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Plays and other dramatic works
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SonOfTheExiles
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Post by SonOfTheExiles » July 25th, 2020, 1:07 am

While I realise that you are up to your ears in multitudinous plays at the moment, Todd, I thought I'd share news of this play that I've just found with you for when the floodwaters go down a few inches. The leading man is an Australian in London. :mrgreen:

https://archive.org/details/wallsofjerichopl00sutriala/mode/1up

It's called "The Walls of Jericho", but it is not a religious play, quite the contrary.

Here is a summary...

"In "The Walls of Jericho" the author, Mr. Alfred Sutro, has exposed with no light hand the foibles, follies and excesses of that section of modern society known as the "Smart Set." Here are men and women possessing wealth, and titles, and the power of usefulness, and who only turn their time, talents and wealth to the pursuit of pleasure and degradation, to senseless extravagance, to gambling and scandalising and flirting, and worse!

Among the members of this set to whom Mr. Sutro presents us are an odious and mercenary aristocratic father, a Duchess who cheats at bridge, a libertine of Mayfair who forcibly embraces another man's wife within call of the servants, and young men and women - deceitful, backbiting, cynical - who scatter at large and for all ears epigrams and personal remarks in deplorable taste. All of which is warrant enough for the blast of Joshua's trumpets, and not altogether a pleasing or an instructive picture to gaze upon. But the author has also provided something in the form of a wholesome corrective. His story, which I will now briefly relate, provides a useful moral.

Jack Frobisher, by sheep-farming in Queensland, has amassed a huge fortune, and with it, and all the innocence of the free and open life he has been accustomed to, he comes to London - the modern Jericho - and marries the Lady Alethea, daughter of the impecunious Marquis of Steventon. Very soon his wife begins to drift the way of her set, gambling, dancing and flirting; the husband, bored and weary, following her with charming docility, from house to house. Frobisher was a strong man in Queensland, and had, in fact, gained for himself the name of "Fighting Jack." Now in London he is amazed to find that he is impotent to stem the current that already threatens to carry him off his feet. His wife's relations, with a certain Harry Dallas, have gone to the length not merely of arousing his jealousy, but also of encouraging Dallas to declare his passion, although it should be said that Lady Alethea draws back at once, for in her heart of hearts and beneath the fashionable frivolity there dwells an honest love for her husband.

In due course serious friction arises, partly over Dallas, and more acutely over Lady Alethea's young brother, Max, who with disastrous results has taken advantage of a young lady occupying the position of companion in Lord Steventon's house. Jack Frobisher insists that the lad shall marry the girl, a step which Max readily consents to take. But the family pride is up in arms against it, and Jack's persistence only serves to render his wife the more angry.

Meanwhile, Frobisher's oldest and dearest chum, Hankey Bannister, who is also a millionaire from Queensland, appears on the scene, and falls in love with Lady Lucy, Alethea's young sister. Now Lucy is about as "good" as the rest of the family, and when she cynically announces her intention of spreading a net for the capture of her unsophisticated suitor, it is Frobisher's misfortune to again arouse his wife's wrath by opening his friend's eyes to the truth.

At last there comes a day when the inevitable happens and brings about the final rupture between man and wife. Harry Dallas has just revealed himself in his true colours, and has unsuccessfully struggled to take Lady Alethea in his arms, when Jack Frobisher unexpectedly enters the room and sees more than enough to justify his suspicions. Instantly the milk and water "husband" of London is transformed into "Fighting Jack" of Queensland. It is Jack Frobisher who, moved now to action, takes up the trumpet and blows a blast which brings down the walls of modern Jericho, or rather that particular portion of the wall in which his own dwelling is set. He makes short work of Dallas. He meets and makes yet shorter work of his wicked old father-in-law. And then he meets his wife, and empties out upon her the vials of his wrath. "I've had enough," he shouts, "of these companions of yours - these wretched, sexless women who do nothing but flirt and gamble - these childless wives who grudge the time that it costs them, to bring a baby into the world. I've had enough of their brainless, indecent talk, where everything good is turned into ridicule, and each word has a double meaning. I've had enough of this existence of ours, in town and country, where all the men make love to their neighbours' wives. I've done with it - done with it all, and so have you."

In his anger Frobisher admits of no compromise, he will sell up forthwith and go back to a plain and wholesome life in Queensland. But Lady Alethea refuses to go with him. He has said things to her that she can never forgive. And so they separate, and the time for his sailing approaches. The child, so much neglected by its mother, is to go with the father, but an accidental meeting with his wife, who breaks down at the thought of losing her boy, moves her husband to give up the child, and he declares he will go alone. This little act of magnanimity wins Lady Alethea back to his side, and, folded in his arms, she expresses her willingness and readiness to start with him the new life in Queensland."


http://www.stagebeauty.net/th-frames.html?http&&&www.stagebeauty.net/produce/wallsj/th-wallsj.html


Cheers,
Chris
"Sorry, my tongue got in the way of my eye-tooth, and I couldn't see what I was saying..."
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alanmapstone
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Post by alanmapstone » July 25th, 2020, 2:21 am

If that is only the summary, how long is the play :hmm:
alan
the sixth age shifts into the slippered pantaloon with spectacles on nose

annise
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Post by annise » July 25th, 2020, 2:59 am

Obviously, after the summary, we wouldn't need to go to the play, would we? We already know the whole plot :D

Anne

SonOfTheExiles
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Post by SonOfTheExiles » July 25th, 2020, 3:06 am

Anything worth engineering is worth over-engineering. :wink:

Chris
"Sorry, my tongue got in the way of my eye-tooth, and I couldn't see what I was saying..."
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ToddHW
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Post by ToddHW » July 25th, 2020, 4:44 am

We have some stuff by Sutro in our catalog. including 4 short stories in the first DR Scenes and Stories collection. Biting satire, as well as I can remember. I didn't know he wrote plays. Do I really need another on my list? (Silly question - of course you do!)

Thanks, Todd

Salvationist
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Post by Salvationist » July 25th, 2020, 11:07 am

Might anyone be interested in doing "The Betrothal" by Maurice Maeterlinck? It's the sequel to "The Blue Bird" that was recorded on LibriVox four years ago. I'd love to see the rest of the story told on LibriVox. Here's the link to "The Betrothal" on Project Gutenberg: https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/34343
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wib66
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Post by wib66 » July 25th, 2020, 12:08 pm

Salvationist wrote:
July 25th, 2020, 11:07 am
Might anyone be interested in doing "The Betrothal" by Maurice Maeterlinck? It's the sequel to "The Blue Bird" that was recorded on LibriVox four years ago. I'd love to see the rest of the story told on LibriVox. Here's the link to "The Betrothal" on Project Gutenberg: https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/34343
Just had a look at this one and it certainly seems like fun to do. I will set it up and hopefully you can claim a part as there are quite a lot in this one.
Michele

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It's much better to do good in a way that no one knows anything about it. From Anna Karenina

Salvationist
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Post by Salvationist » July 25th, 2020, 12:42 pm

wib66 wrote:
July 25th, 2020, 12:08 pm
Just had a look at this one and it certainly seems like fun to do. I will set it up and hopefully you can claim a part as there are quite a lot in this one.
Thank you for offering to set this up, Michele! I'm very glad you're interested in this play. I would be glad to claim a part when it goes live. I'll be watching the launch pad. :D
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LikeManyWaters
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Post by LikeManyWaters » August 7th, 2020, 11:32 am

"The Desire for Change: A Comedy in Three Acts" by Francis Neilson

Here's another link for those who can't access google: https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/009954042

"The Impossible Philanthoropist: A Comedy in Four Acts" by Francis Neilson

"A butterfly on the wheel; a play in four acts" by Edward G. Hemmerde and Francis Neilson

Author Information: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francis_Neilson
https://openlibrary.org/authors/OL1963615A/Francis_Neilson

He has several books and plays in the PD. It looks like nothing by him is in the LV Catalog. I've only made it half way through the first one, so I can't summarize yet. Just posting them in case someone is interested...
April

“When the whole world is running towards a cliff,
he who is running in the opposite direction appears to have lost his mind.” 
– C. S. Lewis

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