Audio discrepancy with new recording sessions

Post your questions & get help from friendly LibriVoxers
Post Reply
KimL
Posts: 60
Joined: January 8th, 2021, 2:10 pm

Post by KimL » February 10th, 2021, 8:58 am

Hello...newbie here!! I am in the middle of recording a short children's story for Librivox and have recorded the darn thing about a dozen times! :? I'm having a problem with the name of the main character and keep pronouncing it wrong in various parts of the recording (silly me). It would makes sense to re-record the little word or phrase and edit it in. However, when I go back to record the corrected phrase, the audio sounds different from the first one. So, that is why I scrap the thing and re-record the whole thing. I'm thinking there has got to be a better way. A small story should not take me this long.

Does anyone have advice on getting consistent audio, even during different recording sessions? Part of the problem sounds like the acoustics in the room. I don't have a padded booth or anything. I was thinking about taking a plastic bin and putting padding in there and put my microphone in there. Would that help?

The second observation is my voice, vocal tone, and even animation seem different. Perhaps this is a newbie issue, where I can't maintain the same vocal quality for my readings in different sittings. Any tips on this? :help:

Thanks,
KIm

sjmarky
Posts: 3075
Joined: August 28th, 2006, 8:47 pm
Location: Poictesme
Contact:

Post by sjmarky » February 10th, 2021, 10:31 am

There are some things you can do. First, if you can, never move or touch your mic or other stuff between recording sessions; leave everything in exactly the same place if possible. Even small changes will affect the sound. Second, make sure you always use the same chair and in the same position. Some people even mark the floor with tape. Third, listen to the original recording several times before recording your pickup. Practice matching the earlier recording with regard to pacing, expression, etc. This is the only time I wear headphones when recording, so I can clearly hear the previous take. Fourth - and I don't know if you do this - record your pickup in a separate file, and then edit it in, rather than try to record over the earlier take. This allows you to check it for being satisfactory before making the actual edit, plus make fine adjustments to match the volume.

I hope this helps.
Last edited by sjmarky on February 10th, 2021, 10:39 am, edited 1 time in total.
"Bringing you yesterday's tomorrow...today!"

My website
My Librivox reader page

philchenevert
LibriVox Admin Team
Posts: 20137
Joined: October 17th, 2010, 9:23 pm
Location: Basking by the Bayou
Contact:

Post by philchenevert » February 10th, 2021, 10:37 am

Remembering Names. Yeah, this is a problem that doesn't exist when reading but is BIG when recording. The simple solution for me is to have a page in front of me and when a name comes up, say 'Dorothy', that I might say different ways, I write it in big block letters and then next to it how I will say it in this recording. It could be 'Dor-thy' or Dor-o-thy'. I pick what I like and keep that page open on my desk in front of me to remind me all the time. Any name that may cause problems is added to the list. Consistency is important and this keeps me on track. Mark dealt with the other consistency of environment; I agree completely with him.
All I'm saying is that the house doesn't fill up with annoying fruit flies when I buy donuts

Need Help? Check out these little videos: https://wiki.librivox.org/index.php/Instructional_Videos

KimL
Posts: 60
Joined: January 8th, 2021, 2:10 pm

Post by KimL » February 10th, 2021, 10:39 am

sjmarky wrote:
February 10th, 2021, 10:31 am
There are some things you can do. First, if you can, never move or touch your mic or other stuff between recording sessions; leave everything in exactly the same place if possible. Even small changes will affect the sound. Second, make sure you always use the same chair and in the same position. Some people even mark the floor with tape. Third, listen to the original recording several times before recording your pickup. Practice matching the earlier recording with regard to pacing, expression, etc. This is the only time I wear headphones when recording, so I can clearly hear the previous take. Fourth - and I don't if you do this - record your pickup in a separate file, and then edit it in, rather than try to record over the earlier take. This allows you to check it for being satisfactory before making the actual edit, plus make fine adjustments to match the volume.

I hope this helps.
Thanks, these tips help. One thing I am curious about is when you say you don't wear headphones during recording. I just bought a mic that allows you to plug in a headphone. Is there an advantage of not wearing one? I figured it would help me hear voice quality as it is live.

I'm going to have to work on not moving stuff around. I move things all the time (laptop, mic., etc.).

Thanks,
Kim

sjmarky
Posts: 3075
Joined: August 28th, 2006, 8:47 pm
Location: Poictesme
Contact:

Post by sjmarky » February 10th, 2021, 11:43 am

I just find them distracting and hot and uncomfortable after 20-30 minutes. Trying to listen to myself while talking just doesn't work for me. I haven't noticed any improvement in my narration quality with headphones. I use headphones as I said for pickups and also for final editing.
"Bringing you yesterday's tomorrow...today!"

My website
My Librivox reader page

KevinS
Posts: 10605
Joined: April 7th, 2019, 8:32 am
Contact:

Post by KevinS » February 10th, 2021, 1:00 pm

philchenevert wrote:
February 10th, 2021, 10:37 am
Remembering Names. Yeah, this is a problem that doesn't exist when reading but is BIG when recording. The simple solution for me is to have a page in front of me and when a name comes up, say 'Dorothy', that I might say different ways, I write it in big block letters and then next to it how I will say it in this recording. It could be 'Dor-thy' or Dor-o-thy'. I pick what I like and keep that page open on my desk in front of me to remind me all the time. Any name that may cause problems is added to the list. Consistency is important and this keeps me on track. Mark dealt with the other consistency of environment; I agree completely with him.
Good advice!
Not feeling well. I'll get back to work as soon as possible. My LibriVox: https://librivox.org/sections/readers/13278

JenniferFour
Posts: 460
Joined: December 11th, 2015, 5:04 pm
Location: Virginia, USA

Post by JenniferFour » February 18th, 2021, 9:18 pm

When editing a correction in, you would be amazed at much adjusting the volume helps. Put it in and then raise or lower the volume of the correction to more closely match the audio around it.
Critical feedback is ALWAYS welcome - in the forum or via PM

Post Reply