Authors Then & Now

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lymiewithpurpose
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Post by lymiewithpurpose » May 7th, 2019, 7:07 am

mightyfelix wrote:
May 6th, 2019, 10:17 pm
Campbell, you and I are different in how we read, then, I think. If I find a lot of misspellings and incorrect grammar in a book or article, I really struggle with it! For one thing, I find it hard to take the author seriously, even when their arguments show that they know what they're talking about. Some kind of bias there, I guess. But also, it's just really hard for me to follow when there are lots of errors like that. I keep having to reread and ask myself what it means.
Aah, see my problem is that I am absolutely horrific at grammar and spelling. I thoroughly depend on my computer's grammar/spell check to catch my errors. So, half the time, I can't tell that there's a problem with it :shock:. The other half of the time I can forgive it because I know that it's still better than what I could do :oops:. But we're all different!
Twocky61 wrote:
May 7th, 2019, 12:32 am
Which do you prefer?
I'm going full out e books here, I struggle immensely reading from a paper. I can only really understand when reading from a screen :hmm:
Campbell
Constructive criticism always welcome

Readers wanted: The Cliff-Dwellers

Twocky61
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Post by Twocky61 » May 7th, 2019, 7:13 am

lol
Read a book; throw out your Kindle. Power cut? How are you going to use your Kindle with no power? Light a candle & read a book

ej400
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Post by ej400 » May 20th, 2019, 2:04 pm

I think that there are more writers nowadays, and that there are more books being published now, but I think it's only because the human population has gone up. I also believe there are more people in the world who would write, if they had the motivation or tried to find time in order to do it. Some people find books to be less important than others think, or maybe someone just doesn't like reading. We now have evolved, and movies and TV has dramatically changed the story time aspect, so that can also play a part into reading VS watching. Reading, we picture and create our own world from what the author tells us, where in the movie, it shows us exactly what everything should look like. That could also be a reason why spelling has become a small problem, because kids can just watch, rather than read. It takes longer to read a description of something, then seeing the picture of it. So maybe electronics play a part in it

cowguy02
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Post by cowguy02 » May 30th, 2019, 9:50 pm

The real question is are there as many good authors today as a hundred years ago. And I would say that in general the quality of Literature back then was far superior to now.
~Luke Castle
Due to school I am much busier then in the summer. Please bear with me as I work through my PL backlog.

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lymiewithpurpose
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Post by lymiewithpurpose » May 31st, 2019, 6:33 am

cowguy02 wrote:
May 30th, 2019, 9:50 pm
The real question is are there as many good authors today as a hundred years ago. And I would say that in general the quality of Literature back then was far superior to now.
I am actually going to disagree here. I feel like modern day authors are more creative. With all the different mediums out there to work with and all the different writing styles/types etc., I think that they have done an incredible job molding their works to fit the time period. It is especially hard now to keep readers interested and reading the book with all the technology options out there, so I think it takes more work to make things interesting. But older writers are great too.
Campbell
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cowguy02
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Post by cowguy02 » May 31st, 2019, 6:41 am

lymiewithpurpose wrote:
May 31st, 2019, 6:33 am
cowguy02 wrote:
May 30th, 2019, 9:50 pm
The real question is are there as many good authors today as a hundred years ago. And I would say that in general the quality of Literature back then was far superior to now.
I am actually going to disagree here. I feel like modern day authors are more creative. With all the different mediums out there to work with and all the different writing styles/types etc., I think that they have done an incredible job molding their works to fit the time period. It is especially hard now to keep readers interested and reading the book with all the technology options out there, so I think it takes more work to make things interesting. But older writers are great too.
But does creativity always mean a better book? I am of the opinion that the smaller vocabulary and the recycling of story lines generally make this literature of a lower quality. However I will agree with you that there are some great pieces out there. I was really talking like a overall.
~Luke Castle
Due to school I am much busier then in the summer. Please bear with me as I work through my PL backlog.

Projects that need readers
Bealby
Freckles The life of Harriot Stuart The House By The Churchyard

Dramatic Read!The Blind Brother

lymiewithpurpose
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Post by lymiewithpurpose » May 31st, 2019, 6:50 am

cowguy02 wrote:
May 31st, 2019, 6:41 am
lymiewithpurpose wrote:
May 31st, 2019, 6:33 am
cowguy02 wrote:
May 30th, 2019, 9:50 pm
The real question is are there as many good authors today as a hundred years ago. And I would say that in general the quality of Literature back then was far superior to now.
I am actually going to disagree here. I feel like modern day authors are more creative. With all the different mediums out there to work with and all the different writing styles/types etc., I think that they have done an incredible job molding their works to fit the time period. It is especially hard now to keep readers interested and reading the book with all the technology options out there, so I think it takes more work to make things interesting. But older writers are great too.
But does creativity always mean a better book? I am of the opinion that the smaller vocabulary and the recycling of story lines generally make this literature of a lower quality. However I will agree with you that there are some great pieces out there. I was really talking like a overall.
I personally don't think that vocabulary makes the book. I mean it does, but not in the sense of how many words are included. I think what is more important is how you use your words, no matter how large or small your vocabulary is, to achieve your purpose. Sometimes (not all the times) it can be more impressive to achieve the same purpose with a smaller set of words. I think there's a lot of factors out there and it's hard to judge.
Campbell
Constructive criticism always welcome

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mightyfelix
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Post by mightyfelix » May 31st, 2019, 7:00 am

cowguy02 wrote:
May 30th, 2019, 9:50 pm
The real question is are there as many good authors today as a hundred years ago. And I would say that in general the quality of Literature back then was far superior to now.
I'm not sure I agree with you either. Not because I think today's writers are better or more talented or more creative. But just because I think we're not in a good position to judge. We don't truly have a representative sample of older literature readily available. The mediocre and just plain bad writers of a century or two ago have largely been forgotten. Some of their books are still floating around, sure, but they aren't being reprinted. They aren't being talked about. We've probably never heard of many of them. So when we talk about writers from a century ago, we're taking about the cream of the crop. The dross, if you will, has burned off, and we're left with the gold. Today, however, there's plenty of dross still being printed. It hasn't had time to be winnowed out (if you'll pardon my mixed metaphors).
Devorah Allen

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lurcherlover
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Post by lurcherlover » May 31st, 2019, 7:10 am

It's a difficult one to argue either way, but I would edge towards thinking that books before say 1950 are perhaps better. And I think there is still plenty of dross around from pre medieval times to the early 20C. It's just that writers such as Shakespeare have added so much genius that it is hard for a modern writer to meet the challenge. Also, if you look at the really terrible modern writers, I can only say that they are REALLY terrible!

ej400
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Post by ej400 » May 31st, 2019, 10:36 am

I do think vocabulary plays a part in making a better book though, and I think back then they did a bit of a better job in doing so. If you have a book averaging three to four letters per word, then I think the quality. Example: "they ran down to the lake, and they looked at the cool views that were there". You can turn this sentence into something much better, "Campbell, Devorah and Luke ran down to the lake, it's waters glistening quite brightly. There were breathtaking views surrounding them." When the average letters in each word goes down, it means the author is probably doing a worse job of description, and in order to have a good book, you must constantly come up with good descriptions.

KevinS
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Post by KevinS » May 31st, 2019, 11:21 am

Speling is importent two.
E agora, José?

mightyfelix
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Post by mightyfelix » May 31st, 2019, 11:51 am

KevinS wrote:
May 31st, 2019, 11:21 am
Speling is importent two.
:lol: That's what editors are for!
Devorah Allen

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DACSoft
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Post by DACSoft » May 31st, 2019, 12:03 pm

cowguy02 wrote:
May 30th, 2019, 9:50 pm
The real question is are there as many good authors today as a hundred years ago. And I would say that in general the quality of Literature back then was far superior to now.
I tend to agree with you. With all the self-publishing going on these days, wannabee "authors," who think they are the next Hemingway, Steinbeck, name your favorite, can easily publish their work, no matter whether it is worth the paper (or electrons) on which it is presented, or not.

Back in the day, authors needed editors, publishers, and the like to get their works published and distributed. There had to be, at least, that first level of interest as authors shopped around their work. Now authors can create their own websites and publish their works. This is not to say that there aren't some truly exceptional works being created today that will become classics. But it's a lot easier to create and publish cr*p as well (which of course, is in the eye of the beholder). :)

Not only can there be bad content or character development or story development, but also bad grammar, bad spelling, my own pet peeve about the lack or misuse of capitalization and punctuation. However, I believe there still is that core of new authors who produce great work ... but I think it's harder to find through the weeds now, than in the past.

Don

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Post by lurcherlover » May 31st, 2019, 1:37 pm

As far as scripts go for films and particularly TV, I've found that in the last ten or twenty years that the standards are appallingly low. Writers who have no idea about plot structure, how to characterise, or how to just write in good English. (Foreign languages I can't comment on, but I bet that French and Italian scripts just to name two, are a lot better). I often wonder what planet some of these English scriptwriters come from!

lymiewithpurpose
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Post by lymiewithpurpose » May 31st, 2019, 1:48 pm

lurcherlover wrote:
May 31st, 2019, 1:37 pm
As far as scripts go for films and particularly TV, I've found that in the last ten or twenty years that the standards are appallingly low. Writers who have no idea about plot structure, how to characterise, or how to just write in good English. (Foreign languages I can't comment on, but I bet that French and Italian scripts just to name two, are a lot better). I often wonder what planet some of these English scriptwriters come from!
Interesting that you discuss plot structure. I am going to take the opposing side and say that I much prefer the plots of modern day novels. They may not have all the components or in perfect order, but they keep me engaged. 99% of older books bore me to death, so I choose what I read carefully. I know when I am assigned a book in school I look at the publication date, if I see it's decently old I automatically have a prejudice against it. And oftentimes I feel like poor English is intentional. The vast majority of people in the real world do not speak in formal and proper language all the time, and this accurately represents our current setting. Again, this is a youngster's opinion though.
Campbell
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Readers wanted: The Cliff-Dwellers

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