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Post Posted:: September 13th, 2006, 5:10 pm 

Joined: December 28th, 2005, 8:36 pm
Posts: 4284
Location: Redwood City, CA
thistlechick wrote:
i'll probably make some zucchini brownies soon too... this is how i like my vegetables... mixed with chocolate *grins*


Wow. That sounds FANTASTIC.

One of the things I love about zucchini bread is how moist it stays. That in brownies... mmm.... :9:

Please post recipe?

-Catharine

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Post Posted:: September 13th, 2006, 7:48 pm 

Joined: November 30th, 2005, 12:14 pm
Posts: 6244
Location: Michigan
ceastman wrote:
Please post recipe?


I don't have a specific receipe ... just google "zucchini brownies" and see what you find... otherwise, i think you can just use a boxed brownie mix and replace the oil with zucchini... not sure if it's a one-to-one exchange or not, though... but heck, what's the worst that could happen, right?

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Post Posted:: September 13th, 2006, 7:52 pm 

Joined: November 30th, 2005, 12:14 pm
Posts: 6244
Location: Michigan
kristin wrote:
My mom sent zucchini bars a couple weeks ago. She used a bread recipe but frosted them with a cream cheese frosting. Really good. She usually does it with pumpkin but ....


Speaking of pumpkin.... the best cookies I've ever made were a recipe called Pummies... back when I was in college and made cookies ALL THE TIME!!! ... they were soft, pumpkin drop cookies... but one time we put chocolate chips in them.... to die for!!! ok... yes, I'm exaggerating... but a really, excellent, unexpected combination... I'll see if I can track down the recipe... there is something about the name "Chocolate Chip Pummies" that makes me feel all warm and fuzzy....

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Post Posted:: September 13th, 2006, 11:08 pm 
I hope I'm not ruining anyones cookie conversation, but I would like to share with you a thing I like to call "Juhos Special". It is a very tasty dish, which I like to do very often. This will propably shock every real expert on the field of foods, but let's start.

The things you need:

1. About 400 grams of sliced (don't know if slices is the right word, but the kind that is in "threads") pork, or if you prefer, chicken or turkey. (Preferably marinated.)
2. A can of tuna
3. Small shrimps
4. Mushrooms (in pieces preferably)
5. Pasta (whichever you prefer).
6. Water
7. A can of Pepsi or Coca Cola
8. Flour
9. Butter

And this is what you do with them:

1. Start cooking the pasta. Once the pasta is in boiling water, move to phase 2
2. Melt a fairly large piece of butter on a pan, then throw in the meat
3. Once the meat is ready, throw in some flour and mix, until the flour has gathered all of the melted butter and form a thick layer around the meat threads
4. Throw in some water, and mix.
5. Throw in the mushoorms, shrimp and tuna.
6. Poor in about 1/4 of the pepsi or coca cola (or more if you prefer)
7. The pasta should be ready by now, so rince it and throw it in with the rest
8. Spice it up with some pepper and mix
9. Let it withdraw a few minutes, then mix again and serve.

As you can see, it is not the styliest of meals, but is fun to do and tastes very good. The amounts of things aren't very specific, since it's mainly the preference of the maker that sets them.


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Post Posted:: September 14th, 2006, 2:06 am 

Joined: December 13th, 2005, 4:16 am
Posts: 14186
Wow. That sounds amazing, raezel. If I ate meat, I'd definitely try it - I love the idea of the coke in there! :)
Quote:
Gesine, if I'm ever in the neighborhood, can I come eat at your house?

It's said the world is getting smaller!! Maybe we could meet at Peter's?

I could bring the green fried tomatoes! (for a southern cooking contribution).

Kat

Absolutely, Kat! Green fried tomatoes sound lovely, I've only had them once in New Orleans. And I'd love to eat at Peter's some day - have a feeling there's a great talent lurking there (even though the thought of ruining a perfectly good cheese on toast with ketchup is grating).

We don't get many zucchini/courgettes here, but baby marrow season has just started...
I used to eat at a place for lunch where they made zucchini pancakes - more like small fritters, with lots of zucchini in them. They were delicious, and even better with some sour cream/yoghurt, like blini, or with a tomato sauce.

Betsie, could you post your zucchini bread recipe? We gave away our breadmaker, but make bread occasionally. Just found a lovely recipe for Greek olive bread.

Tomorrow we're having a dinner party. It's going to be simple: carrot soup with coriander to start, then Lampuki (a local fish which is very good, called dolphin fish in English I think) with roasted peppers and aubergines, and as a dessert baked peaches with macaroon crumble (the peaches are still gorgeous here, and one can get freshly baked macaroons in all the little bakeries they have here). I've never made this, but it's easy - crumble the macaroons, add egg, flour etc, and pile in the peach halves, then stick in the oven for a while (also works with tinned peaches). I like it because it's quick and simple and not too heavy.

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Post Posted:: September 14th, 2006, 12:15 pm 

Joined: November 30th, 2005, 12:14 pm
Posts: 6244
Location: Michigan
Zucchini bread is really more like spice cake... I don't have a magic recipe that I use, but just use whatever I find when I google it... I just found this page that has several recipes for you: http://www.bbonline.com/recipe/breads.html

I especially like using walnuts =)

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Post Posted:: September 14th, 2006, 12:29 pm 

Joined: June 1st, 2006, 10:47 am
Posts: 4622
Location: Des Moines
Here's my mom's zucchini bread recipe:

3 eggs - slightly beaten
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/4 teaspoon baking powder
2 cups grated zucchini
3 cups flour
1 tsp baking soda
1 cup vegetable oil
2 tablespoons vanilla
3 tsp cinnamon

Mix together. Pour into 2 loaf pans. Bake at 350F for 1 hour.


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Post Posted:: September 14th, 2006, 1:21 pm 

Joined: December 13th, 2005, 4:16 am
Posts: 14186
Thank you! I'll try that sometime.

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Post Posted:: September 14th, 2006, 2:56 pm 

Joined: April 30th, 2006, 2:17 pm
Posts: 16693
Location: Thunder Bay Ontario, Canada
kristin wrote:
Here's my mom's zucchini bread recipe:

3 eggs - slightly beaten
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/4 teaspoon baking powder
2 cups grated zucchini
3 cups flour
1 tsp baking soda
1 cup vegetable oil
2 tablespoons vanilla
3 tsp cinnamon

Mix together. Pour into 2 loaf pans. Bake at 350F for 1 hour.



Now if you want realy amazing zucchini bread. Replace one cup cocoa for one cup flour....... Even my kids will eat it..... :D

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Post Posted:: September 14th, 2006, 4:08 pm 

Joined: May 17th, 2006, 2:22 pm
Posts: 150
Location: Calhoun, Kentucky
I just hate it when I sound like a dummy but...

1 cup sweetened type cocoa or non-sweetened baking cocoa?

Kat

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Post Posted:: September 14th, 2006, 4:10 pm 

Joined: April 30th, 2006, 2:17 pm
Posts: 16693
Location: Thunder Bay Ontario, Canada
KATWAL wrote:
I just hate it when I sound like a dummy but...

1 cup sweetened type cocoa or non-sweetened baking cocoa?

Kat


NON sweetened baking cocoa. You can add a little more sugar if you like but its not needed. (depends on your sweet tooth) :P

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people attempt to adapt the world to themselves. All progress,
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Post Posted:: December 23rd, 2009, 6:36 am 

Joined: November 24th, 2005, 3:54 am
Posts: 3989
Location: Chigwell (North-East London, U.K.)
I think this thread needed to be revived! Here's a recipe I've worked out for a sweetish chilli sauce, with no added sugar. Apologies for the mixture of millilitres and ounces.


1 large dessert apple, skinned, cored and coarsely chopped
6 ounces or so of bulbous chillies (the ones I use are about the size of the top two joints of my thumb), stem end and excess pithy core removed.; sliced
1 medium onion, peeled and coarsely chopped.
half a large red pepper (bell pepper / capsicum), cored with pith removed; coarsely chopped
1 rounded teaspoon of dry english mustard
1 rounded teaspoon of thyme
About 350 ml of white (distilled) vinegar.

Optional:
You could also add an inch or so of peeled and chopped or grated fresh ginger
About a tablespoon of finely chopped birds-eye/rocket chillies to really pump up the heat.


Simmer the apple, onion, pepper (and optional ginger) in the vinegar until the apple is soft. Add the thyme, and the mustard (thinned with vinegar).

Run in a blender ... not until completely smooth: you should still have the chilli seeds and bits of chilli and pepper skin visible. Thin with more vinegar if necessary. (Optional: add chopped fresh chillies now.) Return to the saucepan and bring to the boil for a few moments.

Bottle. If you’re just using clean bottles or jars, allow the sauce to cool to hand-hot, and store the sauce in the fridge. Or, ideally, you should first have sterilised the bottles in a pressure cooker or by washing them and baking them dry in the oven; in this case, allow them to cool a little and bottle the sauce hot.

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Post Posted:: June 10th, 2010, 7:59 am 

Joined: November 30th, 2008, 9:57 pm
Posts: 870
Location: Vancouver Island BC
Here is a thread that needs reviving!

Now that summer is here (at least in some places) we need to add a few hot weather recipes.

Easy Iced Coffee
You do need to plan this a bit in advance. Make a shot of espresso and sweeten to taste. Add enough milk ( I use 1%) to make 250 ml, 1 cup. Pour into ice cube tray and freeze till solid. I make 2 or 3 trays the night before.
To make: Put as many coffee ice cubes into a blender as you like. I use a whole tray to make a huge one. Add enough milk to cover, and blend till all the coffee cubes are gone and the mixture is homogeneous. That's it. The only ingredients are coffee milk and sugar. Much better than all the thickeners you get from commercial iced coffees.
I went to that huge international coffee place and bought their large reusable iced coffee cup, 591 ml or 20 oz. Its perfect for a whole tray of coffee cubes.

--Hazel Image

ps I'm drinking one as I type this

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Post Posted:: June 20th, 2017, 11:40 pm 

Joined: November 24th, 2005, 3:54 am
Posts: 3989
Location: Chigwell (North-East London, U.K.)
Reviving again! When I was a child we used to buy hemispherical, dark, spicy, glazed fruit buns, which I've not seen in the bakers for a very long time. The modern "hot cross bun" is a pale, weak imitation. Last year I decided to search around for any suitable recipes and try to recreate the original buns. I think I've come very close. I've made these three times now, so the recipe is still being modified (and is very detailed); when I gave the recipe to my sister, she told me that she made a batch, and liked them so much that she made another batch the next day.

Here's what they look like (they're a bit small; the final proving probably wasn't long enough): https://www.mediafire.com/?p2lzy7planupdf5 (just click on the View button near the top right of the screen).

(The recipe is mainly from “The Book of Buns” by Jane Mason, but I've modified it. I've added some notes in square brackets.)

To make 16 buns.

150 gm strong wholemeal flour
300 gm (UK plain / USA all-purpose) white flour [I've actually used white "strong" bread-making flour perfectly well, but "plain" flour would probably give a lighter dough.]

4.5 gm / 1½ tsp dried yeast
50 gm sugar (golden or brown gives better flavour and colour) [I used Muscovado sugar, which gives the dough a lovely brown colour.]
280 ml/gm milk [I've used skimmed and semi-skimmed with good results, but the recipe probably expects full-cream milk.]
1 egg
salt - use 5gm or less ... say 1-1½ tsp. (The original recipe uses 7 gm, which gives a noticeable saltiness to the dough.)
50 gm butter (unsalted) [At room temperature. It needs to be soft so it can be worked into the dough.]

Spices:

[One recipe suggests simply using approx 3 tsp of ground mixed spice, but I prefer the stronger mix that Jane Mason uses, and that I've given here. Elizabeth David uses a more complex mix, but it involves getting whole spices and grinding them.]

2 tsp ground cinnamon
1 tsp ground mixed spice
1 tsp ground ginger
½ tsp ground cloves [You might want to halve this. Half a teaspoonful gives a noticeable flavour of cloves - not unpleasant, but you might want to use less.]
½ tsp ground allspice

Fruit:

100 gm raisins/sultanas (unseeded) (or you could add a proportion of unseeded currants)
70 gm dried apricots, chopped (optional) [I added 70 gm extra sultanas instead, as I hadn't any dried apricots, and I'm not an enthusiast for apricots anyway.]
80 gm candied peel, chopped

Crosses mix: [optional]

50 gm plain flour
pinch of baking powder
½ tsp vegetable oil
50 gm cold water

Glaze:

liquid honey
double cream

[Two rounded tsp of liquid honey plus one rounded tsp of double cream gave more than enough glaze for a single coating on the eighteen buns. If there's any left over, give the buns another coating or discard it; I've found that it doesn't work as well if you keep it in the fridge for a few days.]

**************

Preparation:

Over two days or in one day (this just affects the initial proving of the dough):

The evening of the day before baking, or the morning of baking day:
Rinse the dried fruit (not the peel) and soak it in orange juice (or port, rum, brandy, or medium sweet wine or cider) for a few hours or overnight. Drain and pat dry. [First soak them in just-boiled water, then cold rinse until the water is clear, before adding the port/juice/whatever. You could just do the final soak in water instead. I used port because that's what I had, but it's a bit wasteful, as you have some left over after draining, and you lose some when you dry the fruit. I did drink the drained port, but the raisins gave it an odd flavour. ]

***
.... and start on the dough:

Heat the milk to just below boiling and cool it to room temperature. [If you put the saucepan in a little cold water it cools much faster than if left on the stove top.] Dissolve the sugar in the milk.

Mix the flours, yeast and sugared milk together. Work with a machine or wooden spoon until smooth. Cover and put somewhere warm for an hour or so. [This gives an incredibly stiff dough ... at least, it does with the flours that I used. I added a little milk - a few dessert spoons full - but this did mean that I had to add more flour later.]

[For overnight proving, put this dough somewhere cool. It'll rise well enough in the fridge, but will then need a bit of hand-kneading or resting to bring it back to room temperature.]

Add the beaten egg, salt and spices to the dough. Gather into a ball and knead for ten minutes (or work in the machine with the dough hook for a few minutes).
Add the butter and work for the same time again. The final dough will be firm but sticky, but try to avoid adding any more flour.
[If you're doing this in a kitchen machine, you don't need to worry about the stickiness of the dough, but if you're doing it by hand, you'll probably need to add more plain flour so you can work it ... this may be because of the extra milk I added in the early stages.]

Return the dough to the bowl, cover and rest somewhere warm for 15 minutes or so.

[You may need to add flour to make the dough workable for this next stage.]
Work the fruit and peel into the dough, not too vigorously, to avoid breaking the fruit up. Return the dough to the bowl, cover, keep warm for two hours or more, until it's roughly doubled in size.

******
******

Making the buns:

Pull the dough out onto a very lightly floured surface. Flour your hands, rather than the table-top.

Divide the dough into sixteen equal portions. [I divide the dough using the scales: weigh the whole blob, then divide it into two equal blobs - give or take a gram or two. Then halve each of them, then halve each of these four. The eight blobs can then be halved by hand.]

For each bun, shape the portion of dough into a tight ball (press a ball of dough out, then work your way round the edge, drawing dough out and pressing it back into the centre; then turn the blob of dough over, smooth side upwards, and tighten it into a half-ball by working your fingers around the edges, pushing the dough under and up towards the centre.). [When you work the sides of the ball under, you can carry on doing this until there are no sultanas exposed on the top of the buns, so they won't get burnt in the baking.]

Flour the tops lightly [I do this by rolling each ball in the flour on the work-top before putting them on the baking sheet]. Place the balls a couple of inches apart on a buttered or non-stick baking sheet. Cover and rest for about ¾-1 hour, until the buns are noticeably larger.

***

Pre-heat the oven to 200°C (Gas 6). [about 180°C in a fan oven]

If used, mix the ingredients for the crosses in a bowl until smooth. Load a piping bag ready to make a line about 5 mm across.

To make the glaze, warm the honey and cream together, stirring the mixture. [It turns surprisingly clear.]

***

If your buns seem to have flattened out too much after rising, you can flour your hands and gently fold the edges under again to tighten them up.

Optional: mark the cross on each bun.

Bake for 18-20 minutes. Check to make sure that they're not browning too quickly (you want pale crosses on a chestnut-brown bun), and cover them with foil if they are. [I had a tray of buns on each of two shelves, so swapped them over half way through, so they browned evenly.]

Take them out of the oven and paint immediately with the glaze. You could go over them twice, if you have plenty of glaze and like your buns extra sticky.

Peter

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Last edited by Peter Why on June 22nd, 2017, 10:47 am, edited 11 times in total.

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Post Posted:: June 21st, 2017, 1:41 am 
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Joined: May 26th, 2010, 8:54 am
Posts: 33534
Location: the Netherlands
so cool, thank you so much for the recipe, peter! ill have to try those :D

i baked amazing blackberry lime cakes last weekend, ill share the recipe for that when i get my hands on the paper i had written it on..

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