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VfkaBT
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Post by VfkaBT » January 16th, 2017, 10:15 am

https://archive.org/details/FrugalVegetarianCookingMPCC
Took me a year to write this recipe book, aimed at people on tight budgets. 43 recipes all told. ;)
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chocoholic
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Post by chocoholic » January 16th, 2017, 6:21 pm

Looks great! Your soups look delicious!
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annise
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Post by annise » January 16th, 2017, 7:03 pm

A question from a non american - what exactly is canned tomato sauce ? I aways have to make something up when I come accross it in recipes

Anne

VfkaBT
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Post by VfkaBT » January 16th, 2017, 7:11 pm

annise wrote:A question from a non american - what exactly is canned tomato sauce ? I aways have to make something up when I come accross it in recipes

Anne
It's usually a liquid distillation of tomatoes, probably a combo of water and tomato paste with a little salt and preservative. Hunts is a popular brand here.

And thanks, Laurie Anne. ;)
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chocoholic
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Post by chocoholic » January 16th, 2017, 7:24 pm

You're welcome!

Tomato sauce is thicker than tomato juice. You would make a homemade version by pureeing cooked tomatoes (no skin or seeds). Most canned tomato sauce is seasoned with salt and maybe a bit of basil or other herbs; some varieties have more added seasoning than others. After doing an Internet search for "Australia canned tomato sauce" (because I had no idea everybody didn't call it tomato sauce), I feel it necessary to say it is NOT ketchup. Not not not. It is not the sweet vinegary tomato-based condiment that you squirt onto a hot dog or dip your French fries in. It is the stuff you pour into a pot, add garlic/basil/oregano/onion/etc, cook for a while, and then use as pasta sauce.
Laurie Anne

tovarisch
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Post by tovarisch » January 16th, 2017, 7:31 pm

chocoholic wrote:...It is not the sweet vinegary tomato-based condiment that you squirt onto a hot dog or dip your French fries in...
Are you sure they are known in Australia as "French fries"? :wink: Just checking... :lol:
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annise
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Post by annise » January 16th, 2017, 7:33 pm

sounds like what we call tomato paste then - usually just concentrated tomato puree but sometimes with herbs etc added .
I usually start off believing that's what it is but chicken out and add dashes of any other tomato things I have just in case :D

Thank you.

Anne
And yes , the thin ones are french fries nowadays but the fat ones are chips. And dipping either in tomato whatever is almost a sin. Eaten out of a newspaper wrapping was the ultimate way , just sprinkled in salt .

tovarisch
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Post by tovarisch » January 16th, 2017, 7:38 pm

annise wrote:sounds like what we call tomato paste then - usually just concentrated tomato puree but sometimes with herbs etc added .
Just to bring to your attention: paste is much thicker than sauce which is thicker than juice. Paste will stay in the tin when you flip it upside down after opening, the sauce will flow. The sauce in the States is the consistency of motor oil, whereas paste is the consistency of grease.
tovarisch
  • reality prompts me to scale down my reading, sorry to say
    to PLers: do correct my pronunciation please

chocoholic
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Post by chocoholic » January 16th, 2017, 7:43 pm

Haha, I almost called them just "fries" but thought there was a chance it could mean sausages or something over there. :D

I ran across this while I was looking. Interesting -- I didn't know tomato products were called so many different things in different countries. Writing cookbooks for international audiences must be awful (if anybody even attempts it).
http://www.discusscooking.com/forums/f17/tomato-sauce-australian-vs-american-44561.html
Laurie Anne

SonOfTheExiles
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Post by SonOfTheExiles » January 16th, 2017, 8:56 pm

Wait till the folks outside Australia find out we put the Rosella on our pies and sausage rolls, Anne.

SOTE

PS I can hear them googling it now. And going "Eeewww!". Then "Oh..."
"Sorry, my tongue got in the way of my eye-tooth, and I couldn't see what I was saying..."
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annise
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Post by annise » January 16th, 2017, 9:14 pm

tovarisch wrote:
annise wrote:sounds like what we call tomato paste then - usually just concentrated tomato puree but sometimes with herbs etc added .
Just to bring to your attention: paste is much thicker than sauce which is thicker than juice. Paste will stay in the tin when you flip it upside down after opening, the sauce will flow. The sauce in the States is the consistency of motor oil, whereas paste is the consistency of grease.
So it's sort of like mixing tomato juice and tomato paste then , so I haven't been too far out , I've never used as much tomato paste as the recipe said "sauce" , it just didn't seem right

Anne

knotyouraveragejo
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Post by knotyouraveragejo » January 16th, 2017, 10:09 pm

More like adding water to unseasoned tomato paste - I use about 2 parts water to 1 part paste to give the approximate consistency of tomato sauce and then add seasonings as desired. Use it without seasoning if the recipe just calls for tomato sauce.
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annise
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Post by annise » January 16th, 2017, 11:06 pm

more like sugo - or is that not available in the USA ?

RuthieG
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Post by RuthieG » January 17th, 2017, 2:14 am

In the UK we call tomato paste "tomato purée" and the thinner one that pours "tomato passata". As far as I know, both are just pulped tomatoes, presumably sieved to remove skin and seeds, with varying quantities of liquid.

Ruth
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SonOfTheExiles
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Post by SonOfTheExiles » January 17th, 2017, 2:39 am

A German cookery student I knew about thirty years ago told me that one should not pause too long between the first and second syllable of "purée".

Deer oh deery me,
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