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Post Posted:: June 2nd, 2017, 11:06 am 

Joined: December 17th, 2016, 10:21 am
Posts: 28
lurcherlover wrote:
bubbaspeare wrote:

I did my Librivox test, got distracted, and still haven't done the short poem Librivox Admin recommend doing. Would like to give Reaper a try for that :D

Cheers

Bubba


A short poem would be a good test for using Reaper from the free trial download. You could record it several times and edit between different versions. If you want advice on shortcuts, setting up a customised version, or anything else, as well as the forum at http://forum.cockos.com/index.php I can give you tips as well.

You may need to import the edited file into Audacity (which takes just seconds) to then export it again as an MP3. This is very quick and easy.

If you download the Checker it will take your final file and check it to pass it or fail it on certain criteria. Once passed Librivox will accept the file (subject to no reading or editing errors) and you are home and dry.

Interesting reading of Shakespeare's Sonnet 130 - surprise after the cockney accent in the intro. I liked the slow pace too, that's hard to do!

Peter


Hey Peter, hope all is productive at you're end of the microphone.

A quick question: have you found that with Reaper the gain level is especially low compared to Audacity?

I only ask because I don't know what I've done wrong here. The volume sounded all spiffy and loud on the Mac, which has no Internet connection, so the mp3 was then transferred to the PC for upload to the 'test' section here:

https://librivox.org/uploads/tests/test_bubbaspeare.mp3

For some reason the gain has fallen off dramatically. Don't know why. As you know, I am a complete idiot when it comes to anything technical. During the reign of the video cassette, I never once managed to record anything. Couldn't understand the manuals :-)

I figure going the Reaper route will, by not having to read two manuals, save me time and tears in the long run.

Thanks Dude

Bubba


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Post Posted:: June 3rd, 2017, 1:56 am 

Joined: November 10th, 2016, 3:54 am
Posts: 359
Location: LONDON UK
bubbaspeare wrote:
lurcherlover wrote:
bubbaspeare wrote:

I did my Librivox test, got distracted, and still haven't done the short poem Librivox Admin recommend doing. Would like to give Reaper a try for that :D

Cheers

Bubba


A short poem would be a good test for using Reaper from the free trial download. You could record it several times and edit between different versions. If you want advice on shortcuts, setting up a customised version, or anything else, as well as the forum at http://forum.cockos.com/index.php I can give you tips as well.

You may need to import the edited file into Audacity (which takes just seconds) to then export it again as an MP3. This is very quick and easy.

If you download the Checker it will take your final file and check it to pass it or fail it on certain criteria. Once passed Librivox will accept the file (subject to no reading or editing errors) and you are home and dry.

Interesting reading of Shakespeare's Sonnet 130 - surprise after the cockney accent in the intro. I liked the slow pace too, that's hard to do!

Peter


Hey Peter, hope all is productive at you're end of the microphone.

A quick question: have you found that with Reaper the gain level is especially low compared to Audacity?

I only ask because I don't know what I've done wrong here. The volume sounded all spiffy and loud on the Mac, which has no Internet connection, so the mp3 was then transferred to the PC for upload to the 'test' section here:

https://librivox.org/uploads/tests/test_bubbaspeare.mp3

For some reason the gain has fallen off dramatically. Don't know why. As you know, I am a complete idiot when it comes to anything technical. During the reign of the video cassette, I never once managed to record anything. Couldn't understand the manuals :-)

I figure going the Reaper route will, by not having to read two manuals, save me time and tears in the long run.

Thanks Dude

Bubba


Yes, it is certainly quiet and way below the levels you need for LV. In Reaper there is the floating MASTER MIXER which gives the peak and/or RMS decibel output readings. You should be peaking up to about -8dB You can move the slider up to get the required levels. (Make sure you have the floating Master mixer ticked under VIEW in the dropdown menu in REAPER).

To correct the MP3 in Audacity go to "EFFECT" and "AMPLIFY" and increase the (+ dB) by between +8 and +12 dB to get a good level. (i.e. MARK the whole file first. It will go darker. You can do this by using "select all" in the menu).

I think your file was as much as 20dB below what it should be, so go up to +20dB if necessary - but not into the red.

Hope this helps.

P.S. There is also the slider on each track (on left at start of track in REAPER) and you need to make sure you are recording at that level, peaking at about -8 dB. This gives you some headroom and a pretty full sound.

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https://librivox.org/reader/11274


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Post Posted:: June 6th, 2017, 8:00 am 

Joined: December 17th, 2016, 10:21 am
Posts: 28
Thanks again Peter. You are the Professor. I appreciate your taking the time to type all that up. Everything is now spiffy again.

Now, let's find a short poem...

Bubba


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Post Posted:: August 22nd, 2017, 4:27 am 

Joined: November 10th, 2016, 3:54 am
Posts: 359
Location: LONDON UK
I'm not referring to anyone in particular, but occasionally when I listen to a recording I find that there is a lot of reverb/echo. Unlike with music, the spoken voice needs to be very dry to achieve maximum clarity. Also, people often find excessive echo rather tiring to listen to. Reverb should really only be used for effect (say in a cave in a dramatic work) where it would be only for a short duration.

Many professional audiobook people tell me that close miking within a dry room (or with some duvet/blanket treatment) is a must, and even there are times when the professional broadcasting organisations get it wrong and record in an echoey location (Usually short news items where they are not too fussy).

I realise that there are often circumstances where dry recordings are difficult or impossible, but it's always worth remembering in the situations where the sound can be tightened up. In the situation where it is impossible then to continue recording is the most important thing. But always remember that moving really close into the mic (without getting plosives) will make a big difference.

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https://librivox.org/reader/11274


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