Modern books that you wish we could record.

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KATWAL
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Post by KATWAL » June 30th, 2006, 12:33 pm

Thought of another one.

Flute of the Smoking Mirror by Frances Gillmor

gives great insight into the ancient Aztecs


Kathy

gypsygirl
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Post by gypsygirl » July 1st, 2006, 5:13 am

The Little Prince has always been one of my favourites (in any language). We did a version of it at the local theatre and I got to play the fox. Great fun!
Karen S.

shortcircuit
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Post by shortcircuit » July 3rd, 2006, 4:09 pm

Hm.... Wistful thinking...

I'd love to read:

Chronicles of Narnia by CS Lewis
The Once and Future King by TH White
the short story Sonata for Harp and Bicycle by Joan Aiken
Any of the books by Patricia C. Wrede....
[size=75][color=#63b8ff]There is no frigate like a book
To take us lands away. -
Emily Dickinson
...
Maria
...
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Starlite
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Post by Starlite » July 3rd, 2006, 4:44 pm

shortcircuit wrote:Hm.... Wistful thinking...

I'd love to read:

Chronicles of Narnia by CS Lewis
The Once and Future King by TH White
the short story Sonata for Harp and Bicycle by Joan Aiken
Any of the books by Patricia C. Wrede....
I Actualy broke down and bought (YES BOUGHT) the audio books for the whole Narnia series! :D
"Reasonable people adapt themselves to the world. Unreasonable
people attempt to adapt the world to themselves. All progress,
therefore, depends on unreasonable people." George Bernard Shaw

gypsygirl
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Post by gypsygirl » July 3rd, 2006, 7:03 pm

When I was still teaching, we had a twenty minute homeroom period that was usually a reading period (unless admin had papers for us to hand out).
They were supposed to read quietly to themselves, but once a week I would read aloud to my kids, and the first year I did this I read them the Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. These were tenth graders (age 15 or so), and they loved it!
Karen S.

anna
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Post by anna » July 4th, 2006, 4:43 am

"Soldaat van Oranje" by Erik Hazelhoff Roelzema
Literal translation is Soldier of Orange.

It's the autobiography of Erik H. Roelzema of what he did during the second world war.
He almost single handedly set up the english side of the Dutch resistance, became a Mosquito pilot for a pathfinder squadron and ended up being the aide of the Dutch Queen at the time.

Masyukun
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Post by Masyukun » July 8th, 2006, 6:12 pm

Piano: Guided Sight-Reading, by Leonhard Deutsch (1959)
Fundamentalisms, ed. by Christopher H. Partridge
All of Robert Heinlein and Isaac Asmiov's novels.
Reading is thinking with someone else's head instead of one's own.

shortcircuit
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Post by shortcircuit » July 8th, 2006, 8:26 pm

I thought of another one. Or five, actually.

Susan Cooper's the Dark is Rising sequence.

I loved that series from start to finish.... and I still cry at the ending.
[size=75][color=#63b8ff]There is no frigate like a book
To take us lands away. -
Emily Dickinson
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Maria
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Peter Why
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Post by Peter Why » July 9th, 2006, 1:24 am

Yes, I loved The Dark is Rising, and I, too, cried for the lost love and the gift of forgetfulness. I think my favourite was the one set in Wales ... straight from the Mabinogion and the White Goddess.

Peter
"I think, therefore I am, I think." Solomon Cohen, in Terry Pratchett's Dodger

Starlite
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Post by Starlite » July 9th, 2006, 3:35 am

shortcircuit wrote: and I still cry at the ending.
Peter wrote: and I, too, cried for the lost love and the gift of forgetfulness

WOW I love that I'm not the only one who cries when they read. And MEN TOO!! :)
"Reasonable people adapt themselves to the world. Unreasonable
people attempt to adapt the world to themselves. All progress,
therefore, depends on unreasonable people." George Bernard Shaw

strangebrooch
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Post by strangebrooch » July 16th, 2006, 11:36 pm

I sorely regret that 1066 and All That was published just a few years too late (i.e., in 1930) to be in the public domain. I have a faintly unhealthy love for that book.
[size=84]For if hevene be on this erthe, and ese to any soule,
It is in cloister or in scole, by many skiles I fynde.
-- William Langland, [i]Piers Plowman[/i] X.299-300
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Cloud Mountain
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Post by Cloud Mountain » July 17th, 2006, 3:05 pm

Re: Tao Te Ching

I'm never sure if comments like the one's that follow should go here or should be directed elsewhere. Anyway...

The following is both informative and contains opinion.

There are several translations of the Tao Te Ching that are no longer under copyright, but I don't believe any are of worth to produce (except as curiosities, as we are very quite grateful for them as pioneering/introducing words.*) [Is anyone cringing yet?] Such translations were inspired when the "West" was first introduced to this classic (Ching/Jing) and so tell us more about the viewpoints of the translators than of the mother lode within the the work itself --the original text. Many are infused with Western religious notions. Now after 150+ years of Easter studies, we have a much better idea of the Tao Te Ching in an historical and cross-cultural perspective. Which is to say, that this book would be best done in the original language but I doubt anyone but a scholar could do that, as our guess at the language as written is speculative.

Yes, this might raise the ugly head of censorship and maybe its cousin elitism. But I think that a knee jerk reaction and I hope to explain why. We choose to read here those books we're interested in. Some we can?t relate to while others are beacons. I for one wouldn't want to be part of a project that might start a new cycle of misunderstandings of this profound work of cultural genius, which is to say it was probably not written by a single person (referred to as Lao Tse) but is but the captured wisdom of a very old Chinese tradition (4000-2500 past.) At the same time I would believe such a project to be a waste of both the . Even if we were in 100% agreement, how might we judge the worthiness of a translation of an alien language? The only reason James Legge?s translations of the Chinese classics are still around is because they ARE in the public domain and so are a publisher?s free ride --except for production costs.

Translations into English (or any other language) that are contemporary translations are most likely true to the original, as they more often than not speak to the listener and are for the most part a good listening of the original, as they are usually done with the ?authors? approval. I think we can allow ourselves to be safely judgmental about this. Most of the works available here are in the original language and volunteers at LibriVox are rightfully non-judgmental about them. Different strokes, etc. The King James Version of the Bible, for instance IS a great work of translation. (Billy Shakespeare himself worked on it.) AND it is also 300 years part of our cultural heritage. Many of us memorized portions of it in childhood and beyond.

Yawn.

Okay. I'm prepared. Send your responses.

* I'm also thinking of those translations of Asian texts read by the American transcendentalists. Emerson, et al, had some small inkling of what was going on there, but he was often way off base and did much to promote misunderstandings for a century or more afterwards.)
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shortcircuit
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Post by shortcircuit » July 17th, 2006, 3:08 pm

Odd_Bloke wrote:
  • Most of C.S. Forester's stuff (mainly the Hornblower series).
    Patrick O'Brian's Aubrey/Maturin series (the basis of "Master & Commander" starring Russell Crowe)
    Bernard Cornwell's Sharpe series
Can you see what kinda fiction I like yet? :P

Dan
Hornblower!

Hehe.... I love all those books you listed!
[size=75][color=#63b8ff]There is no frigate like a book
To take us lands away. -
Emily Dickinson
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Maria
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kayray
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Post by kayray » July 17th, 2006, 3:37 pm

All 4 Mary Poppins books! Also published just a few years too late. Sigh.

I'm devoted to The Dark is Rising series. My favorites are the first three books, and especially "The Dark is Rising". I read it every year around Christmas :) My dad discovered the series, actually. I vividly remember him sitting, reading, and suddenly saying "Hey, kids, this is a great book!" and he read us the scene where Will wakes early on his birthday, leaves the house, and everything is different... Ooooooo chills!
Kara
http://kayray.org/
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"Mary wished to say something very sensible into her Zoom H2 Handy Recorder, but knew not how." -- Jane Austen (& Kara)

shortcircuit
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Post by shortcircuit » July 17th, 2006, 3:53 pm

The first one I read was the Grey King. I was walking around in the children's section of my library and I thought it looked interesting. I was hooked as soon I read it and had to search for the other books in the series. I love interlibrary loan.

My favorite book of the series is probably Silver on the Tree. I love it even though it still makes me cry. I even started learning Welsh because of it (I still have the program somewhere....)
[size=75][color=#63b8ff]There is no frigate like a book
To take us lands away. -
Emily Dickinson
...
Maria
...
[url=http://librivox.org/wiki/moin.cgi/MariaMorabe/]My Wiki Page[/url]
[/color]
[/size]

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