Public Domain language courses!

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tina
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Post by tina » August 21st, 2006, 1:26 pm

How cool is this

The link has been edited as site had been hacked
Welcome to fsi-language-courses.com, the home for language courses developed by the Foreign Service Institute. These courses were developed by the United States government and are in the public domain.

This site is dedicated to making these language courses freely available in an electronic format. It is an independent effort to foster the learning of worldwide languages.
[url=http://librivox.org/wiki/moin.cgi/TinaTilney/]Tina's Wiki Page[/url] | I can receive files by [url=http://www.pando.com/]pando.com[/url]

kayray
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Post by kayray » August 21st, 2006, 2:09 pm

*WOW*!!!!

Thank you Tina, what a wonderful resource!
Kara
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--------
"Mary wished to say something very sensible into her Zoom H2 Handy Recorder, but knew not how." -- Jane Austen (& Kara)

opheliad
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Post by opheliad » August 21st, 2006, 3:17 pm

That looks great, hopefully they will add Japanese to it some day - I've bookmarked the site and will keep an eye on it.

Hooray for public domain!
Wherefore, be not weary in well-doing, for ye are laying the foundation of a great work. And out of small things proceedeth that which is great.

Sandra
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Post by Sandra » August 22nd, 2006, 1:27 am

That's like being shown a buried treasure for somebody like me! Great! :D
Sandra
[color=purple]As usual, the grownup world made very little sense to me... (Manny Ellis,[i] Neighbourhood Tales[/i])[/color]

pberinstein
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Post by pberinstein » August 22nd, 2006, 1:28 pm

Oh that is way cool! I was going to ask you all which language I should study, but there's only one there that I was going to consider--Spanish. The others were Norwegian (my stepson has moved to Norway), Italian (my first love), and Arabic (so I can follow what's going on in the original).
Paula B
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Laura
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Post by Laura » August 22nd, 2006, 1:57 pm

Very cool :)

I'm learning Italian via podcast at the moment :D
*//Laura http://www.librivox.org/wiki/moin.cgi/LauraD

gypsygirl
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Post by gypsygirl » August 22nd, 2006, 4:26 pm

pberinstein wrote:Oh that is way cool! I was going to ask you all which language I should study, but there's only one there that I was going to consider--Spanish. The others were Norwegian (my stepson has moved to Norway), Italian (my first love), and Arabic (so I can follow what's going on in the original).
I'd been sort of hoping for Arabic too, but I'm also interested in Portuguese and German. :)
Karen S.

DSayers
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Post by DSayers » August 22nd, 2006, 5:33 pm

Friends: It is true that in these FSI courses we have found a huge resource for promoting foreign language skills.

It's also important to note, so that no one is surprised after investing time and energy into working with FSI materials, that they were produced during the US-USSR Cold War by the United States' State Department. Drills are multiple-choice substitution/responses derived from B.F. Skinner's behavioristic learning theory. Language dialogues, to be memorized, focus on preparing State Department officials on how to introduce US agricultural and industrial methods in underdeveloped countries.

I benefitted from exposure to these materials in an unusual context. In 1972, I enrolled in CIDOC, a Spanish language institute that used FSI books. CIDOC was founded by Ivan Illich, author of DeSchooling Society. CIDOC made productive use of revenue generated by its FSI-based language courses to provide a venue for progressive educational thinkers like Paulo Freire, author of Pedagogy of the Oppressed. That was why I was there, and I have no regrets.

My point: these are well-structured materials, and savvy language learners can benefit from them, as I did. However, do not be surprised if the dialogues you are memorizing and studying, especially at the intermediate and advanced levels, are about selling more electrical appliances to pre-industrial societies in order to establish favorable trade relations with the United States.

So keep a weather eye out, if that is not your cup of tea, and learn the language structures while avoiding outdated ideologies.

-Denny
Last edited by DSayers on August 26th, 2006, 4:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Sandra
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Post by Sandra » August 25th, 2006, 12:10 am

DSayers wrote: Language dialogues, to be memorized, focus on preparing State Department officials on how to introduce US agricultural and industrial methods in underdeveloped countries.

So keep a weather eye out, if that is not your cup of tea, and learn the language structures while avoiding outdated ideologies.
It's so true. I used a Cold-War course at school back in 1978 as an introduction to Russian. Some of the first vocabulary lessons included, as I recall, words like "absolutism", "marxism", "advance guard", and an inordinate amount of geography terms for a beginning language course.

But the good news is, no matter what sort of phrases are on offer with FSI courses, one gets a feel for the language, and an idea of what it sounds like in general. Not to mention that the prospective student could surprise native speakers with terms that a beginner would be unlikely to know. Heheheh.
Sandra
[color=purple]As usual, the grownup world made very little sense to me... (Manny Ellis,[i] Neighbourhood Tales[/i])[/color]

featherheadfop
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Post by featherheadfop » August 26th, 2006, 2:20 pm

Laura wrote:Very cool :)

I'm learning Italian via podcast at the moment :D
Me, too :D, (Or I was all year prior to going to Italy, anyway), do you use learnitalianpod.com?

Laura
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Post by Laura » August 27th, 2006, 3:42 pm

YES!!!!!

I'm not very far, and the huge amount of repition annoys me at times but its pretty good!
*//Laura http://www.librivox.org/wiki/moin.cgi/LauraD

putitinyourshoe
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Post by putitinyourshoe » August 29th, 2006, 7:07 pm

wow thanks. languages are my super fave. i kind of get a bit obsessed sometimes, but they come easy to me. so maybe now i can indulge a bit. thanks.
WADE!

glennobrien
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Post by glennobrien » July 25th, 2014, 4:58 am

Last edited by glennobrien on March 12th, 2015, 3:17 am, edited 2 times in total.

TriciaG
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Post by TriciaG » July 25th, 2014, 5:27 am

Wow - that was pulling up a dinosaur of a thread. LOL! 8-)

Bassaga
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Post by Bassaga » July 26th, 2014, 8:24 pm

But what an awesome dinosaur! This is cool!
"In this world... you must be oh so smart, or oh so pleasant. Well, for years I was smart; I recommend pleasant."
Elwood P. Dowd, "Harvey"

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