We're recording WHAT??

Everything except LibriVox (yes, this is where knitting gets discussed. Now includes non-LV Volunteers Wanted projects)
Post Reply
TriciaG
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 41771
Joined: June 15th, 2008, 10:30 pm
Location: Toronto, ON (but Minnesotan to age 32)

Post by TriciaG » January 15th, 2010, 3:51 pm

You mean that word that's all in caps, and looks like something the Nazi men would have been? :lol:
Nonfiction: Human Radiation Experiments HERE
Insomnia Collection!
Experiences in the Panama Canal Zone during construction: Zone Policeman 88

Availle
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 16159
Joined: August 1st, 2009, 11:30 pm
Contact:

Post by Availle » January 15th, 2010, 4:07 pm

Yes, I think he meant that one... :lol:

Although, the Nazi men would not have been (it's not common practice in Europe), but the Jews would...

Sorry if I did not get your joke, it's too early for me for cognitive anythings...
Cheers,
Ava.

--
AvailleAudio.com

TriciaG
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 41771
Joined: June 15th, 2008, 10:30 pm
Location: Toronto, ON (but Minnesotan to age 32)

Post by TriciaG » January 15th, 2010, 4:14 pm

The first word in the poem is a negative. So Nazi men would have been. The Jews would've NOT been, which would be a double negative. :lol:
Nonfiction: Human Radiation Experiments HERE
Insomnia Collection!
Experiences in the Panama Canal Zone during construction: Zone Policeman 88

Availle
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 16159
Joined: August 1st, 2009, 11:30 pm
Contact:

Post by Availle » January 15th, 2010, 4:21 pm

:oops:

Let me repeat: It's too early here for cognitive anything...

:oops:
Cheers,
Ava.

--
AvailleAudio.com

annise
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 31216
Joined: April 3rd, 2008, 3:55 am
Location: Melbourne,Australia

Post by annise » January 15th, 2010, 4:22 pm

Its not a book title but every time I see Elli's signature I wonder how

"Das Waldbauernbübel von Peter Rosegger" can possibly translate as "The House of Arden by E. Nesbit"

and then the penny drops :D

Anne

Lucy_k_p
Posts: 2924
Joined: February 16th, 2009, 7:19 am
Location: Bath, UK
Contact:

Post by Lucy_k_p » January 15th, 2010, 5:37 pm

I really am hesitant to mention this one.. but I was going over the Fortnightly Poem and the first line....
See the bloopers thread. Although it was the same word in the last verse that got me.
So little space, so much to say.

neerajanagarajan
Posts: 4117
Joined: February 6th, 2009, 8:21 am
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Contact:

Post by neerajanagarajan » January 15th, 2010, 11:20 pm

TriciaG wrote:The first word in the poem is a negative. So Nazi men would have been. The Jews would've NOT been, which would be a double negative. :lol:
:lol:

Cori
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 12150
Joined: November 22nd, 2005, 10:22 am
Location: Britain
Contact:

Post by Cori » January 30th, 2010, 2:23 am

Since we're recording *EVERY* work in the public domain, eventually we'll get round to this gem currently causing raised eyebrows at Distributed Proofreaders: http://www.pgdp.net/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=26044
There's honestly no such thing as a stupid question -- but I'm afraid I can't rule out giving a stupid answer : : To Posterity and Beyond!

russiandoll
Posts: 2325
Joined: January 23rd, 2008, 12:26 pm
Location: UK

Post by russiandoll » January 30th, 2010, 2:52 am

Cori wrote:...this gem currently causing raised eyebrows at Distributed Proofreaders: http://www.pgdp.net/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=26044
Login required :(
Is it so good it's worth registering to see?
English is the lingua franca par excellence

Steampunk
Posts: 2466
Joined: January 23rd, 2008, 1:41 pm
Location: Exile

Post by Steampunk » January 30th, 2010, 8:37 am

The title in question is The Baculum in the Chipmunks of Western North America by White, John A..

A "baculum" is this certain bone. . .

I assume it's a small study on the subject. :)


Jim

aradlaw
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 13516
Joined: July 14th, 2008, 4:54 pm
Location: Nottawasaga Bay, Ontario
Contact:

Post by aradlaw » January 30th, 2010, 8:54 am

That's the sort of subject that my email filter sends to junk mail :P
Too much information follows >>>
Wikipedia wrote:It is absent in humans, equids, marsupials, lagomorphs, hyenas, and cetaceans (whales, dolphins, and porpoises) among others.
:shock:
David Lawrence

* Weekly & Fortnightly Poetry - Check out the Short Works forum for the latest projects!

Nullifidian
Posts: 477
Joined: January 17th, 2010, 9:18 pm
Location: San Diego, CA, USA

Post by Nullifidian » January 31st, 2010, 2:04 pm

Steampunk wrote:The title in question is The Baculum in the Chipmunks of Western North America by White, John A..

A "baculum" is this certain bone. . .

I assume it's a small study on the subject. :)


Jim
Actually, it is. It was apparently published in 1953 in the in-house journal of the University of Kansas' Natural History Museum. (My alma mater! Go Jayhawks! :thumbs:) It's just 20 pages long, and at least two pages of that are probably references.

Titles like that are commonplace in scientific papers.

My favorite scientific title is probably "Underwater Bipedal Locomotion by Octopuses in Disguise", a real article that appeared in Science a few years ago.

Cori
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 12150
Joined: November 22nd, 2005, 10:22 am
Location: Britain
Contact:

Post by Cori » February 1st, 2010, 12:03 pm

[HISTORY] History of the Inquisition of Spam


(Actually ... Spain.)


(nullifidian ... not octopi..? :twisted: And my current favourite paper: The case of the disappearing teaspoons: longitudinal cohort study of the displacement of teaspoons in an Australian research institute.)
There's honestly no such thing as a stupid question -- but I'm afraid I can't rule out giving a stupid answer : : To Posterity and Beyond!

Jc
Posts: 3541
Joined: May 22nd, 2007, 10:25 pm
Location: Montreal, Qc, Canada

Post by Jc » February 1st, 2010, 12:44 pm

Nullifidian wrote: My favorite scientific title is probably "Underwater Bipedal Locomotion by Octopuses in Disguise", a real article that appeared in Science a few years ago.
I guess they met this little guy
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OByt5ISrzJs
Cori wrote:nullifidian ... not octopi..? :twisted:
Same reason plural of virus is viruses. My world fell apart when I found out...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plural_form_of_words_ending_in_-us
Put yourself in the Readers' Accents Table. See this post.
(Busy real life & traveling, sorry if not here often.)

Steampunk
Posts: 2466
Joined: January 23rd, 2008, 1:41 pm
Location: Exile

Post by Steampunk » February 1st, 2010, 1:48 pm

Jc wrote:Same reason plural of virus is viruses. My world fell apart when I found out...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plural_form_of_words_ending_in_-us
Webster's New World College Dictionary lists octopuses, octopi and octopodes (in that order).
Hmmm. Not Latin, but Latinized Greek. Who knew... I rather like "octopodes" :)


Jim
There is no human problem which could not be solved if people would simply do as I advise.
-- Gore Vidal
_________________
My Projects

Post Reply