[GREEK] The Imitation of Christ

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pella
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Post by pella » January 23rd, 2009, 1:40 am

I would like to start recording the Imitation of Christ by Thomas a Kempis translated into Greek . I searched on the internet but I couldn't find a Greek version. I have a Greek version dated to 1900 can I use it ?

Hokuspokus
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Post by Hokuspokus » January 23rd, 2009, 3:20 am

Hi pella,

a hard copy from 1900 is fine to use for a solo.
But before you start I'd suggest to check the year of translator's death and see if it is OK for you to use. (Greek copyright ends 70 years after the authors /translators death, I think.)

If this is OK too, please get the template for soloist (here => http://librivox.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=13513)
edit your first post and fill in all details.

pella
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Post by pella » January 23rd, 2009, 1:19 pm

it was finally translated into Greek in 1902 By archbishop Averkios Lampires but so far I wasn't able to find the date of his death. However the date of Thomas a Kempis death I discovered which was in 1471 . is that okey ?or shall I search more for the date of death of archbishop Averkios ?
Last edited by pella on January 24th, 2009, 7:30 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by Hokuspokus » January 24th, 2009, 1:05 am

Better find out the date of translator's death.
He might have died before 1939. Then everything is OK. But if he died in or after 1939 the translation is still under copyright in Greece and you would break the copyright law in your country.

Google knows nothing about the translator, but you could ask your local library for help or advice.

As I am in Germany and we have the same copyright (author's death +70 years), I often was in the same situation. OK in Ger, not OK in the US or the other way round. I cross my fingers.

ezwa
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Post by ezwa » January 25th, 2009, 12:40 am

Hi Pella,

If you use a hard copy (and if everything else is cleared, for you, about translator's death,...), we'd ask that you send a scanned or photographed copy of the first page(s) of the book, the one(s) that mention the title, date of publication and copyright.
Ezwa

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lezer
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Post by lezer » March 16th, 2009, 1:09 pm

Hi pella,
I've moved this thread to Book Suggestions for the time being, in a cleaning-out of the New Projects Launch Pad.
Anna

JWMcCalvin
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Post by JWMcCalvin » March 17th, 2009, 11:42 pm

Virtually none of the following will do much good with respect to whether it's ok to do a reading of this book, but I feel led to share it any way.

First, I did an extensive search for archbishop Averkios Lampire, not only where he might have been found on the Net, but within what small quantity of reference sources I have. He is nowhere to be found; there isn't any mention of him anywhere I've looked, except one place, to be mentioned later. Ask.com asked me if I meant 'Averikos Vampire.' I didn't, but it does suggest that if anyone could find The Imitation of Christ translated into Greek by a vampire--or indeed, any book by a vampire--there's a good chance that it would be in public domain, no matter how recently or long ago it was done; issues of 'when did he die?' are irrelevant in the case of vampires: since, as we know, vampires are always undead. As HP Lovecraft wrote (in another context), 'That is not dead which can eternal lie.'

In the absence of solid information about the archbishop himself, ones only recourse is to sheer guesswork.

The one reference I was able to find about Averkios Lampires was in books.google, where he is credited with the translation of Kempis's book, as Peri mimeseos Iesou Christou: vivlia tessara. The date of said publication is given as 1862. I could be wrong, of course, but it makes more sense to me that the 1902 book under discussion was a reprint of the 1862 work, than that another man named Arkevios Lampires also became an archbishop and then did another translation of Imitation of Christ in Greek.

Needless to say, of course, this still doesn't solve the issue: when did archbishop Lampires die? We are back to speculating. Let's agree that the translation was published in 1862. One assumes that he was an archbishop at the time. When did he become an archbishop? Obviously, none of us knows; however, 'archbishop' is not a hereditary title: he was not born an archbishop or become one as a small child. He had to grow up, enter the priesthood--possibly, but not certainly, in the Greek Orthodox Church. I know nothing whatsoever about how long it took for anyone to achieve the status of archbishop. but I just can't help suspecting that if Lampires' age had been significantly young, there'd be more references to him as 'Youngest person ever to be appointed archbishop,' if nothing else. Of course, it's still a mere guess if we supposed he was at least 21 years of age at the time (born 1841)--or to say that he translated Peri mimeseos Iesou Christou at that age (and held off presenting it for publication until he became archbishop). But suppose he was and/or did. Remember, our criterion is '1939.' Here is a handy chart:

If AL was 21 in 1862, he would have been 98 in 1939
If AL was 31 in 1862, he would have been 108 in 1939
If AL was 41 in 1862, he would have been 118 in 1939

Therefore, the most reasonable conclusion which can be reached is,
unless Averkios Lampires lived to an extremely ripe old age, there is a better-than-average possibility that he died before 1939.

Well, I said it wouldn't do much good

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