Any Russian-speaking readers around?

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Cori
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Post by Cori » June 22nd, 2008, 3:30 am

Also, you don't have to restrict yourselves to only one thing! How about setting up a small range ... mebbe a Russian Poetry Collection Vol. 001, the Aesops, and then something literary but not immense.

A poetry collection, even if you make it 20 poems long (but 10 might be better), should fill relatively quickly with 4 of you reading (and I think asy might contribute, I think she's a Russian-speaker, and there's bound to be others lurking.) And it's a good way to lure in new folks, too. The fables are fun between other projects and another good place for newcomers to start ... and then the "main" book project will be ongoing and take a while, but after all, there's no race here. So many books are waiting patiently for our voices.
There's honestly no such thing as a stupid question -- but I'm afraid I can't rule out giving a stupid answer : : To Posterity and Beyond!

ksushi
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Post by ksushi » June 24th, 2008, 5:57 pm

Hi
I'm new here and have never recorded anything, but I love LibriVox (I'm currently listening to Mansfield Park) and I suddenly decided I wanted to try recording something myself.
I'm a native Russian speaker currently living in the US and I was thrilled to see the call for Russian-speaking readers. I realized however, that my favorite books are rather long...

Here are the two of my favorite:

Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy (I'd say - the absolute favorite)
and
Crime and Punishment by Dostoeyvskij

Does anyone have any suggestions or/and words of encouragement about how I should proceed?

Also - I'm not very fond of my voice (at least on the voice mail :)) - I heard it's pretty common... Any hints on how to start liking your own voice better? :)

Thank you so much!

--- Ksusha.

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Post by PaulW » June 24th, 2008, 11:38 pm

ksushi wrote:Hi
I'm new here and have never recorded anything, but I love LibriVox (I'm currently listening to Mansfield Park) and I suddenly decided I wanted to try recording something myself.
You're not the first one who's done that. :D Our not-so-subliminal advertising in the disclaimer does that to people, sometimes.
I'm a native Russian speaker currently living in the US and I was thrilled to see the call for Russian-speaking readers. I realized however, that my favorite books are rather long...

Here are the two of my favorite:

Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy (I'd say - the absolute favorite)
and
Crime and Punishment by Dostoeyvskij
We have an English version of Crime and Punishment goinng on in this thread. It still has several chapters available for reading, and you could go ahead and claim one of them, but I'd suggest starting with something a little bit shorter...maybe adding a public domain poem in Russion to the Multilingual Poetry collection, or trying the Weekly poetry project...both of which can be found in Readers Wanted: Short Works.

We also generally ask new readers to submit a test recording, just to make sure there are no problems with their recording setup. Instructions can be found in the How to Record guide. In fact you might want to check out all of the Guides for Listeners & Volunteers...they all have loads of useful information.
Does anyone have any suggestions or/and words of encouragement about how I should proceed?

Also - I'm not very fond of my voice (at least on the voice mail :)) - I heard it's pretty common... Any hints on how to start liking your own voice better? :)

Thank you so much!

--- Ksusha.
In addition to the Guides I mentioned before, check out the What if I Suck? thread and the Making your recording sound great thread.

Welcome to Librivox, Ksusha,and if you have any questions, just ask...you'll have seveal friendly people falling all over themselves to help. And, have fun! :D
Paul
[b]DPL: [url=http://librivox.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=12852]Brigands of the Moon[/url]; [url=http://librivox.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=13151]Brain Twister[/url][/b]

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Post by Kikisaulite » June 25th, 2008, 1:44 am

Hi, Ksusha and all other Russian speaking Librivoxers!

Now that here are several of us, I think it's time to set up a group recording in Russian. I propose we start with Aesops Fables in Russian for the beginning and see how we get along with them. And if everything goes well, there will of course be other projects as well.

I will set up the Aesops Fables project in next few days - look out for it in Readers Wanted forum. I will also post a note here, giving the link, when the project is up and ready for claims. But - I repeat - it could take a day or two.

Greetings,
Kristine.
Keep your mind here and now, where it belongs.

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Post by Natalya_Zhurkova » June 25th, 2008, 7:46 am

hello, I'm glad to find this topic... I can do Russian (when I learn and try how to record), of course, first something short, than... well, my dreams were to record "Alye parusa" - "Scarlet Sails" by Gryn and "Master and Margarita" Bulghakov...
these all are dreams and now I'm trying to download audacity and try my mic... I've tried already to record something before - but the quality was awful... and I'm glad to find this topic with people, who can give instructions in Russian (don't tell anybody, that I'm an English teacher:)

And big thousands Thank You to all, who started and is going on with this project!
Image

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Post by Kikisaulite » June 26th, 2008, 4:02 am

Hello, Natalya!!
Welcome to Librivox and if you have any questions, don't hesitate to ask!

I would also love to record "Master i Margarita", and indeed almost everyone would , but it is alas! not PD, as it was written 1928 and published only 1966 for the first time. :( But - there are many other nice works to record anyway.

Greetings,
Kristine.
Keep your mind here and now, where it belongs.

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Post by Kikisaulite » June 27th, 2008, 9:26 am

Dear Russian-speaking librivoxers!!!

The Aesops Fables in Russian project is now all set up and ready for your claims here:

http://librivox.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=14539



Greetings,
Kristine.
Keep your mind here and now, where it belongs.

Natalya_Zhurkova
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Post by Natalya_Zhurkova » June 28th, 2008, 2:36 am

Kristine,
thank you for answer and for starting a new thread for Aesops fables.
I'm learning to record now. And there is such a noise and the recording is too quiet :roll:
I know, I'm not the first who has such problems, but I'm not always good with new programms, it always takes some time, to get everything clear.
I'm trying, as soon I get a sutisfactory result :arrow: I'll claim for fables.

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Post by suburbanbanshee » June 30th, 2008, 9:55 am

Re: copyright status of Master and Margarita

It's an interesting problem. Under US copyright law, anything that Bulgakov wrote (published or unpublished) would normally come into the public domain at the same time as the works of all the other people who died in 1940. However, Master i Margarita was apparently finished by Bulgakov's wife Yelena Shilovskaya, so I think it falls under the rules for co-written works. So it won't go public domain until writers with her death date go public domain.

Also, editing or translating a book creates a slightly different version of the work, that can have its own copyright. I think dates of foreign publication can also affect things, but I'm not clear on that.

So Master i Margarita won't be public domain in the US for a long time.

OTOH, in the US, anything that he wrote before 1923 is public domain now; and everything he wrote that was not co-written or edited later will be public domain in 2011. So in the US, there will probably soon be renewed interest in Bulgakov's other works.

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Post by Kikisaulite » June 30th, 2008, 10:32 am

Thank you, Suburbanbanshee, for the explicit insight into Copyright concerning Bulgakov. It's very helpful indeed.

I must admit that I personally am not very fond of other his works, though I admire Master i Margarita. But if someone is interested, here is the full bibliography of Bulgakov's works, both English translations and Russian originals : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bibliography_of_Mikhail_Bulgakov
Keep your mind here and now, where it belongs.

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Post by Cori » June 30th, 2008, 1:39 pm

suburbanbanshee wrote:Re: copyright status of Master and Margarita

OTOH, in the US, anything that he wrote before 1923 is public domain now; and everything he wrote that was not co-written or edited later will be public domain in 2011. So in the US, there will probably soon be renewed interest in Bulgakov's other works.
Noooo ... I'm afraid not -- the laws for books first published outside the US between 1923 and 1963 are a bit quirky, but my basic understanding is that the rule to apply is Date-of-publication + 95years. The rule about date of author's death doesn't become relevant until after 1963. So nothing new will lapse into the US public domain until 2018.
There's honestly no such thing as a stupid question -- but I'm afraid I can't rule out giving a stupid answer : : To Posterity and Beyond!

Medved
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Post by Medved » October 12th, 2008, 4:41 am

Well, hi everybody, I've joined the community right now and Russian is my native language, so I'm open for new projects and would lovely try to make my little input in the LibriVox wonderful collection.
As every newby not dealing much with software of all kinds, I have some problems with Audacity, it being absolutely new for me, but I hope to get my bearings soon :wink:
As for the material to be recorded, of course it's obvius that to begin is better with some short poems and stories, but Natasha, I agree completely that it would be great to have Alexander Grin's works, especially "Алые паруса", here.

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Post by Leni » October 13th, 2008, 2:13 pm

Hello to any Russian speakers that might be following this thread.

I'm checking the feasibility of recording a collection of translations of Edgar Alan Poe's Raven in many languages (the project - or actually the planning - is going on in this thread: http://librivox.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=16010&start=15.

I have found in the Edgar Alan Poe Society website that there is a Russian translation in PD (from 1878 by Konstantin Balmont). However, I was unable to find that or any other Russian translations due to the fact I can't read a word in Russian. :lol:

So, if anyone would like to support the idea, reading or even just checking the PD'ness of any translations, it'd be much appreciated!

Thanks!

P.S. I am in the same situation regarding a Hungarian translation and a Dutch translation, so if anyone could check those too... :oops: )
Leni
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Post by jrroberts » November 2nd, 2008, 2:04 am

Hey folks! I'm new to this forum. I stumbled on it this evening while looking for mp3 recordings of Wallace Stevens' work, and was very pleasantly surprised.

At any rate, I'm not really sure how to go about this. But I read the above posts and am extremely interested in reading for the [i]Aesop's Fables[/i] project. I was wondering if anybody would be interested in another project:

How about a dual-language collection of some of the works of Russia's foremost Modernist poets? My personal favorites are Mayakovsky and Akhmatova, but we could touch upon all the major movements--Symbolism, Acmeism, Futurism, etc. Other names that jump to mind are Bryusov, Blok, Bely, Gumilev, Pasternak, and Kruschenykh. There's more, of course. What do you guys think?

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Post by Illiterati » November 3rd, 2008, 9:24 am

Wonderful idea, but we will run into a lot of copyright problems here. I am myself deeply and hopelessly interested in some of the names on your list (Akhmatova, Tsvetayeva, Pasternak) but they are all out of reach for most people here since they died in 1966, 1941 and 1960, just to give an idea. The Copyright in most countries is death +50 years, death +70 in the EU.

The death +xx years concerns also the translators of the works into English.

The earlier ones you mentioned are worth checking out, however.

What we would need to find are PD translations of the work, preferably published before 1923 in the USA. I will try to look into this thing and draw some sort of general first roundup on my findings.

Great taste you have there!

I
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