New Words Learned from Librivox

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ColleenMc
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Post by ColleenMc » October 17th, 2020, 1:44 pm

In both recording and prooflistening, I've been so intrigued by the number of words that are completely new to me. Old-time writers seem to have so much richer vocabularies! I'm a pretty voracious reader, and I was a spelling bee competitor in grade school, so I have a pretty good grasp of word roots, suffixes, and prefixes, and the ability to figure out words from context -- so I rarely have to consult a dictionary to figure out a word's meaning.

I've noticed with Librivox reading, I've found myself turning to my dictionary far more than I ever have the past. So I thought I'd start a thread for recording the discovery of words, in one's native language, that are so completely new to you that you had to look them up and find out their definition. Share the word and a brief definition, okay?

Here's my first contribution, and the one that inspired this thread:

lixiviated - archaic chemistry term for the separation of a substance into soluble and insoluble components by percolation of liquid.

Context in the piece I was reading: "...only in the higher regions with greater falls of moisture, and by the banks of rivers, is the soil sufficiently lixiviated to be fit for cultivation."

Your turn!

Colleen

mightyfelix
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Post by mightyfelix » October 17th, 2020, 4:46 pm

Ooh, what a good thread topic! I know I've come across several, but I can't think of any right now. I'll definitely post the next one I see, though! :D

ColleenMc
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Post by ColleenMc » October 18th, 2020, 6:54 pm

Two more -- from the same section as my first entry here!

dolichocephalic - having a longer than average skull

mesocephalic - having a medium sized skull

Colleen

realisticspeakers
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Post by realisticspeakers » October 19th, 2020, 5:09 am

...it is to have the right, tinder the new plan, of appealing to the Interstate Commerce Commission.

In the State Of The Union Addresses By United States Presidents series, it seems to be used as a preposition.

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/tinder

It almost kinda makes sense as a verb, but in every dictionary online I've looked at, and I've looked at a few, there is no entry as a verb.
Even the etymology does not reveal it as a verb:
tinder (n.)
"dry, inflammable substance," Old English tynder, from or related to tendan "to kindle," from Proto-Germanic *tund- "ignite, kindle" ...


It is close to tender, but in these contexts it only barely makes sense as an intransitive verb.

Tinder a definitive source, it is a mystery.
Truth exists for the wise, Beauty for a feeling heart: They belong to each other. - Beethoven
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"Kind reader, if this our performance doth in aught fall short of promise, blame not our good intent, but our unperfect wit."

mightyfelix
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Post by mightyfelix » October 19th, 2020, 5:41 am

In the quote above, it kind of seems like a printer's error. Under, rather than tinder, would make sense. And it's not hard to see how the one could be mistaken for the other, especially from a handwritten manuscript.

realisticspeakers
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Post by realisticspeakers » October 19th, 2020, 11:59 am

mightyfelix wrote:
October 19th, 2020, 5:41 am
In the quote above, it kind of seems like a printer's error. Under, rather than tinder, would make sense. And it's not hard to see how the one could be mistaken for the other, especially from a handwritten manuscript.
ooh, yeah! Now I'm going to have to search all of the previous hundred or so years to see if it works with all the occurrences....probably want to re record them all too "eek:emoji"
Truth exists for the wise, Beauty for a feeling heart: They belong to each other. - Beethoven
Disclaimer:
"Kind reader, if this our performance doth in aught fall short of promise, blame not our good intent, but our unperfect wit."

mightyfelix
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Post by mightyfelix » October 19th, 2020, 1:26 pm

:lol: Well, even if my guess is right, I wouldn't worry about rerecording them. It's not our job to fix printer's errors, frankly. And I may be way off anyway.

realisticspeakers
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Post by realisticspeakers » October 19th, 2020, 2:01 pm

mightyfelix wrote:
October 19th, 2020, 1:26 pm
:lol: Well, even if my guess is right, I wouldn't worry about rerecording them. It's not our job to fix printer's errors, frankly. And I may be way off anyway.
You are quite correct. Every occurrence of "tinder" in the SOTUs works for "under".
I may lose sleep.
Truth exists for the wise, Beauty for a feeling heart: They belong to each other. - Beethoven
Disclaimer:
"Kind reader, if this our performance doth in aught fall short of promise, blame not our good intent, but our unperfect wit."

annise
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Post by annise » October 19th, 2020, 3:14 pm

unless you are reading from a scan it is more likely to be an OCR error not picked up by those preparing OCRs for "publishing" . It is more difficult to pick up errors that make real words - the ones I've done I have started by doing a spell check which flags many OCR mistakes but I've not done it "professionally", there may be better ways. If it is a PG text, they like being told - there is a procedure for reporting errors.
Anne

SonOfTheExiles
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Post by SonOfTheExiles » October 19th, 2020, 3:50 pm

Sonia certainly learnt some new words, not to mention a new orthography, not so long ago when she PLed my Australian novel-in-verse project by C. J. Dennis.

And she thought she knew “Romeo and Juliet”. :lol:

https://www.poetrylibrary.edu.au/poets/dennis-c-j-clarence-james/poems/the-play-0098005

Cheers,
Chris
"Sorry, my tongue got in the way of my eye-tooth, and I couldn't see what I was saying..."
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