'Thank You' messages for LibriVox readers - continued

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icequeen
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 24608
Joined: March 3rd, 2009, 3:46 pm
Location: California

Post by icequeen » November 17th, 2020, 9:00 pm

Praise received for AndreaFiore (Andrea Fiore) from our 'Thank a reader' feature:
I want to take the opportunity to thank Andrea Fiore for her excellent work on the Kybalion

This is a seminal title with deep roots in the esoteric and mind power movements, though the authors are cryptic in their description of self I've found that the tenets really do represent the initiatic path, one i've taken through accidental and magical coincidences, it is correct that the teacher appears when the student is ready. I thoroughly enjoyed having Andrea as my proverbial "guide".

Her reading style is soothing and well delivered, which assists in digesting what can be a convoluted and laborious subject for some.

I especially enjoy her tone of voice and the energy delivered when reading(I know that energy may be an ethereal concept to some but it's very real to me because it's the first thing I scan for when meeting people, not good or bad just the intent)

I actively search for titles read by Andrea as I know that care and time were put in to ensure the clearest elocution of terms and the most accurate depiction of the author's intent in meaning.

I will continue to search for your work and enjoy it. I trust the themes will be similar too?

Please keep doing what you do!

Best regards

--
Siphiwo

All of Andrea's recordings!
Ann

"Qui res mundi vellet scire linguam Latinam cognoscat."

icequeen
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 24608
Joined: March 3rd, 2009, 3:46 pm
Location: California

Post by icequeen » November 17th, 2020, 9:08 pm

Praise received for Kitty (Sonia) and SaraHale (Sara Hale) from our 'Thank a reader' feature:
Hi,

I wanted to thank these two readers as I found their readings of the following poems and short stories on your website and I used them in some music I've made. I found them to be not only emotive but also really helpful in terms of helping me settle on loose concepts and atmospheres:

The Seasons, by Richard Chenevix Trench (read by Sonia)
and Sara Hale's readings of various short stories in the collection Stores Worth Rereading.

Thank you,
Jonathan



All of Sonia's recordings!
All of Sara's recordings!
Ann

"Qui res mundi vellet scire linguam Latinam cognoscat."

icequeen
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 24608
Joined: March 3rd, 2009, 3:46 pm
Location: California

Post by icequeen » November 17th, 2020, 9:10 pm

Praise received for Kaffen (Mark F. Smith) from our 'Thank a reader' feature:
For months I’ve been listening to you read Green Mansion. Each characters’ voice is recognizable and your speech is very clear. I so appreciate your readings. Thank you.
and...
My wife and I greatly enjoyed listening to "The House of the Seven Gables" narrated by Mark F. Smith. He has a great voice, and he captured the spooky yet understatedly humorous spirit of the book. Thank you!
All of Mark's recordings!
Ann

"Qui res mundi vellet scire linguam Latinam cognoscat."

icequeen
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 24608
Joined: March 3rd, 2009, 3:46 pm
Location: California

Post by icequeen » November 17th, 2020, 9:17 pm

Praise received for Helsbelles (Helen Taylor) from our 'Thank a reader' feature:
I just finished listening to The Benefactress. You did an outstanding job reading this book. I am looking forward to listening to other books you've narrated. Thank you so much.

Twila

All of Helen's recordings!
Ann

"Qui res mundi vellet scire linguam Latinam cognoscat."

icequeen
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 24608
Joined: March 3rd, 2009, 3:46 pm
Location: California

Post by icequeen » November 17th, 2020, 9:22 pm

Praise received for TheVagabond (Tom Denholm) from our 'Thank a reader' feature:
Dear Tom,



My initial search for audio recordings came from a desire to be read to; after all, even when children can read on their own, there is something viscerally comforting about sharing a story in the company of another. Additionally, after working all day either reading or writing emails, engaging on the phone, and (less often now) in person, being read to is a rare gift. Moreover, as we have all experienced the "lock down" effects and isolation of COVID, the avenues by which we can feel connected can be brought forth by any number of creative means, including being read to by a person halfway around the world whom one has never met. Add to those factors a two-month period off of work after a total knee replacement in July, accompanied by the stultifying mental ennui that constant attention to physical recovery can elicit, and one has multiple reasons to be grateful for Librivox in general, and your recordings in particular.



The Cloister and The Hearth was my second Librivox book, and quickly became an addiction of sorts, accompanying me for hours on the treadmill and into sleepless nights. Allow me to insert an excerpt from a letter I wrote in August to my former English Professor, who has become a good friend as well:



This is all leading up to a book that has been, and continues to be, an informative and delightful companion during my recovery: The Cloister and the Hearth, by Charles Reade, with which I know you must be familiar. For me it was akin to finding a forgotten chocolate bar in the bottom of a kitchen drawer. What a fantastic piece of historical fiction! It takes me back to The Canterbury Tales, filling in the rich detail of everyday life. Although it is meant to take place in the fifteenth century (so is a bit later than Chaucer's lifetime, I am aware), there are so many familiar threads connecting what I learned in class. For example, the central role of Sancta Mater Ecclesia, the various religious orders, primogeniture practices which resulted in "one to inherit, one to fight, and one to the Church," as well as understanding what passed for "medicine" versus superstition versus herbal folklore. Reade shows how communities were policed and controlled—including swift sentences and gruesome punishments. In addition, modern people can barely imagine the dangers of travel and language barriers of the time, much less the widely varying conditions of what passed for hospitality from one place to another (more than one public house was so wretched, I thought that, had it been me, I would gladly have slept outside with the wolves.) There is even a Pardoner in the story!



The version I'm listening to is read by Tom Denholm, who has, to my ear, a masterful grasp not only of English, but also of French, Latin, Dutch and Italian. I appreciate that Reade does not translate the frequent Latin, as it gives my ear and mind a good workout; of course, context is quite helpful. So far, as of Chapter 75, my favorite character, by far, is Denys! I find Margaret to be worthy, but a bit simpering, and Gerard simple and a bit of a dolt: I mean to say, it is a bit unlikely that such a devoted man should not return to Holland immediately upon hearing of his wife's death, if nothing else than to grieve at her grave. So, although admirable in strength of character, I find the young couple rather flat characters. I also steam at the author's constant pronouncements on how women are put together—as though only by nature or by men's engagement can they be brought to fruitful use! I know that Reade was a product of the late nineteenth century, so I allow for that and try not to cringe overmuch.



I have to admit that Margaret was more than redeemed—or transformed—through suffering (Ad astra per aspera) such that by the end, her character showed a wisdom and maturity I did not expect—but heartily welcomed. Gerard, too, in his way, was redeemed.



Following the magnum opus of Cloister, I searched for other titles recorded by you. I appreciate the summaries you have written, in that they have widened my field of literature and, as a favorite author becomes a trusted source for new reading, you have become a trusted source for new listening. On the surface, I might not have opened Adam Bede, but trusted your assessment, and am very glad I did. I have only just finished listening tonight, and feel I have been on a satisfying journey through a particular time and place with wonderful guides. I am astonished at the range of voices your reading portrays, and am at loss as to how you manage to keep them straight and consistent throughout! Being a Yank, I especially enjoyed the dialects coming to life. Oh, my goodness, but Mrs. Poyser has a wit! Had I read the book myself, I would not have appreciated in any way the quirky, musical vernacular that flows like mystery, ending in comprehension.



Thank you for the incomprehensible number of hours you have dedicated to bringing these works to life. I look forward to my next Tom Denholm Librivox recording!



Best regards,



Sandra

All of Tom's recordings!
Ann

"Qui res mundi vellet scire linguam Latinam cognoscat."

icequeen
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 24608
Joined: March 3rd, 2009, 3:46 pm
Location: California

Post by icequeen » November 17th, 2020, 9:31 pm

Praise received for raghaillaigh (Vin Reilly), edgood (Ed Good), Kitt (Kit Noussis), ratan (Ratandeep Singh) and CaprishaPage (Caprisha Page)

Hi Librivox



Please would you thank the following readers on my behalf for providing the inspiration for five songs I’ve created. I started with some of my favourite poems and then, well, let my imagination take over!


The poems and readers are:


1. Death Be Not Proud (John Donne) – Vin Reilly (0:00)

2. A Psalm of Life (Henry Longfellow) – Ed Good (3:00)

3. The Tyger (William Blake) – Kit Noussis (5:30)

4. Daffodils (William Wordsworth) – Ratandeep Singh (11:10)

5. On His Blindness (John Milton) – Caprisha Page (14:30)

Here’s the link to listen to them all in the sequence above:

https://soundcloud.com/user-522587607/five-poems/s-qbL76xJ5jal


If the readers just want to hear their own poem the approximate start times for each song are in brackets above.


Cheers


Steve
All of Vin's recordings!
All of Ed's recordings!
All of Kit's recordings!
All of Ratandeep's recordings
All of Caprisha's recordings!
Ann

"Qui res mundi vellet scire linguam Latinam cognoscat."

icequeen
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 24608
Joined: March 3rd, 2009, 3:46 pm
Location: California

Post by icequeen » November 17th, 2020, 9:36 pm

Praise received for gloriana (Elizabeth Klett) from our 'Thank a reader' feature:
Wonderful work, Elizabeth! I enjoyed this recording of Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte immensely. https://librivox.org/jane-eyre-version-3-by-charlotte-bronte/ The British accent, tempo, and feeling were all masterfully accomplished in this superb performance. Many thanks for sharing your talent.

Mia

All of Elizabeth's recordings!
Ann

"Qui res mundi vellet scire linguam Latinam cognoscat."

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