Dramatic Reading (DR) Suggestions

Plays and other dramatic works
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darkfox8963
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Post by darkfox8963 » January 28th, 2010, 8:13 pm

Could somebody explain what all the prefixes in the dramatic works section mean? Like there "~FULL" "~OPEN" "OPEN" "~" Does the tilde mean something special? And is there a difference between full and readers found, and open and no prefix?

chocoholic
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Post by chocoholic » January 28th, 2010, 8:19 pm

FULL means fully cast; OPEN means there are roles available; the tilde is a new thing meaning there is no DPL signed up for that project. (It's a visual cue for people who are actively looking for projects they can DPL.) There is no difference between FULL and Readers Found, but it is common practice to leave Dramatic Works here in this forum when they are fully subscribed instead of moving them to the official Readers Found forum. (Speaking for myself only -- I much prefer to keep all the plays together in one place; it's easier to keep track of what is going on with them and easier to spot the languishing ones, etc. Some people like to move theirs, so there isn't a set standard.) Oh, and the ones with no prefix -- that's just because the BC or MC hasn't gotten around to adding it; it doesn't necessarily mean Full or Open.
Last edited by chocoholic on January 28th, 2010, 8:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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darkfox8963
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Post by darkfox8963 » January 28th, 2010, 8:21 pm

Alright, cool. Thanks. :)

Alouette
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Post by Alouette » February 4th, 2010, 12:21 am

The House of Bernarda Alba by Lorcia is a wonderful play with only women.

annise
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Post by annise » February 4th, 2010, 1:04 am

Do you have an online text link ?

Anne

deanjeffries
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Post by deanjeffries » February 4th, 2010, 2:03 am

My research shows that The House of Bernarda Alba was completed in its original Spanish in 1936. The English translations on Google.com also show copyright being held by the translator in addition the "heirs" of the author, Lorca. It doesn't seem to be available under public domain. I'm sorry.

Nullifidian
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Post by Nullifidian » February 4th, 2010, 1:43 pm

I just noticed that we don't have any recordings of Eugene O'Neill's plays.

Most of O'Neill's work is still copyrighted, but he spans the period, so many great early plays are now in the public domain. We could do Anna Christie, The Emperor Jones, Beyond the Horizon, The Hairy Ape, The First Man, The Straw, among others, plus many of his one-act plays like Ile and the Glencairn plays (Bound East for Cardiff, In the Zone, The Long Voyage Home and Moon of the Caribbees).

Is anyone else interested in his work?

wildemoose
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Post by wildemoose » February 4th, 2010, 1:56 pm

I worked on a production of The Hairy Ape last year, and the problem with both that play and The Emperor Jones is that they are not only largely in dialect, but really problematic in some of the language, which would probably be considered racist and offensive to a modern day audience. We had to do quite a bit of editing and other work on The Hairy Ape in order to get the story of the play across without causing offense; I'd argue that the original text is almost unperformable in 2010. I'd definitely support someone choosing to take these plays on, but it's not something I'd be particularly comfortable working on.

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Post by Margaret » April 16th, 2010, 7:51 pm

Once a country is habituated to liars, it takes generations to bring the truth back.
~ Gore Vidal ~

Margaret
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Post by Margaret » April 21st, 2010, 9:37 pm

I would love to see us do this: http://www.archive.org/details/betseybobbettdra00holl
The author is Marietta Holley, and she sounds like a fascinating woman: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marietta_Holley
Once a country is habituated to liars, it takes generations to bring the truth back.
~ Gore Vidal ~

timferreira
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Post by timferreira » August 22nd, 2010, 4:47 am

How about a dramatic production of "Candide"? (To add to the two versions of it already in the catalog...) Or a dramatic reading of "Piers Plowman" (by Langland) which isn't in the catalog at all yet (although it certainly should be).

I'd offer to BC them myself, but I'm up to my neck in projects at the moment. :)
Tim

[color=red]Readers wanted for [url=http://librivox.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=26922]Exemplary Novels[/url] & [url=http://librivox.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=27053]Studies in the Psychology of Sex[/url].[/color]

LindaHogan
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Post by LindaHogan » November 12th, 2010, 9:20 pm

I've posted a suggestion for a Dramatic Work in the "Book Suggestions" thread, Caesar and Cleopatra by Bernard Shaw ~ I don't know if I was supposed to post it here instead ?? Here is a link to the post just incase: http://forum.librivox.org/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=29502


In Progress - viewtopic.php?f=28&t=45096
Linda H.

gloriana
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Post by gloriana » November 22nd, 2010, 9:46 am

Ben Jonson would be a great addition to the catalog. Here are some on PG:

The Alchemist - Done
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/4081

Epicoene
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/4011

Every Man in his Humor
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/5333

Every Man out of his Humor
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/3695

Poetaster
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/5166

Sejanus
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/5232

Volpone
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/4039


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Post by Welsh Librarian » December 7th, 2010, 4:56 pm

May I be so bold as to nominate a dramatic work version of "Around the World in Eighty Days" by Jules Verne with a different person reading each character's part (for instance someone with a Central London English accent reading Phileas Fogg, someone with a South of England English accent reads Inspector Fix, someone with a Parisian French accent reads Passepartout and so on)?
[b]Good evening, gentlemen[/b]

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