Music to cry for

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a.r.dobbs
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Post by a.r.dobbs » October 12th, 2006, 1:11 pm

I saw The Illusionist recently (good movie) and during the opening I thought, "Wow, Phillip Glass has really influence this movie score. Hmmmm. So perfect for a music score, heavens. I love this." Of course ... it was a Phillip Glass score! :D
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Chrisczech
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Post by Chrisczech » January 29th, 2010, 6:09 am

Gesine wrote:Yes, the String Quartet is good. But I especially love Glass's Sanskrit opera, Satyagraha: http://www.philipglass.com/html/compositions/satyagraha.html
Wow - I am going to English National Opera's production of Satyagraha on March 6th at the London Coliseum.

The second of three operas I am seeing this season (Elixir of Love and Tosca being the others.)

Also going to the Barbican in February to see a film with music by Philip Glass.
[url=http://librivox.org/idle_thoughts_of_an_idle_fellow_by_jerome_k_jerome/]Idle Thoughts Of An Idle Fellow[/url] / [url=http://librivox.org/the-triumphs-of-eugene-valmont-by-robert-barr]The Triumphs Of Eugene Valmont[/url]

Nullifidian
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Post by Nullifidian » January 29th, 2010, 10:30 am

Peter Why wrote:We obviously have some minimalist fans.

Long years ago, someone at a Liberal Studies course played a minimalist piece that consisted, as far as I can remember it, of a number of overlaid series of clicks that, because of their varied rhythms, interacted in odd ways to sound like voices saying phrases and words .. a sort of audible Rorschach's test. I was given a copy of it at the time, but have lost the tape and details since then. Any suggestions?

Peter
The only thing I can think of is the Poème Symphonique for 100 Metronomes by Györgi Ligeti, but Ligeti isn't a minimalist.

I can't speak for what you have heard though. I don't hear anything in that work that sounds like voices, but I don't do pareidolia (seeing patterns in random sounds or images, like clouds) very well.

Actually, if the word "clicks" is not necessarily literal, then it could also have been one of Steve Reich's percussion pieces.

Here's a list of plausible candidates:
Music for Pieces of Wood
Drumming (Part 1 and Part 2)
Clapping Music

This isn't exhaustive, but it's just about everything I could think to pull on Youtube that would fit. It seems to me that you'd need an untuned percussion instrument, because tuned percussion instruments would be used for melody, as in Reich's Nagoya Marimbas.
Last edited by Nullifidian on January 29th, 2010, 12:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.

russiandoll
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Post by russiandoll » January 29th, 2010, 10:54 am

Chrisczech wrote:Wow - I am going to English National Opera's production of Satyagraha on March 6th at the London Coliseum.

Ooh! I went when they did it there a couple of years ago. The puppetry is quite something... but the music, in parts - it wasn't a case of not liking it exactly; but its relentless repetitiveness was actually physically/psychologically uncomfortable to me, almost like a kind of aural Chinese water torture: it made me want to clamp my hands over my ears (I think I did so, as discreetly as I could, in fact) and MAKE IT STOP!!!!! I've got some other Glass stuff on CD that I like; this just had a weirdly, mountingly, viscerally unpleasant effect on me.

Anyway, probably just me. Enjoy :D.
English is the lingua franca par excellence

Chrisczech
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Post by Chrisczech » January 29th, 2010, 11:25 am

ENO put on some great operas. I saw John Adams' Doctor Atomic there and was very impressed. Some years ago we saw Nixon In China too.

I get 2 half-price tickets as part of their access scheme for the disabled.
[url=http://librivox.org/idle_thoughts_of_an_idle_fellow_by_jerome_k_jerome/]Idle Thoughts Of An Idle Fellow[/url] / [url=http://librivox.org/the-triumphs-of-eugene-valmont-by-robert-barr]The Triumphs Of Eugene Valmont[/url]

ExEmGe
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Post by ExEmGe » January 29th, 2010, 12:30 pm

Did you see Akhnaten a few years ago? With the cast wearing prosthetic bits and pieces and making sand castles.
I used to go to the whole of the season about then. Some productions really made the whole opera make more sense and were absolutely wonderful.
Others were well, not so wonderful. But I'm afraid you can't have one without the other.
Nowadays I never get there. Pity.
Regards
Andy Minter

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Post by Chrisczech » January 29th, 2010, 4:10 pm

I have never seen Akhnaten and would love to. I have the opera on cd.

I also have two unreleased operas: Appomattox and The Fall Of The House Of Usher from live performances broadcast on radio.
[url=http://librivox.org/idle_thoughts_of_an_idle_fellow_by_jerome_k_jerome/]Idle Thoughts Of An Idle Fellow[/url] / [url=http://librivox.org/the-triumphs-of-eugene-valmont-by-robert-barr]The Triumphs Of Eugene Valmont[/url]

Peter Why
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Post by Peter Why » January 30th, 2010, 1:07 am

Nullifidian,
Thanks for those suggestions; I'll check them out. It was a long time ago now that I heard the piece, so can't rely on my memory to imitate the sound accurately, but I'll recognise it if I hear it.
Peter
"I think, therefore I am, I think." Solomon Cohen, in Terry Pratchett's Dodger

Chrisczech
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Post by Chrisczech » March 11th, 2010, 4:23 am

russiandoll wrote:
Chrisczech wrote:Wow - I am going to English National Opera's production of Satyagraha on March 6th at the London Coliseum.

Ooh! I went when they did it there a couple of years ago. The puppetry is quite something... but the music, in parts - it wasn't a case of not liking it exactly; but its relentless repetitiveness was actually physically/psychologically uncomfortable to me, almost like a kind of aural Chinese water torture: it made me want to clamp my hands over my ears (I think I did so, as discreetly as I could, in fact) and MAKE IT STOP!!!!! I've got some other Glass stuff on CD that I like; this just had a weirdly, mountingly, viscerally unpleasant effect on me.

Anyway, probably just me. Enjoy :D.
My wife and I thoroughly enjoyed Satyagraha. Visually quite stunning and i found the music excellent. The third act got a little too repetitive at times, and did not seem to be developing very much, but overall I was very impressed with the whole production.

The Guardian review:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2010/feb/28/satyagraha-eno-review



The Elixir Of Love was very good too. Jonathan Miller set it in an American mid-west 50's diner, and it worked surprisingly well. Andrew Shore (one of my favourite baritones) sang Dulcamara. The American libretto incorporated many references to American 50's music and slang, but mainly represented the spirit of the original very well.
[url=http://librivox.org/idle_thoughts_of_an_idle_fellow_by_jerome_k_jerome/]Idle Thoughts Of An Idle Fellow[/url] / [url=http://librivox.org/the-triumphs-of-eugene-valmont-by-robert-barr]The Triumphs Of Eugene Valmont[/url]

Peter Why
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Post by Peter Why » March 11th, 2010, 6:01 am

I did get to Satyagraha at the Coliseum; I was only able to stay for the first act, as my arthritic knee caused me too much pain with the very cramped leg room.

I loved the music and singing, though to my mind the two male leads didn't have poweful enough voices (and the second one to come in didn't seem to be able to reach his low notes comfortably ... though I suppose this could have been Phillip Glass playing about with musical conventions).

However, I found what was going on on stage so incomprehensible and distracting that I spent most of the time with my eyes closed.

Odd how different people react so differently.

The link to the Guardian review didn't work for me.

Peter
"I think, therefore I am, I think." Solomon Cohen, in Terry Pratchett's Dodger

KiltedDragon
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Post by KiltedDragon » March 11th, 2010, 7:55 am

This may only apply to those in the same case as mine. I lost my first wife to cancer just about the same time Bruce Springsteen's The Rising came out. The song You're Missing will bring me to tears everytime.
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Post by BellonaTimes » March 13th, 2010, 12:20 am

Aretha Franklin's Ain't No Way, Paul Young's version of Every Time You Go Away, Kate Bush's This Woman's Work, Springsteen's Philadelphia, Thea Hopkins' Jesus On The Wire... :cry:
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Post by Debdasmptr » March 16th, 2010, 5:43 am

I have heard the music so many times, it may not sound good but it has good moral and good sense of humour also. It carries a good message.


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neckertb
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Post by neckertb » March 23rd, 2010, 6:49 am

KiltedDragon wrote:This may only apply to those in the same case as mine. I lost my first wife to cancer just about the same time Bruce Springsteen's The Rising came out. The song You're Missing will bring me to tears everytime.
When I was a lonely teenager in complete rebellion, my cat died of cancer (I do realise it is not the same, but it was my closest friend) and since then I just cannot hear Mozart's requiem without crying.
I also recently discovered "Gloriosa" by Yatsuhide Ito, actually got to play it with my orchestra, as my last concert with them two days ago, and I shiver every time. This will probably again be a piece that I cannot listen to anymore because it brings too many feelings...
And once in a while music will make me cry without any particular reason. :cry:
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