Getting fit

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Gesine
Posts: 14151
Joined: December 13th, 2005, 4:16 am

Post by Gesine » February 21st, 2006, 2:44 am

No, no cycling... don't have a bike, and Malta is not really suited to it. But I'm planning to row, to get a bit more resistance into the mix, not just aerobic. Need to build up my upper body muscles a bit, otherwise I'll have trouble hoisting the sail when the boat is finally in the water! :)

Heather, sorry, I missed your post! Great that you'll join in! The thing is to stick to the 'every other day' routine religiously, then it *will* work! The first couple of weeks can be painful but suddenly one get to this stage where one goes out, feels the wind in one's back and everything is just right, and seems effortless... like a wolf loping smoothly through the forest... it feels like one could run on forever and not get tired... :)

Izze and Paula, sorry about your lungs! But exercising inside works nicely too, of course. I get exercise-induced asthma when I first start running, and it's much worse when it's cold. I have to be careful to breathe through my nose.

Kri - walking is a good thing. Every little bit helps... When I lived in Central London, I used to walk (fast) everywhere, about 30-60 minutes per day. I was quite fit even though I didn't do anything else. Within Valletta, the biggest distance is 10 minutes' walk, but then it's very hilly - steep hills, too.
"Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination circles the world." Albert Einstein

pberinstein
Posts: 550
Joined: September 26th, 2005, 5:47 pm

Post by pberinstein » February 21st, 2006, 9:28 am

Gesine wrote: Izze and Paula, sorry about your lungs! But exercising inside works nicely too, of course. I get exercise-induced asthma when I first start running, and it's much worse when it's cold. I have to be careful to breathe through my nose.
I don't have a problem with my lungs, Gesine. Only when around people who are wearing perfume.

:D
Paula B
The Writing Show, where writing is always the story
http://www.writingshow.com

Guest

Post by Guest » February 21st, 2006, 11:12 am

Thanks for the encouragement, Gesine. I'll make today day one (if I post this here, it means I actually have to go out, LOL!).

heatherausten
Posts: 476
Joined: December 30th, 2005, 9:12 pm
Location: Utah, USA

Post by heatherausten » February 21st, 2006, 11:13 am

Oops, forgot to login. The above post is from me, heatherausten!
~Heather~

marlodianne
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Joined: December 24th, 2005, 10:53 am
Location: Prince Edward Island, Canada
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Post by marlodianne » February 21st, 2006, 11:44 am

*waves at Gestine*

I'm the one. Severe allergies and asthma, among many other joys. My carbon is not well put together, but I make do :)
Marlo Dianne
Writer, Artist, Wondergeek
forbiddendragon.blogspot.com

"We live as though the world was as it should be, to show it what it can be." --Angel

Gesine
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Joined: December 13th, 2005, 4:16 am

Post by Gesine » February 21st, 2006, 3:40 pm

Oops, sorry Paula and Marlo! :)

Half of my family has respiratory problems - asthma, hayfever, dust allergies etc. I'm lucky that so far I've not had anything like that - I hate having a cold and hayfever would just kill me. And my occasional hour of exercise-induced asthma (when I'm unfit) is enough for me... so, I sympathise with you! And with Paula, too. Over-use of perfume is vile for people with sensitive noses. Problem is that when people get used to their perfume, they need a lot in order to smell it, I think.
"Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination circles the world." Albert Einstein

Gesine
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Joined: December 13th, 2005, 4:16 am

Post by Gesine » February 21st, 2006, 3:48 pm

So, second run today. I didn't make my initial goal of going before breakfast (that's usually best for me - it gets it out of the way, and, once it's over, the endorphins ensure a good morning (I'm not a morning person).

Stupidly, I forgot to stretch after my first run, and now suffer the ill-effects. On the rest day yesterday I felt very stiff, and this morning my leg muscles were aching.

I valiantly went out, started more slowly today and, though it was hard, got through the run (intervals of 5 minutes running and 2.5 mins walking) okay. When I got home, however, I felt slightly dizzy and so knackered that I had to lie down a few minutes. My whole body ached, including back and arms. I stretched this time, and began to feel better after a while, but I'll be glad to have a rest day tomorrow.

The first couple of weeks are always really hard for me - I think it's a shock to the system. If I'd started the programme more slowly, it'd be less bad, but I'll manage now. I'd advise against doing the same, though ;)

Heather, let us know how you got on! :)
"Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination circles the world." Albert Einstein

pberinstein
Posts: 550
Joined: September 26th, 2005, 5:47 pm

Post by pberinstein » February 21st, 2006, 3:55 pm

It's frustrating to have to start slowly, Gesine, but if you can stand it, it will be worth it in reduced pain and fatigue. I resumed my regimen last June and have been building up way more slowly than before. The good news is that I've barely missed a session in all that time.

I think once you pass a certain age, which I suppose is different for all of us, things just take time. I long for the days when I could tone up in a month and lose a ton of weight in a couple of weeks. Ha!
Paula B
The Writing Show, where writing is always the story
http://www.writingshow.com

heatherausten
Posts: 476
Joined: December 30th, 2005, 9:12 pm
Location: Utah, USA

Post by heatherausten » February 21st, 2006, 6:08 pm

Way to go at starting your routine, Gesine. I agree with Paula, though. You might want to start a bit more gently to give your body time to get accustomed to it.

I got back from my own first day of exercise just a few minutes ago. I forgot that I'd lost my watch, so I just gauged a distance that seemed reasonable. Here are the three things I learned from from this walk (I'm doing the two-week buildup):

1) Oh boy, am I out of shape.
2) I need a new pair of exercise shoes. The pair I bought this summer are completely worthless.
3) It was FUN! After I reached the half-way point, it was downhill and I enjoyed the invigorating exercise and the beautiful wintery scenery.

I'll be glad for a day break to let my blisters heal, and hopefully buy a new pair of shoes.
~Heather~

Gesine
Posts: 14151
Joined: December 13th, 2005, 4:16 am

Post by Gesine » February 22nd, 2006, 2:42 pm

Poor Heather, I'm sorry about your blisters! Spend a reasonable amount of money on your shoes - they are important. Once you start running, it's recommended that you change your running shoes every 500 miles or so (although it really depends on the way you run) because the cushioning wears out, even before the shoes 'look bad.'

If you enjoy running and think you'll continue after the programme, eventually you may like to invest in a proper pair of running shoes. It's worth going to a running shop (or good sports shop) for that. They have mats that you run over barefoot (in the shop), which take a digital footprint. You can see like in a thermal diagramme, where you land on you foot, which parts are most exposed to pressure etc. Most people under- or overpronate, i.e. they land more on one side of their feet than on the other. Often it shows in normal shoes, which are worn out in certain places more than others. If you do that, you'll need more (or less) cushioning in your shoes to help balance it out.

I got a pair of running shoes in the sale that way, and they were about the third of the price of normal 'trendy' trainers. They feel good, certainly the best shoes I've ever run in.

Happy to say I feel much better today - yesterday was one of those off-days, I think. Today I have hardly any muscle ache left. I'll continue with my programme - I've done it this way before and it works for me. Third run tomorrow! :)
"Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination circles the world." Albert Einstein

pberinstein
Posts: 550
Joined: September 26th, 2005, 5:47 pm

Post by pberinstein » February 22nd, 2006, 2:55 pm

Yes, and make sure you wear the proper socks to prevent blisters!
Paula B
The Writing Show, where writing is always the story
http://www.writingshow.com

heatherausten
Posts: 476
Joined: December 30th, 2005, 9:12 pm
Location: Utah, USA

Post by heatherausten » February 22nd, 2006, 9:06 pm

Gesine: Yes, do go with whatever feels good to you.
Paula: Dumb question, but what kind of socks should I look for/wear for exercising?
~Heather~

pberinstein
Posts: 550
Joined: September 26th, 2005, 5:47 pm

Post by pberinstein » February 23rd, 2006, 10:02 am

The socks should be thick enough to protect your feet, Heather. Little thin socks aren't good enough. They should also be cotton (maybe polypropylene works too--I'm not sure). No wool.

Actually, I just looked on the Web, and some stores are advertising thin socks made of wicking material, so I guess that's okay. For my money, I don't like to run or do fitness walking with thin socks.

Paula
Paula B
The Writing Show, where writing is always the story
http://www.writingshow.com

Gesine
Posts: 14151
Joined: December 13th, 2005, 4:16 am

Post by Gesine » February 23rd, 2006, 3:46 pm

You can get special running socks which have thicker soles - usually with some kind of 'frottee' material in them. That's supposed to help absorb shock. My partner, who runs long distance, has tried a lot of brands and some are better than others. I run in thin cotton socks and have never had any problems. I suppose it depends also on how sensitive you are, how you run/walk, and how your shoes fit. Wicking is good of course, but technical gear is expensive and not really necessary, in my opinion, if one is just starting out.

Wear any well-fitting socks (shouldn't bunch up anywhere, for instance) made out of cotton and you'll probably be okay, Heather.
"Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination circles the world." Albert Einstein

Gesine
Posts: 14151
Joined: December 13th, 2005, 4:16 am

Post by Gesine » February 24th, 2006, 10:17 am

Well, I'm sad to say that my third run was thwarted (don't ask) so I couldn't go yesterday. However, I made up for it by going before breakfast today! And that in spite of the rotten weather - it was drizzling and later raining.

Reminded me again, though, that really it doesn't matter if it rains, once one is out. It certainly hampers the will to go, but once one is out, it's actually quite nice when it rains. Refreshing. And one feels kind of self-righteous and smug, splashing along and hurtling past all the umbrella people who are swearing about the downpour! :)

No major problems, no more muscle ache - I think I've made it. Not that it wasn't hard - it was - but I think I'm getting into a rhythm once more. And I'm making some progress with my Italian!
"Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination circles the world." Albert Einstein

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