Any Russian-speaking readers around?

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tovarisch
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Post by tovarisch » March 15th, 2013, 8:39 am

Praeivis wrote:Russian?? :hmm: I don't know... I prefer French. But if you could propose something really worthy I don't know... Maybe... But I am not sure :hmm:

P.S. Sorry, but I don't write English at all.
I could swear my French was nowhere :| , but if you say that you don't write English, then my French must be improving - I understand every word in your post 8-)

To answer your very first question: yes, Russian! Let's! Обязательно! I just recently joined with the idea in mind to expand the collection of Russian books on LV. I'll do what I can, given that time is mostly what's needed for this, and that's the only real limitation. I think it of utmost importance to make all literary works as available as possible, in all languages (French, too :wink:).

Happy recording!

tovarisch
tovarisch
  • reality prompts me to scale down my reading, sorry to say
    to PLers: do correct my pronunciation please

kwdavids
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Post by kwdavids » March 17th, 2013, 6:30 pm

The Russian fabulist Krilov translated some of Aesop's fables into Russian as well as having written many of his own. I'm currently doing a project of a selection of them in English.

viewtopic.php?t=45109

There is an immense hoard of Russian-texts at the Fundamental Digital Library of Russian Literature and Folklore. Here is their index of Authors (but not Krilov):

http://feb-web.ru/feben/feb/atindex/atindex.htm
Cori wrote:I don't speak a word of Russian. But, any chance you could find some children's stories..? It would be especially neat to have Aesop's Fables, since we have those in several languages already ... means it's easier for people to get multi-lingual. :D

I totally support your doing the Russian Classics, too ... it's cool that they're available in a language I can understand, but I think it'd be amazing to have them in their original language too.
Kevin
At the last moment, I decided not to read this section in my "talk like a pirate" voice.

ShiNeko
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Post by ShiNeko » June 5th, 2013, 11:16 am

Hello!
I'm Anastasia. I'm new here. I'd really like to read books in Russian for LibriVox. I want to try doing solo projects at first.
If I want to record Demon by Lermontov where do I need to write that I'm going to do and actually doing it?
Of course after I make 1-minute-test.

Thanks,
Anastasia
~Nastya
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TriciaG
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Post by TriciaG » June 5th, 2013, 11:48 am

Welcome!

As a soloist, you're on your own - you do not have someone coordinating the project for you, or updating the sections in the Magic Window. So it is better to first do at least a couple sections in group projects first. (Also, new readers are very surprised at how much time it takes to record a chapter, so doing something smaller than a book will help you get the idea of how much work this is.)

I would suggest, after your test recording, to submit something to the multilingual short works collection. This can be a poem, a short story (less than an hour), etc. and will help you understand what is involved in recording. :)

hrotgar
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Post by hrotgar » December 29th, 2013, 2:57 am

No I can not think of reading Russian myself.

Still I took home some of the Russian texts and found that, at least in the beginning, they went a bit too fast for me.

I know, I can use Audacity to slow down the reading but that is a bit of cheating.

My Russian teacher was a born Russian and he did admire a russian news reader called Levitan.

I have a feeling that Levitan had greatly influenced his style when teaching Russian to us.

He had a very nice and clear pronounciation and people in Russia have often said that I speak a beautiful

russian language. Perhaps they are only polite but I think there might be something in it.

Beatiful might my russioan be, perhaps, but certainly rather limited, because I started learning Russian when I was at the

age of about 25-30, I do not remember exactly when.

So when you read russian texts, please keep in mind that your readers/listeners may be slow-witted foreigners and please

try to read reasonably clearly and slowly like the legendary Levitan.

This is meant as a positive hint. 12 Chairs Ilf Petrov might be a nice book if it is not too fresh.

kwdavids
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Post by kwdavids » January 6th, 2014, 2:45 pm

hrotgar wrote: My Russian teacher was a born Russian and he did admire a russian news reader called Levitan.
When I visited Russia last year, people were still mentioning Levitan. Here is a photo of his grave marker that I took in Moscow.

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Yuri_Borisovich_Levitan.JPG
Kevin
At the last moment, I decided not to read this section in my "talk like a pirate" voice.

hrotgar
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Post by hrotgar » January 11th, 2014, 11:44 am

Levitan looks a bit like my father who died in 1940.

Nice to see a portrait of Levitan.

Thenks

Xenium5
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Post by Xenium5 » January 19th, 2014, 1:51 pm

hrotgar wrote: 12 Chairs Ilf Petrov might be a nice book if it is not too fresh.
I presume this indeed wonderfull novel hasn't been in the public domain yet :(
Btw, i am a novice here and want to contribute to the Russian part of the catalogue. It is recommended to try the forces with the collaborative work, so, are there any Russian texts to join?
Otherwise i suggest starting some Pushkin's stories - i am dreaming of reading "Повести Белкина" - http://az.lib.ru/p/pushkin_a_s/text_0422.shtml. Any volunteers to do it together?
Xenia

ShiNeko
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Post by ShiNeko » January 19th, 2014, 2:25 pm

Xenium5 wrote:
hrotgar wrote: 12 Chairs Ilf Petrov might be a nice book if it is not too fresh.
I presume this indeed wonderfull novel hasn't been in the public domain yet :(
Btw, i am a novice here and want to contribute to the Russian part of the catalogue. It is recommended to try the forces with the collaborative work, so, are there any Russian texts to join?
Otherwise i suggest starting some Pushkin's stories - i am dreaming of reading "Повести Белкина" - http://az.lib.ru/p/pushkin_a_s/text_0422.shtml. Any volunteers to do it together?
It is not (Petrov is the reason) indeed but will be in 2017.
There are no Russian collaborative projects 'cause there are few Russian-speaking people. But if you really do want to do it I can help you to BC and find some other readers who maybe will take part. If no in the end we can record it ourself.
~Nastya
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Cori
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Post by Cori » January 19th, 2014, 2:47 pm

Ah, not 2017, but 2023, in the US. Books published outside the US before 196?something simply have a blanket 95 years copyright assigned. For people in Europe, Russia, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and most other places ... both authors are already in the public domain based on when they died.
There's honestly no such thing as a stupid question -- but I'm afraid I can't rule out giving a stupid answer : : To Posterity and Beyond!

ShiNeko
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Post by ShiNeko » January 19th, 2014, 3:41 pm

Cori wrote:Ah, not 2017, but 2023, in the US. Books published outside the US before 196?something simply have a blanket 95 years copyright assigned. For people in Europe, Russia, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and most other places ... both authors are already in the public domain based on when they died.
Well, not in the PD in near future anyway. Btw can't tell why but Petrov is not in the PD in Russia yet.

I can't get why people always need to do such difficult systems. Law is just too complicated for me. :? Thanks for telling, Cori.
~Nastya
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Xenium5
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Post by Xenium5 » January 28th, 2014, 12:52 pm

ShiNeko wrote:
Cori wrote:Ah, not 2017, but 2023, in the US. Books published outside the US before 196?something simply have a blanket 95 years copyright assigned. For people in Europe, Russia, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and most other places ... both authors are already in the public domain based on when they died.
Russian low suggests that all works of literature goes to PD after 70 years after author's death.
Xenia

Xenium5
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Post by Xenium5 » January 28th, 2014, 12:56 pm

ShiNeko wrote: But if you really do want to do it I can help you to BC and find some other readers who maybe will take part. If no in the end we can record it ourself.
Dear Nastya, I will appreciate your help as BC because I am novice here and am not sure that could manage with all the tasks, though I am not fear to read the book solo. I just doubt whether I am able to find proof-listener for myself and all coordination work.

Xenia
Xenia

ShiNeko
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Post by ShiNeko » January 28th, 2014, 1:00 pm

Xenium5 wrote: Russian low suggests that all works of literature goes to PD after 70 years after author's death.
Yes, but LibriVox situates in the USA. So we need to follow laws of the USA.
Last edited by ShiNeko on January 31st, 2014, 1:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.
~Nastya
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ShiNeko
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Post by ShiNeko » January 28th, 2014, 1:08 pm

Xenium5 wrote:
ShiNeko wrote: But if you really do want to do it I can help you to BC and find some other readers who maybe will take part. If no in the end we can record it ourself.
Dear Nastya, I will appreciate your help as BC because I am novice here and am not sure that could manage with all the tasks, though I am not fear to read the book solo. I just doubt whether I am able to find proof-listener for myself and all coordination work.
I can aways be a PLer. If you do solo you usually are BC yourself. BCing a solo project is not difficult as you don't need contact with other readers like in a collaborative project. Usually we suggest to take part in some collaborative projects to get some experience in recording before making solo. But there are readers who begin with solo. It is up to you decide. :)
~Nastya
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