One way to remove clicks embedded in words:

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Spiffycat
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Joined: December 21st, 2018, 5:56 pm

Post by Spiffycat » March 5th, 2019, 7:54 pm

lurcherlover wrote:
March 4th, 2019, 5:10 am
As tovarisch has said, it will be a big job and I think tiresome to do more than a few de-clicking edits. Surely you should find the reason and/or source for the clicks and eliminate the cause? If the clicks are electronic then you need to trace the reason. (And it will give you more time to get out more often ...)

If they are aural i.e. in the recording space, then you need to eliminate them or find a quieter space.
You are right about finding the source----I definitely think I was too close to the mic. When I back off there doesn't seem to be a problem. And yeah, I need to get out...

Spiffycat
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Joined: December 21st, 2018, 5:56 pm

Post by Spiffycat » March 5th, 2019, 7:58 pm

Penumbra wrote:
March 3rd, 2019, 6:44 pm
My clicks are almost always about 3500 Hz so the ones that de-clicker can't handle I go after with a notch filter at 3500 (Q of 0.5), or zoom in until I can see the cycle with the click and just cut it out. But most of them are eliminated (or at least sufficiently reduced) by de-clicker. Thank you, Tricia, for pointing me to it some months ago.


I'm impressed that you know what Hz your clicks are. I'm slowly learning the technical side just bc it's kind of interesting. I had only one click in the following chapter, so I think it's a "I'm too close" thing.

lurcherlover
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Post by lurcherlover » March 6th, 2019, 1:24 am

Spiffycat wrote:
March 5th, 2019, 7:54 pm
You are right about finding the source----I definitely think I was too close to the mic. When I back off there doesn't seem to be a problem. And yeah, I need to get out...
How close are you to the mic? Usual distances are anything from 6 inches (14cm) to 15 inches (approx. 32cm). What mic is it?

If you are too close to the mic then the clicks must be coming from your mouth, lips - or something. It's worth having a drink of water (room temp) handy to avoid this. You could experiment very close to the mic and just open and close your mouth and breath normally, and then try a few sentences to see if any clicks are recorded.

Do you use either a pop filter (preferable) or a foam cover on the mic? These, especially a good pop filter, can allow you to be close and avoid any such clicks. You can (depending on the polar pattern of the mic), angle it slightly away so there is less chance of any mouth noise going straight onto the diaphragm if it's a capacitor (condenser) mic, or if it's a ribbon mic, which needs to be protected anyway as ribbons are delicate.

Hope this helps.

Spiffycat
Posts: 130
Joined: December 21st, 2018, 5:56 pm

Post by Spiffycat » March 7th, 2019, 7:13 pm

tovarisch wrote:
March 4th, 2019, 6:52 am
There is the third kind (in addition to electronic interference and sound in the room), and albeit rarely but I do meet them in my recordings. I think they might be due to some hitch/bug in the software. I doubt it's in Reaper, so most likely place is the driver of my USB interface. Once in a great while there would be a click/crack in the track and I just can't pinpoint the source, and it does not sound like what my mouth would produce (tongue, lips). There are two ways of dealing with them, as already has been pointed out: cutting it out or re-recording. I have done both. Luckily those weird clicks are so rare that spending a couple minutes on carefully removing one from a waveform is not a big tax on my editing time.

The bottomline: get familiar with all the stuff you'll likely encounter and learn different ways of dealing with it -- know your tools, their limitations and their capabilities. :)
Yes, I am getting to know the software, and I do occasionally get some blip that I'm sure isn't me, and doesn't look like the buzzing that occasionally occurs from electronics. But, as you experienced, they are very rare. I'm figuring things out slowly. My last chapter will probably be the best one. I don't even like listening to the earlier ones now---it makes me wince.

Spiffycat
Posts: 130
Joined: December 21st, 2018, 5:56 pm

Post by Spiffycat » March 7th, 2019, 7:15 pm

Penumbra wrote:
March 3rd, 2019, 6:44 pm
My clicks are almost always about 3500 Hz so the ones that de-clicker can't handle I go after with a notch filter at 3500 (Q of 0.5), or zoom in until I can see the cycle with the click and just cut it out. But most of them are eliminated (or at least sufficiently reduced) by de-clicker. Thank you, Tricia, for pointing me to it some months ago.
Thanks for your reply---I sent you a lengthy reply which is now gone because I'm not forum adept yet. I'm keeping in mind the 3500 Hz comment---it's over my head temporarily, I hope.

Spiffycat
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Joined: December 21st, 2018, 5:56 pm

Post by Spiffycat » March 7th, 2019, 7:18 pm

lurcherlover wrote:
March 6th, 2019, 1:24 am
Spiffycat wrote:
March 5th, 2019, 7:54 pm
You are right about finding the source----I definitely think I was too close to the mic. When I back off there doesn't seem to be a problem. And yeah, I need to get out...
How close are you to the mic? Usual distances are anything from 6 inches (14cm) to 15 inches (approx. 32cm). What mic is it?

If you are too close to the mic then the clicks must be coming from your mouth, lips - or something. It's worth having a drink of water (room temp) handy to avoid this. You could experiment very close to the mic and just open and close your mouth and breath normally, and then try a few sentences to see if any clicks are recorded.

Do you use either a pop filter (preferable) or a foam cover on the mic? These, especially a good pop filter, can allow you to be close and avoid any such clicks. You can (depending on the polar pattern of the mic), angle it slightly away so there is less chance of any mouth noise going straight onto the diaphragm if it's a capacitor (condenser) mic, or if it's a ribbon mic, which needs to be protected anyway as ribbons are delicate.

Hope this helps.
I am definitely too close to the mic, usually on low energy days, but I see that's not a way to save time. I do still pop a bit, but not nearly so much now. I use a blue nessie, and as you suggest, will soon buy a pop filter. I do sip constantly, but apparently not enough. I have blue lozenges too that help.

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Post by Darvinia » March 7th, 2019, 8:29 pm

Spiffycat wrote: ---I sent you a lengthy reply which is now gone because I'm not forum adept yet.
If I'm writing a long response I type it up in a text editor such as NotePad, save it often, correct and re-arrange it, and then copy/paste into my reply here. Even being forum adept, sometimes the gremlins take over. :P
Bev

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lurcherlover
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Post by lurcherlover » March 8th, 2019, 1:08 am

lurcherlover wrote:
March 8th, 2019, 1:04 am
Spiffycat wrote:
March 7th, 2019, 7:18 pm
lurcherlover wrote:
March 6th, 2019, 1:24 am


How close are you to the mic? Usual distances are anything from 6 inches (14cm) to 15 inches (approx. 32cm). What mic is it?

If you are too close to the mic then the clicks must be coming from your mouth, lips - or something. It's worth having a drink of water (room temp) handy to avoid this. You could experiment very close to the mic and just open and close your mouth and breath normally, and then try a few sentences to see if any clicks are recorded.

Do you use either a pop filter (preferable) or a foam cover on the mic? These, especially a good pop filter, can allow you to be close and avoid any such clicks. You can (depending on the polar pattern of the mic), angle it slightly away so there is less chance of any mouth noise going straight onto the diaphragm if it's a capacitor (condenser) mic, or if it's a ribbon mic, which needs to be protected anyway as ribbons are delicate.

Hope this helps.
I am definitely too close to the mic, usually on low energy days, but I see that's not a way to save time. I do still pop a bit, but not nearly so much now. I use a blue nessie, and as you suggest, will soon buy a pop filter. I do sip constantly, but apparently not enough. I have blue lozenges too that help.
Why do you need to be close to the mic, on low energy days?

If you had the mic at about 15 inches or even slightly further away, you can then increase the gain so that you get a good level of voice. The only downside is that the further you are from the mic, the more room sound you may get, such as echo or early reflections picked up by the mic. It's a tradeoff between recording gain, and more distance from the mic. A duvet or even a blanket placed behind you will greatly reduce any reflections back into the mic, and another behind the mic facing you will also improve things.

You need to experiment as it is not necessary to speak loudly or shout into the mic, and good use of gain and the right distance from the mic, plus a pop filter and the use of sound deadening materials (blankets, duvets) will lead to excellent and highly professional recordings.

Maybe you could record a short piece of say a couple of minutes after trying these suggestions and post it on LV in this thread so we can hear what the problem may be, if it still exists.

Spiffycat
Posts: 130
Joined: December 21st, 2018, 5:56 pm

Post by Spiffycat » March 17th, 2019, 5:04 pm

Darvinia wrote:
March 7th, 2019, 8:29 pm
Spiffycat wrote: ---I sent you a lengthy reply which is now gone because I'm not forum adept yet.
If I'm writing a long response I type it up in a text editor such as NotePad, save it often, correct and re-arrange it, and then copy/paste into my reply here. Even being forum adept, sometimes the gremlins take over. :P

Gremlins! Finally a good explanation. I'm seriously not used to this kind of forum, but I'm glad to know it's not me. :D

Spiffycat
Posts: 130
Joined: December 21st, 2018, 5:56 pm

Post by Spiffycat » March 17th, 2019, 5:12 pm

lurcherlover wrote:
March 8th, 2019, 1:08 am
lurcherlover wrote:
March 8th, 2019, 1:04 am
Spiffycat wrote:
March 7th, 2019, 7:18 pm


I am definitely too close to the mic, usually on low energy days, but I see that's not a way to save time. I do still pop a bit, but not nearly so much now. I use a blue nessie, and as you suggest, will soon buy a pop filter. I do sip constantly, but apparently not enough. I have blue lozenges too that help.
Why do you need to be close to the mic, on low energy days?

If you had the mic at about 15 inches or even slightly further away, you can then increase the gain so that you get a good level of voice. The only downside is that the further you are from the mic, the more room sound you may get, such as echo or early reflections picked up by the mic. It's a tradeoff between recording gain, and more distance from the mic. A duvet or even a blanket placed behind you will greatly reduce any reflections back into the mic, and another behind the mic facing you will also improve things.

You need to experiment as it is not necessary to speak loudly or shout into the mic, and good use of gain and the right distance from the mic, plus a pop filter and the use of sound deadening materials (blankets, duvets) will lead to excellent and highly professional recordings.

Maybe you could record a short piece of say a couple of minutes after trying these suggestions and post it on LV in this thread so we can hear what the problem may be, if it still exists.
Sorry for the late response---I do so much appreciate the input. I basically get too close when I'm tired bc I think I won't produce enough volume otherwise. I also get breathy and clicky. I did install a declicker bc I have a lot of raw files made prior to the info this forum provided and by golly it works! I will try the 15 in. suggestion for future chapters, and I'm going to try the duvets in front and behind as well. Thanks for taking the time to analyze my situation---much appreciation. SC

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