How Should I Stop/Decrease Stuttering?

Everything except LibriVox (yes, this is where knitting gets discussed. Now includes non-LV Volunteers Wanted projects)
mightyfelix
Posts: 3072
Joined: August 7th, 2016, 6:39 pm

Post by mightyfelix » January 25th, 2019, 7:00 pm

tovarisch wrote:
January 25th, 2019, 3:25 pm
You are obviously better than I at "monitoring" yourself. I *know* that even though I think about those things and listen to the surroundings (and pause when a truck rolls by or the neighbour's dog barks), I *shall* miss words or in the excitement substitute one for another. I am not a native English speaker, those things are "natural" to me, you know. :wink:
I am a native English speaker and still do this occasionally. I think the best one was when the text said something about a "chocolate colored Pomeranian." I said "chocolate covered Pomeranian" and just kept on rolling! Thank goodness I listened to that part afterwards!

annise
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 30403
Joined: April 3rd, 2008, 3:55 am
Location: Melbourne,Australia

Post by annise » January 25th, 2019, 11:12 pm

Sounds delicious :D

Cori
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 12080
Joined: November 22nd, 2005, 10:22 am
Location: Great Britain
Contact:

Post by Cori » January 26th, 2019, 7:23 am

Possible useful comment: Jay, had you experimented with players that can speed up the recording? You could listen through more quickly that way, though it might be more bother than it's worth going between the player and Audacity for editing.

Fairly unhelpful comment:
mightyfelix wrote:
January 25th, 2019, 7:00 pm
I think the best one was when the text said something about a "chocolate colored Pomeranian." I said "chocolate covered Pomeranian" and just kept on rolling!
That is hilarious! I've done the same thing repeatedly with books that mention the Royal Navy, where there turn out to be a lot of 'Rear Admirables' (which they might well have been, but should be 'Admiral').

More seriously, though, the majority of what my lovely, patient PLs catch are misreads along those lines. If I didn't listen to everything as I edit, they'd have to do far more work -- but my goal is to get PL-OK first time, every time, out of respect for their time. :9:
There's honestly no such thing as a stupid question -- but I'm afraid I can't rule out giving a stupid answer : : To Posterity and Beyond!

DACSoft
Posts: 1008
Joined: August 17th, 2013, 8:51 am
Location: Connecticut, US

Post by DACSoft » January 26th, 2019, 7:54 am

Cori wrote:
January 26th, 2019, 7:23 am
More seriously, though, the majority of what my lovely, patient PLs catch are misreads along those lines. If I didn't listen to everything as I edit, they'd have to do far more work -- but my goal is to get PL-OK first time, every time, out of respect for their time.
Hear! Hear! :clap:

That's also my goal for the projects I read, although I don't always achieve it. :oops:

Don
Don (DACSoft)
Bringing the Baseball Joe series to audio!

In Progress:
Left to Themselves; Baseball Joe in the Central League
Next up:
Baseball Joe in the Big League; Whispering Tongues; Baseball Joe on the Giants

JayKitty76
Posts: 832
Joined: August 3rd, 2018, 3:16 pm
Location: In a galaxy far, far away...
Contact:

Post by JayKitty76 » January 26th, 2019, 12:39 pm

Thanks, everybody!
Cori,
I've tried the speed-up player in Audacity, but it makes the black line ZOOM through the sound waves- making me dizzy :lol:
I'll check out other app ones, though :thumbs:

JayKitty76
Posts: 832
Joined: August 3rd, 2018, 3:16 pm
Location: In a galaxy far, far away...
Contact:

Post by JayKitty76 » January 26th, 2019, 1:22 pm

Foon wrote:
January 25th, 2019, 3:16 pm
I never go back and listen to the full recording. In my solos I've been doing a lot of very long recordings (over 1 hour) and I simply don't have that time to spend. Instead, I've gotten very used to actively monitoring myself while recording. Slight stumble? Mispronunciation? Slurred speech? I immediately stop, snap my fingers (giving a clear big short spike in the recording), and repeat the phrase from the start, or from a recent comma where there was a breathing space, i.e. so that the point where I need to edit it is during silence. I don't think about it long, just if there is a doubt of it needing to be better, I just redo it.
Next to that, I always have my recording open on my screen, so I can monitor what is happening there too. Getting a bit too excited and speaking too loudly? Snap fingers, redo. See a weird spike appearing from some kind of internal click in my laptop? Snap, redo. Etc.

Then after, I scroll through my recording from the start, and look for the spikes of my finger snaps. I also always have "mark clipping" or whatever it's called turned on, so there's a bright red line on my snaps. Then all I need to do is find the point before the line from where I restarted, and delete from there up to the start of my speech after the snap. Easy peasy.
The added benefit of the snaps + red lines is that when I zoom out, the red lines remain very visible. So after I'm done, I can at a glance see if I missed any editing spots.
Thanks, Foon. I will try marking my mistakes. I never thought to have the recording open from the start, just sized down so I can still read from the text. I'll try that- it's also a way of ensuring I actually record what I'm saying :lol: (Once I accidentally muted the recording halfway through...but if I'm monitoring it constantly I can stop it early on. That time I 'finished' reading the section, only to find I had about 8 minutes of flatlining...)

JayKitty76
Posts: 832
Joined: August 3rd, 2018, 3:16 pm
Location: In a galaxy far, far away...
Contact:

Post by JayKitty76 » January 26th, 2019, 1:26 pm

mightyfelix wrote:
January 25th, 2019, 7:00 pm
tovarisch wrote:
January 25th, 2019, 3:25 pm
You are obviously better than I at "monitoring" yourself. I *know* that even though I think about those things and listen to the surroundings (and pause when a truck rolls by or the neighbour's dog barks), I *shall* miss words or in the excitement substitute one for another. I am not a native English speaker, those things are "natural" to me, you know. :wink:
I am a native English speaker and still do this occasionally. I think the best one was when the text said something about a "chocolate colored Pomeranian." I said "chocolate covered Pomeranian" and just kept on rolling! Thank goodness I listened to that part afterwards!
It does sound delicious! At least, the chocolate... I'm not sure how chocolate would taste on a Pomeranian... :lol:

It is better if you listen to the whole recording, in order to catch mistakes that might otherwise be caught by a PLer. Listening beforehand saves you a slight amount of embarrassment, too, since the PL notes are generally posted on a public forum :wink:

I'm trying to get everything PL OK the first time...I still get lots of PL notes, but that's ok- I'm still learning and I'm developing in the quality of my recordings, soon enough I'll be getting better and better :D

Foon
Posts: 2105
Joined: May 10th, 2018, 2:33 pm

Post by Foon » January 27th, 2019, 7:48 am

JayKitty76 wrote:
January 26th, 2019, 1:22 pm

Thanks, Foon. I will try marking my mistakes. I never thought to have the recording open from the start, just sized down so I can still read from the text. I'll try that- it's also a way of ensuring I actually record what I'm saying :lol: (Once I accidentally muted the recording halfway through...but if I'm monitoring it constantly I can stop it early on. That time I 'finished' reading the section, only to find I had about 8 minutes of flatlining...)
That is EXACTLY why I made it a point always to have my recording visible! :lol: I've had it randomly stop on me before, and after reading a full section, I found that I had about 30 seconds of recorded audio... :roll: So I never record without being able to see it anymore.

I get that my method doesn't work for everyone; I'm reasonably good at reading word-perfect, so I don't need to worry about it that much (although mistakes still happen, of course). And I've gotten so used to monitoring what I say, which makes my system work well for me--I hardly ever get PL notes. But my main take away message was that it can be useful to get used to fixing mistakes right away (and clearly marking them), rather than going back in and redoing a line after you've already finished recording (after all, trying to match inflection/reading speed/whatever else can take quite some time and effort). But to each their own, of course! :)
Foon - Please correct my pronunciation!

Readers needed:
Arabian Nights (Vol. 10)

JayKitty76
Posts: 832
Joined: August 3rd, 2018, 3:16 pm
Location: In a galaxy far, far away...
Contact:

Post by JayKitty76 » January 28th, 2019, 2:33 pm

Foon wrote:
January 27th, 2019, 7:48 am
JayKitty76 wrote:
January 26th, 2019, 1:22 pm

Thanks, Foon. I will try marking my mistakes. I never thought to have the recording open from the start, just sized down so I can still read from the text. I'll try that- it's also a way of ensuring I actually record what I'm saying :lol: (Once I accidentally muted the recording halfway through...but if I'm monitoring it constantly I can stop it early on. That time I 'finished' reading the section, only to find I had about 8 minutes of flatlining...)
That is EXACTLY why I made it a point always to have my recording visible! :lol: I've had it randomly stop on me before, and after reading a full section, I found that I had about 30 seconds of recorded audio... :roll: So I never record without being able to see it anymore.

I get that my method doesn't work for everyone; I'm reasonably good at reading word-perfect, so I don't need to worry about it that much (although mistakes still happen, of course). And I've gotten so used to monitoring what I say, which makes my system work well for me--I hardly ever get PL notes. But my main take away message was that it can be useful to get used to fixing mistakes right away (and clearly marking them), rather than going back in and redoing a line after you've already finished recording (after all, trying to match inflection/reading speed/whatever else can take quite some time and effort). But to each their own, of course! :)
You are much more experienced at reading for LV than I am-- I still get PL notes a lot and I've only had 1 word perfect submission so far. *shrug* But that's OK, as I said before I'm still learning :)
Thank you for the helpful tips, you introduced a new concept to me that I never even thought of 8-)

ej400
Posts: 1146
Joined: September 24th, 2014, 10:26 am
Location: Minnesuper snowta right now

Post by ej400 » January 29th, 2019, 11:30 am

I have the problem quite often, I just randomly say the wrong words at the wrong times, (and sometimes don't even notice it :shock: ). As for stuttering though, I usually stutter only once or twice in my recordings, but I've found that the more you get used to the book or the wording of the book your reading, the less you'll stutter. I was having problems in my solos with stuttering at one point, but then I got used to the books more, and things got better. Maybe before recording, try to familiarize yourself with the text. It will certainly help cut down some stutters.
I am in need of a DPL for my solo of the 1st volume of 12, of the works of Edmund Burke: viewtopic.php?f=28&t=73740

JayKitty76
Posts: 832
Joined: August 3rd, 2018, 3:16 pm
Location: In a galaxy far, far away...
Contact:

Post by JayKitty76 » January 29th, 2019, 2:54 pm

Thank you, ej400. I think that has worked for me in the past, but for some reason, I forgot that that had worked. Thanks for the tip. As Anne said earlier, the text is fairly difficult and (as with all PD texts) was written a while ago, so it is unusually hard to read. I'll try that the next time I go to record it, though- whether that be today, or tomorrow, or whenever :thumbs:

Post Reply