman Law, but it seems that when it was used in Latin legal works it meant something closer to eminent domain, e.g.: "Dominium publicum definiri potest: facultas quae convenit Reipublicæ disponendi de bonis subditorum, sic exigente bono publico."

https://books.google.com/books?id=AO9FAAAAcAAJ&pg=PA198

Ah, the discussions you get into at LV... :lol:

Michael

Kitty
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 23870
Joined: March 28th, 2014, 5:57 am

Post by Kitty » August 3rd, 2020, 10:11 am

Liber wrote:
August 2nd, 2020, 2:36 pm
Here's my attempt at "Romeo and Juliet" - pardon: "Mariotto e Giannozza".
Mariotto e Giannozza, Novella XXXIII del Novellino, di Masuccio Salernitano (1410–1475)
Text URL: https://archive.org/details/bub_gb_21dCU4chVzoC/page/n419/mode/2up
Duration: 26:32
MP3 URL: https://librivox.org/uploads/toddhw/msw026_mariottoegiannozza_masucciosalernitano_le_128kb.mp3
super, thank you Liber, this is an excellent addition to our collection. Yes I guess the topic of R&J is quite famous, even before Shakespeare times already. The whole narration was flawless, so PL ok :thumbs: Very agreeable to listen to.

I'll add the author to the catalogue soon !

Sonia

Kitty
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 23870
Joined: March 28th, 2014, 5:57 am

Post by Kitty » August 3rd, 2020, 10:13 am

Liber wrote:
August 2nd, 2020, 7:19 pm
I have also attempted 1 Corintians 13.
"Ad Corinthios Epistula Prima", Pauli Apostoli (alias Sauli Tarsensis) et Sōsthénis a Corinthō, Caput Tertiumdecimum (1 Cor 13)
Text URL: https://archive.org/details/NovumTestamentumIuxtaGraecorumLectionemExEmendatioribusExemplaribusVet/page/n365/mode/2up
Duration: 2:48
interesting, I never heard the LV disclaimer in Latin before :clap: thank you, and this reading sounded very mystical. I think you used a few echos in some sentences, it's an almost uncanny quality. But it makes for a lot of charm and atmosphere, I like it. :thumbs: Also PL ok.

Great additions.

Sonia

Liber
Posts: 97
Joined: May 26th, 2020, 5:50 am

Post by Liber » August 3rd, 2020, 3:51 pm

Hi Sonia and Michael,

Thank you for your support. Everytime I submit a file I obsess about a million ways I could have done it differently, so thank you for the kind words, they are very much appreciated. :D

And thank you, Michael, for adding the Latin disclaimer to the wiki page :-)
___

Mariotto e Giannozza (~1475) is apparently the first known "proto" version of what would have become Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, passing through Luigi da Porto (~1524), Matteo Bandello (~1554), and a few others. Masuccio's syntax is either too elaborate, too "latineggiante" ("latinising"?), or just a little bit unsteady, thus producing weird effects –– I hope the listener will be able to follow.
___

In the second file I have used a few effects with Audacity (by the way, thank you for encouraging me to explore those).

I have added a few very brief echos, namely at "videmus nunc per speculum in ænigmate", "cognoscam sicut et cognitus sum", and "est caritas", as I felt these were the passages where the true meaning of the text can be more fully appreciated. (In my opinion, the authors were trying to communicate a mystical enlightenment –– or fantasy? –– of being one with God. Centuries after, Meister Eckhart would have put it as "The eye with which I see God is the same with which God sees me. My eye and God's eye is one eye, and one sight, and one knowledge, and one love." I have imagined that looking with your own eye into your own eye, wherein you see God and God sees you, and demarcation lines fade and vanish, and you and God are one, would be accompanied by an echo of vibrations inside, such that you would find yourself identifying with… the Logos? :9: )

Thank you again for your time and feedback,
Liber

Kazbek
Posts: 1215
Joined: April 24th, 2019, 12:06 pm

Post by Kazbek » August 3rd, 2020, 5:16 pm

Liber wrote:
August 3rd, 2020, 3:51 pm
Masuccio's syntax is either too elaborate, too "latineggiante" ("latinising"?), or just a little bit unsteady, thus producing weird effects –– I hope the listener will be able to follow.
I generally find old Italian prose easier to follow by ear than on with the eye, because intonation serves as a guide to the syntax. I look forward to hearing this one! I haven't read anything from Il Novellino yet.

Michael

Sandyreads97
Posts: 13
Joined: July 24th, 2020, 7:38 am

Post by Sandyreads97 » Yesterday, 6:54 am

Kazbek wrote:
August 1st, 2020, 7:58 am
Sandyreads97 wrote:
August 1st, 2020, 7:23 am
Hello! Just found this novel in my garage, so figured I'd record it!

Title: Kamizelka
Author: Boleslaw Prus

Link to author on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boles%C5%82aw_Prus
Link to title on Wikipedia :https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Waistcoat

Number of sections (files) this project will have: 1
Does the project have an introduction or preface [y/n]: No
Original publication date (if known): 1882

Recording:
https://librivox.org/uploads/toddhw/msw026_[kamizelka]_[prus]_[sf]_128kb.mp3
Hello, and thanks for your contribution! Unfortunately, in order to ensure that the recording is in the public domain in the US, where our servers are located, we need to verify not only the original publication date of the work, but also the publication date of the edition you read from. We can use a scan where the title page shows a publication year of 1924 or earlier, or a text from gutenberg.org, or a text that is available in FullView at HathiTrust.org. I did a quick search and found only one edition of this story that we can use:

https://polona.pl/item/kamizelka-michalko,NzI1NTM3MTQ/4/#info:metadata

It sounds like you read from a physical book. If its title page shows a year of 1924 or earlier, we'll need to have an image of the title page. Otherwise, we'll have to ask you to compare your reading to a PD edition and change any discrepancies to match that edition, or else record the text again from a PD edition. Don't hesitate to ask us about PD status of a text you're planning to use before recording it, so as to avoid extra efforts like these.

A couple of other things:

Since this seems to be your first contribution, please let me know under what name (real or nickname) you would like to be credited in the catalog. We can also include a link to your personal website or blog, if you have one.

The filename should omit the square brackets: msw026_kamizelka_prus_sf_128kb.mp3

Thanks!
Michael
Hello!

Thank you for the reply, I want to be called Sandyreads97, as my nickname.

I have looked at the PD version and it was basically the same, apart from few words that I have changed in the recording. This is the changed version. Hope it works!


https://librivox.org/uploads/toddhw/msw026_kamizelka_prus_sf_128kb.mp3



Thank you,
Sandy

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