How/when/if we should read notes in books?

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MamaGeek
Posts: 687
Joined: May 1st, 2017, 7:58 am

Post by MamaGeek » May 27th, 2019, 6:32 pm

Hi!

So far I have dealt with some notes or an asterisk by reading them exactly where they appear rather than at the end of the page or chapters. I think it is less confusing for the listener. When there are just a couple here and there it's not a problem however some books have many and sometimes very long notes.

What is the general rule when dealing with notes? I notice that some are numbered 1, 2 etc. per page and some 1 - 20 or more etc. per chapter. Are we obliged to read all notes? Is it possible to suggest that the listener refer to the text version for them?

I am very interested to hear the input of admin members, PL's and readers.

Thank you!!!! Cheers!
Celine

annise
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Post by annise » May 27th, 2019, 7:00 pm

The reading of notes is left to the discretrion of the BC. It's impossible tocover all the possibilties of notes in audiobooks,
As a general rule , if the note says "see page 291" I leave them
If it's an explanation of a native language term like " He brandished his mwalithump (see note)" and the note says "silk hankcherchief" I'd replace the see note with it and change my voice to be a stage aside for it.
So if it adds to the understandability read it, if it doesn't , don't

Anne

MamaGeek
Posts: 687
Joined: May 1st, 2017, 7:58 am

Post by MamaGeek » May 28th, 2019, 5:46 am

Thank you Anne. I appreciate your prompt reply very much.

I'm seeing many many notes mostly in books that deal with history and they are very often references to materials which I will skip if I understand you correctly.

Here is an example of 2 notes (one very long) in the "France and England in North America" series which I am thinking of recording. Could I omit both?? I don't mind reading them but it certainly interrupts the flow in many cases.

He found it hard to bear the imperious temper of his wife; and he was given the government of Canada to deliver him from her, and afford him some means of living." [9] Certain scandalous songs of the day 12 assign a different motive for his appointment. Louis XIV. was enamoured of Madame de Montespan. She had once smiled upon Frontenac; and it is said that the jealous king gladly embraced the opportunity of removing from his presence, and from hers, a lover who had forestalled him. [10]
[9] Memoires du Duc de Saint-Simon, II. 270; V. 336.
[10] Note of M. Brunet, in Correspondance de la Duchesse d'Orléans, I. 200 (ed. 1869).
The following lines, among others, were passed about secretly among the courtiers:—
"Je suis ravi que le roi, notre sire,
Aime la Montespan;
Moi, Frontenac, je me crève de rire,
Sachant ce qui lui pend;
Et je dirai, sans être des plus bestes,
Tu n'as que mon reste,
Roi,
Tu n'as que mon reste."
Mademoiselle de Montpensier had mentioned in her memoirs, some years before, that Frontenac, in taking out his handkerchief, dropped from his pocket a love-letter to Mademoiselle de Mortemart, afterwards Madame de Montespan, which was picked up by one of the attendants of the princess. The king, on the other hand, was at one time attracted by the charms of Madame de Frontenac, against whom, however, no aspersion is cast.
The Comte de Grignan, son-in-law of Madame de Sévigné, was an unsuccessful competitor with Frontenac for the government of Canada.
Celine

annise
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Post by annise » May 28th, 2019, 6:18 am

It would be fine to omit them, I feel

Anne

MamaGeek
Posts: 687
Joined: May 1st, 2017, 7:58 am

Post by MamaGeek » May 28th, 2019, 6:19 am

YAYYYYY! Thanks a lot. :clap:
Celine

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