British money - How to read

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kristin
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Post by kristin » January 24th, 2007, 5:15 pm

How would this be read? I'm guessing it's pound, shilling, pence. Is d pence or something else, I'm not sure about that one?

"When did they ever bring in half their market value in L. s. d."

MisterSam
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Post by MisterSam » January 24th, 2007, 5:55 pm

d is short for denarius but its basically a penny yes :)
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MisterSam
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Post by MisterSam » January 24th, 2007, 5:56 pm

About the first bit, yes first pounds then shillings then pence
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kristin
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Post by kristin » January 24th, 2007, 6:32 pm

Thanks. :D

Denarius? Roman currency? Hmmm....

ChrisHughes
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Post by ChrisHughes » January 25th, 2007, 12:06 am

Yup. The L is for librae (Lira?), the s for solidi, and the d for denarii.

It's all here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/£sd

Those Romans were great ones for laying firm foundations.
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earthcalling
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Post by earthcalling » January 25th, 2007, 12:14 am

Quite right.

"When did they ever bring in half their market value in pounds, shillings and pence."

kristin
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Post by kristin » January 25th, 2007, 1:54 am

That's fascinating and completely illogical, firm foundations or no. Thanks for the explanation.

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