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Post Posted:: July 4th, 2017, 5:26 pm 
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Joined: May 14th, 2012, 5:09 am
Posts: 6972
Location: in the sun
My June books :)

Chinua Achebe: Things Fall Apart (1959). I realize this is an iconic book by Achebe, a giant among African writers. I appreciate its impact and importance, but it didn't grab me.
David Howarth: Ni Liv (1955). A read-aloud with my 10yo. A biography of a Norwegian saboteur during WW2. Incredible story of survival.
Karl Ove Knausgård: My Struggle, book 1 (2009/2012). I know I'm late to the party here! This autobiographical writing is strangely compelling, almost addictive. His ability to describe, capture in words, and the tone of the more essay-like parts of the volume makes me want to read book 2 as well!
Jack London: Call of the Wild. Family read-aloud. I loved London as a pre-teen, I still find his writing and wilderness descriptions really compelling.
Stephen King: Bag of Bones (1998). This is the first King-book I've ever read. Frankly, I'm not eager to read more.
Nina LaCour: We are Okay (2017). YA fiction about first year of college, friendship, love, death, human connection. I liked it.
Graeme Simsion: The Rosie Project (2013). Quirkily funny about Don, who is somewhere on the autism spectrum, and his budding relationship with Rosie, who is messy and irrational. Made me laugh, and think :)
Piper Kerman: Orange is the New Black (2010). Autobiography about a well-educated, white, middle-class woman who spends a year in prison for a 10 year old drug offense. I was a bit disappointed about the prose, but found it interesting enough. She talks about "prison Zen," which I liked!

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Kathrine

~~ Thanks for your patience! Please feel free to send me a PM if you feel that I'm neglecting you ~~

Fairytales in Danish, Swedish, or Norwegian
Lots of short stories and myths that deal with nature from all over the world


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Post Posted:: July 4th, 2017, 6:39 pm 

Joined: April 6th, 2017, 11:37 am
Posts: 401
Location: USA
I read several books last month.
Treasure Island by Robert Lewis Stevenson
The Story of Robin Hood by Bertha E Bush
Peter Pan by J. M. Barrie (One of my favorites)
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain
Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
The Fairy Changeling by Dora Sigerson Shorter
Lord of the Flies by William Golding
Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck
The Adventures of Robin Hood by Howard Pyle
The Story of Napoleon by H. E. Marshall
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum

Some I listened through Librivox and other audiobooks, but about half I read.

I've got quite a list for next month. I'm half way through Little Women and Huckleberry Finn. I want to read Little Men, the Blue Fairy Book, Le Mort d'Arthur and books I want to read to my daughter: A Little Princess, The Secret Garden, and some of the Narnia books.


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Post Posted:: July 15th, 2017, 3:30 pm 

Joined: October 4th, 2008, 8:06 pm
Posts: 670
Location: Arkansas
Here is my list of books for June:

"The Player’s Boy" by Bryher (pen name of Annie Winifred Ellerman) Good, unusual novel set in England in the era of James I.

"Persuasion" by Jane Austin. LibriVox download beautifully read by Elizabeth Klett. I’m not a special fan of Miss Austen's books – maybe I’m too old. I can’t get into her 18th century attitude of romance. This book was entertaining, especially as it was so wonderfully read by Ms. Klett.

"Lost City of the Monkey God" by Douglas Preston Kindle download. Very good book. I first heard about it on a CBS Sunday news program. The book sounded intriguing, and it was. It was quite an adventure story. This link to the segment of the CBS program tells a lot about the book. http://www.cbsnews.com/news/curse-of-the-lost-city-of-the-monkey-god/

"The Bone Garden" by Tess Gerritson. Downloaded audio book from library. Nice, entertaining book. Lots going on. Good summertime entertainment.

"Ice in June, A Playwright’s Story" by Fred M. White. Gutenberg download from “Golden Stories: A Selection of the Best Fiction by the Foremost Writers" My short story for June. OK story, but nothing special about it. He also wrote sci-fi. Perhaps his science fiction stories were better than this one.

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“The only important thing in a book is the meaning that it has for you.”
― W. Somerset Maugham

Marsupial's Books


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Post Posted:: August 4th, 2017, 12:12 pm 
LibriVox Admin Team

Joined: May 14th, 2012, 5:09 am
Posts: 6972
Location: in the sun
My July books:
All the light we cannot see (2014) by Anthony Doerr. Emotionally satisfying, well written about children and teens in WW2 (though not--necessarily--for young readers). I thought it was about 100 pages too long, though.
Never let me go (2005) by Kazuo Ishiguro. About clones, donors, careers. I read it with severe back pain, but found it a genuinely annoying book.
The Snowman (2010/2012) by Jo Nesbø. Very readerfriendly, good entertainment.
Hatchet (1987) by Gary Paulsen. Family read-aloud. Instructive self-talk!
One plus one (2014) by Jojo Moyes. Readerfriendly, tearjerker, forgettable.
The end of the beginning (2004) by Avi. Sweet.
A beginning, a muddle, and an end (2008) by Avi. Annoying! Maybe my patience was just over, but I felt this one was too clever by half.
Sense and sensibility by Jane Austen. With a brother like Mr. Dashwood, who needs enemies!
My struggle, book 2 by Karl Ove Knausgard. Family, kids, love and frustration.
The Astonishing Life of Octavian Nothing vol. 1: The Pox Party (2006) by M.T. Anderson. I've been reading this in parallel with Johnny Tremain, both about the same time, place and (partly)the same people. This is a reimagination. It is well written and clever, but for me it had lots of resistance.
Obernewtyn (1987) by Isobelle Carmody. YA sci-fi/fantasy, postapocalyptic about people with powers of reaching into the minds of others and powerstruggles. Meh.
The Reluctant Fundamentalist (2007) by Mohsin Hamid. Drawing-me-in 1st person narrative about our post-9/11 world.
Persuasion (1817) by Jane Austen. Ah, teh power of a loveletter!
South of the border, west of the sun (1998) by Haruki Murakami. Such muted, clear prose. Disappearing women, togetherness, presentness, love, solitude.

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Kathrine

~~ Thanks for your patience! Please feel free to send me a PM if you feel that I'm neglecting you ~~

Fairytales in Danish, Swedish, or Norwegian
Lots of short stories and myths that deal with nature from all over the world


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Post Posted:: August 4th, 2017, 8:18 pm 

Joined: October 4th, 2008, 8:06 pm
Posts: 670
Location: Arkansas
Only a few books read for July. One that I liked a lot was "Isaac’s Storm" by Erik Larson. Overdrive library e-book download. Excellent account of the 1900 Galveston hurricane.

"Thurber on Crime" by James Thurber. Library sale book. “Stories, articles, drawings and reflections on the evil that men and women do.” Nice little book.

"Lights and Shadows of New York Life" by James Dabney McCabe. A Gutenberg download that I started some time ago. This interesting sounding book was my pick for a book/story about the state of New York for my “50 States 50 Stories” project. The book is actually about New York City. It’s a very interesting, often fascinating description of the city’s past. Of course it was a current picture of the city at the time it was written in the 1870s. It’s a fascinating look at what the city was like during that time.

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Mary


“The only important thing in a book is the meaning that it has for you.”
― W. Somerset Maugham

Marsupial's Books


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Post Posted:: September 6th, 2017, 4:30 pm 

Joined: October 4th, 2008, 8:06 pm
Posts: 670
Location: Arkansas
My books read for August. I've started some others, but don't count them until completed:

"The Octopus" by Frank Norris, LibriVox download. A very good book. At times a little long and preachy, but beautifully read (performed) by Delmar H. Dolbier

"Water for Elephants" by Sara Gruen. Amazon e-book download. I liked this book very much. Will check out the movie some time.

"Land of the Burnt Thigh" by Edith Ammons Kohl. Gutenberg download. Excellent, true account of early 20th century settlement by two sisters (plus others) in South Dakota.

"Lake Woebegon: Summer 1956" by Garrison Keillor. Library sale book. Good, fictional memoir.

"Roman Wall" by Bryher (Annie Winifred Ellerman) Library sale book. Good, historical novel of the 3rd century Roman frontier. Well written characters.

Although not actual books, I've also been listening to stories on archive.org from the old radio series "Suspense". Nothing earth shaking so far as the plot goes, but it's fun to listen to some of the well known actors of that era - Agnes Moorehead, Roddy McDowell, Edmond O'Brien, etc. Entertaining stories.

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Mary


“The only important thing in a book is the meaning that it has for you.”
― W. Somerset Maugham

Marsupial's Books


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Post Posted:: September 10th, 2017, 2:56 am 

Joined: July 14th, 2010, 12:32 pm
Posts: 2505
Location: Austria (no kangaroos ;))
I blasted past my reading goal 3 books ago without noticing. :shock: :cry:

The Elements of Eloquence: How to Turn the Perfect English Phrase by Mark Forsyth made it over the finishing line.

Page-wise I am currently at 31,401 - far below last year where I almost hit 60,000 pages by the end of the year (~40,000 pages within the first 100 books - this was one of my goals last year which I will NEVER repeat :lol: ). At the moment I don't think I will even make it to 40,000 but there is usually a surge in the later months as I am not as much out and about when it's dark and cold outside.

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Julia - Introverts, unite! Seperately... in your own homes.

Spend your free time the way you like, not the way you think you're supposed to. ― Susan Cain

Author death +70 yrs? Legamus!


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Post Posted:: October 10th, 2017, 5:18 pm 

Joined: October 4th, 2008, 8:06 pm
Posts: 670
Location: Arkansas
Only one book for September - unusual for me. The LibriVox version of "Why Frau Frohhmann Raised Her Prices and Other Stories" by Anthony Trollope. Some pleasant stories nicely read by Nicholas Clifford, as always.

I started a couple of other books last month, but could not get into either one of them. October is showing more promise.

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Mary


“The only important thing in a book is the meaning that it has for you.”
― W. Somerset Maugham

Marsupial's Books


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